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  1. #21
    Join Date
    Jan. 19, 2000
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    a nice warm place
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    the owners' are very much in need of Swat. They go through a jar of it everytime they apply it around the wounds. Unfortunately, Swat only comes in small jars. Any other ideas?



  2. #22
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    Jun. 30, 2000
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    The Confederacy
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    <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by InWhyCee:
    ... I found myself smiling when the author reported that the dog had been shot; smiling when the dog's owner appeared in handcuffs. <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

    You and me both.



  3. #23
    Join Date
    Mar. 18, 2000
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    Brantford, Ontario
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    Somewhere I have pictures of a Standardbred filly who was attacked by a Doberman. She may have been a weanling at the time, or may just have been a foal.

    Poor little thing though, her one ear was completely mangled, as was her poll. I think Dad sewed the ear back on, but it was always very crumpled looking, and she had a lot of scar tissue on the top of her head. I don't know what became of her though...

    Dad didn't normally take pictures of his equine patients, but this little girl had such remarkable injuries, he took pictures when it first happened, as well as from time to time as she healed.

    Steph [img]/infopop/emoticons/icon_smile.gif[/img]
    Half the failures in life arise from pulling in one's horse as he is leaping -Julius Hare



  4. #24
    Join Date
    Aug. 8, 2002
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    The great Bluegrass State. Or Commonwealth. Whatever.
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    My JRT was attacked by a pit this summer who was loose downtown. It just came after her, grabbing her by the stomach and started shaking her. Through divine intervention, plus some wonderful bystanders and lots of beating this dog on the head, we managed to get her out of the pit's mouth. Amazingly, she had very few serious injuries, though it did cost me upwards of $1000.
    Owner was never found.

    Not a fan of pits, but REALLY not a fan of irresponsible owners!

    You win a few, you lose a few. Some get rained out. But you got to dress for all of them. --Satchel Paige
    To be conscious that you are ignorant is a great step to knowledge.



  5. #25
    Join Date
    Jan. 26, 2000
    Posts
    666

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    I own two pits and they are trained and don't go near the horses.

    Our horses were badly injured by neighbors dogs running them down...one was a fluffy golden retriever.

    And I've seen too many JRT's rip cats to shreds.

    So let's not focus on just one breed. An animal that isn't safe shouldn't be in public and most states have leash laws.

    People are responsible for their dogs and if the dog is doing damage they are responsible.



  6. #26
    Join Date
    Sep. 12, 2001
    Location
    Hotlanta
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    ...BUT you have to remember that they are bred to bite down and not let go, no matter what. If even the sweetest, most lovable pit bull (and yes, I've known several [img]/infopop/emoticons/icon_smile.gif[/img] ) bites something, its tendency will always be to lock those huge jaws. THAT'S the dangerous part. The issue is not whether a pit bull MAY bite, it's the damage that will be inflicted IF it bites. Enough to prevent me from owning one.

    That said, I worked for a small animal clinic for a year and the ONLY dog that ever bit me and drew blood was a MUTT! [img]/infopop/emoticons/icon_redface.gif[/img] Then there was a bulldog who would bite your shoe and not let go. [img]/infopop/emoticons/icon_eek.gif[/img] Imagine having a bulldog attached to one of your feet while you're trying to boot him off with your other foot! [img]/infopop/emoticons/icon_razz.gif[/img] The dog was a regular boarder, and, with his owner's blessing, we eventually fixed this behavior with icky-tasting "training spray" squirted in his face...stopped him cold every time! [img]/infopop/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif[/img]

    A can of that stuff (it was Orange something-or-other) would fit in a pocket on a trail-riding saddle pad.

    But nothing can prevent ignorant dog owners. [img]/infopop/emoticons/icon_mad.gif[/img] I think the owners of that horse should file suit to cover its medical expenses. I bet they could get something for the children's emotional distress, too. Unfortunately, bringing lawsuits and charges against such people is often the only way to stop them. My advice to the horse's owners: Get a good lawyer! [img]/infopop/emoticons/icon_redface.gif[/img]

    I hope the horse recovers quickly. Sad to say, but the horse taking the brunt of the attack may have saved the child. [img]/infopop/emoticons/icon_frown.gif[/img] She deserves hero status!

    ~Sara [img]/infopop/emoticons/icon_cool.gif[/img]

    "If you can't dazzle 'em with brilliance, baffle 'em with bull." -Bart Simpson

    Member of the Dirt Divers 78th Airborne Division, ATH Squadron



  7. #27
    Join Date
    May. 16, 2000
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    4,699

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    <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by sbt78lw:
    I hope the horse recovers quickly. Sad to say, but the horse taking the brunt of the attack may have saved the child. [img]/infopop/emoticons/icon_frown.gif[/img] She deserves hero status!

    <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

    It was so sad reading this account. I thought the same thing about the horse; if the horse hadn't been between the dog and the little girl, we might have been reading about a badly maimed or dead child. I'm not trying to minimize the tragedy here, but I imagine the parents are extremely grateful that their daughter is home safe and sound. And it sounds as though they are going to heroic lengths to save the horse!
    Charter member of the I-Refuse-to-Relinquish-My-Whip Clique



  8. #28
    Join Date
    Oct. 9, 2000
    Posts
    3,691

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    I have "Bear Repellent Spray" which is basically pepper spray in a BIG can, that I have taken trail-riding in the past. A lot of people I know carry it on their bikes too.



  9. #29
    Join Date
    Jun. 13, 2001
    Location
    Gotham City BEQS/TSAU Clique
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    1,477

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    I also can't believe the local news hasnn't picked up on this: "Heroic Horse Saves Child from Vicious Dog Attack." "Cops Cuff Killer-Dog Owner." "Police KO Illegal Dog-Fight Ring, Details at Eleven."

    Hello, I thought the media just LIVED for this sort of story! And any New Yorker will tell you: Unattended attack dogs and drug dealers often go hand in hand; I've seen that combo for myself.
    ____________

    "It is by no means the privilege of the rider to part with his horse solely by his own will." -- Alois Podhajsky

    "Go on, Bill... This is no place for a pony."

    [This message was edited by InWhyCee on Oct. 11, 2002 at 05:09 PM.]
    \"It is by no means the privilege of the rider to part with his horse solely by his own will.\" -- Alois Podhajsky

    \"Go on, Bill... This is no place for a pony.\"



  10. #30
    Join Date
    Aug. 8, 2002
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    The great Bluegrass State. Or Commonwealth. Whatever.
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    I agree with not stereotyping breeds - just relating my experience. Personally, I'm very close to buying my own stun gun!! If I had been alone when the dog attacked, both my dogs would be dead.

    Thank goodness for good samaritans!

    You win a few, you lose a few. Some get rained out. But you got to dress for all of them. --Satchel Paige
    To be conscious that you are ignorant is a great step to knowledge.



  11. #31
    Join Date
    Feb. 25, 2001
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    You know that place with the nude beaches? Not there.
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    We have a 60 pound bulldog that could seriously mess you up if he weren't a sweetie, and we're fully aware of his capabilities. I've known some sweet pits, but I've known some that weren't cared for properly, and they're positively violent. I've pulled a German Shepard off my dog at he park, and somehow cradled him muzzle first onto the ground until his owner got him. Had it been a Pitbull, I doubt I'd have been able to hold him away.

    "Though you swear that you are true, I still pick my friends over you!"
    Driven insane in the carpool lane...



  12. #32
    Join Date
    Jun. 24, 2002
    Location
    Connecticut
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    172

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    it made me shiver just seeing those pictures!...
    ..and the fact that when I get mad, i get MAD.. so i'll censor myself for those who like pits, but i'm telling you, if I could get my hands on that dog... [img]/infopop/emoticons/icon_mad.gif[/img]

    ... get better soon, though, Lucky!!!! I'm cheering you and your family on! [img]/infopop/emoticons/icon_smile.gif[/img]

    -----------*-----------
    ~*Proud Member of the AQHA, Do It Yourself, Pony Trainers, Luv My Appy, and Tailored Sportsmans Lover Clique [img]/infopop/emoticons/icon_smile.gif[/img]*~



  13. #33
    Join Date
    Jul. 26, 2001
    Location
    Toronto, Canada.
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    6,352

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    (first off a legend LOL, my question mark key doesnt work so É stands for a question mark and * stands for quotations! hehe)

    Im not an expert, but I strongly believe that the Pit Bull is the *breed of choice for backyard breeders* right now. They are cheap, strong and are very easily trainable, making them ideal for guard dogs. Because of their bad rap, people are afraid of the breed, therefore escalating the backyard breeding of them. They are perfect dogs for druglords or anyone who is not wanting unexpected visitors.

    5 years ago it was the Rottweiler that was the breed of choice, 5 years before that it was the Doberman and before that it was the German Sheppard. Now, its common to see a Sheppard as a family pet, even Dobes and Rotties are considered to be safe family dogs. Look back in the newspapers 10 years and you will see people writing in trying to ban Dobermans!

    Anyway, what Im trying to say is that I get very angry when people say *I hate such-and-such* a breed, especially if they have only had 1 or 2 encounters with the breed. I have 1 Staffordshire Bull Terrier and a Greyhoundx Am. Staff. They are both wonderful dogs and have never lifted their lips or growled.

    Im not a *little* dog person. A Jack russel ripped my horses leg apart, she needed 10 stitches. A toy poodle aggressivly attacked my hand and I needed 5 stitches. Oh, and a boarder collie attacked my friends pit bull x Sheppard and the pit had to be euthanized because it was so severly injured. I dont hate these dog breeds because I know dogs act as individuals, totally independent of their breed.

    I find when people stereotype dog breeds, its just as bad as stereotyping people. Just because my dog is a Stafforshire it doesnt mean she is mean. Just because my other dog is a pomeranian doesnt mean he is nice!

    [This message was edited by SquishTheBunny on Oct. 12, 2002 at 02:42 PM.]



  14. #34
    Join Date
    Jul. 26, 2001
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    Toronto, Canada.
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    Just another point. I DO NOT think Pits or ANY BREED should be allowed off leash unless in a designated area. Thats when these things happen. Even the friendliest of dogs can change if scared or antagonized.



  15. #35
    Kasey Guest

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    My daughter, son and I have just finished reading the forum together on Lucky's Pitbull attack. For all of the considerate readers, Lucky is doing much better. We are not using as much SWAT for fly control as through generous donations, Saddleuptack has provided a flysheet and a special mask which covers the majority of the wounds. The children and I are touched by your responses. Please visit Lucky's webpage for a day to day update. If one person or animal is spared an attack through Lucky's experience, then her pain and ours will not be in vain. Thank you all and a special thanks to Marty and Pete who headed Lucky in the right healing direction, Dr. Stephan who put her back together and Susan at Saddleuptack for the web page and immediate shipment of Luckys medical supplies.



  16. #36
    Join Date
    Feb. 25, 2001
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    You know that place with the nude beaches? Not there.
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    We all hope for the best!

    "What kind of scale compares the weight of two beauties, the gravity of duties, or the ground-speed of joy? What kind of gauge can quantify elation? What kind of equation could I possibly employ?"
    Driven insane in the carpool lane...



  17. #37
    Join Date
    Oct. 17, 2000
    Location
    Round Rock ,TX
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    259

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    I hate too see stories like these. No horse, or family deserves that.
    However I am a big fan of 'there are not bad dogs just bad owners'. We have had a pit for two years that has got a bigger heart than any other dog I know.
    So saying that, I hope they really get those owners!

    Erin
    Erin



  18. #38
    Join Date
    Aug. 12, 2001
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    Trailer Trash Ammy!
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    Boy does this one bring back painful memories. Ever seen a grown man terrorized by a 14-year-old girl? Here's what happened.

    Neighbor who raised/trained German Shepherd attack dogs. Normally very closely held in what everybody *thought* was a safe and secure kennel.

    I got off the school bus one afternoon and my big OTTB was not there to meet me at the gate. Something had to be up. I found him behind the barn, in a corner of the pasture, where 2 of the attack dogs had him trapped and were snapping at him. His whole front was bloody, he was white w/ terrified sweat but was still managing to fight them off!

    Parents weren't home, neighbor too far away, nobody to call for help. Well - this horse meant *everything* to me - more, quite literally, than life itself. If those dogs were going to go after anything, I wanted them to go after ME, not my horse. I grabbed my hunting whip and charged in, *screaming* in fury and cracking my whip. Picture Lizviola as Braveheart!!

    Long story short - the element of surprise got 'em - and I think those 2 dogs knew that I would kill them or die trying - they took off. Got my horse to safety, ran for the neighbor's house, didn't even knock, just ran in and started screaming "Your bleepety-bleep dogs just savaged a son of War Admiral! You get the bleepety-bleep VET and you get him RIGHT NOW or so help me I will call the cops, file a report and SUE your bleep for everything you bleepety-bleep HAVE!!"

    The poor guy's face turned white - he called the vet - horse was scarred all over the bottom of his neck and chest, but was fine. And the punchline? Vet said that if the horse had not been a cribber and had not had such heavy muscles in his lower neck, he probably would have died. Funnily enough I've never minded a cribber since then...

    A hint: hunting crops will scare off any dog, any time. I recently whipped a pit bull off my cat with one, and I still carry one when trail riding.

    Member: TB Clique, Georgia Clique, Rust TS Clique, Willem FC, DIY Clique, Ebayers Anonymous Clique, Reads Forums At Work Clique, Lame/Sick/Injured Horse Clique
    "The standard you walk by is the standard you accept."--Lt. Gen. David Morrison, Austalian Army Chief



  19. #39
    Join Date
    Jan. 26, 2000
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    666

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    If dogs are on your property you are well advised to WRITE A LETTER to the owners and send it Certified REturn Receipt Requested. Be direct and to the point that the dogs are not to be on your property again and the owners will beheld responsible for any damage or trauma to your livestock or your family or any other person on your property.

    If you go the "nice guy" route with phone calls or verbal requests - they can deny it. If something happens - they can tell a court - "well they never complained about it before" and try to make a case that you didn't object.

    Dogs can seriously hurt animals and people and dogs running....won't stop unless they are confined...they will continue to follow their own scent for months.

    It's sad that you have to take such measures to tell people to confine there animals. Here in NJ we have a leash law and as farm owners we can legally shoot dogs that are after our livestock - but that isn't always possible if a dog is after your horses.



  20. #40
    Join Date
    Sep. 21, 2001
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    Parker, Colorado
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    2,644

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    Holy moly -- what a terrifying story. Hope poor Lucky continues to recover! I would be interested as to what advice the police gave to do in case of a dog attack.

    By the way, it is illegal to own pit bulls in Denver.
    where are we going, and why am I in this hand basket?



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