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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug. 30, 2001
    Location
    Purcellville, VA
    Posts
    5,930

    Default

    OK, I'm reading about all the fees that people have to pay their trainers at shows, so my question is what do you do?...and this is mostly for the adults, since most juniors have parents footing the bills.

    I hope the juniors will read it and think about their own future for when the 'rents aren't footing the bills anymore.

    How much education do you have? How do you prioritize expenses to afford it? How do you get the time off? Are you self employed? Doctor/Lawyer/Stockbroker etc?

    If you have another budget killer, besides the horses, have you put showing on the back burner?

    I'm assuming that the vast majority of people who show are not of Rockerfeller/Vanderbilt/Carnegie/DuPont/Firestone/pick the family trust fund adults...or ARE there really that many trust fund families out there<g>. If so, I must say, I ADMIRE your ancestors for making a fortune and having the intelligence to manage it well enough to pass it on! Wish mine had been a smidge smarter<g>.

    I have a bachelors degree, and work in the computer industry. I've been doing it long enough to have a comfortable salary, but it isn't a "no budget" sort of comfortable. I'm also married so my husband has an ok salary too, but still not the "no budget" variety.

    I keep my horses at home and only get sporadic lessons, but work hard to ride well and make the rides count.

    I started a business that partially helps finance my horse habit, hence the screenname, I do saddle fittings, flocking and also sell Albion saddles.

    BUT, I also have a budget killer....a son who goes to an independent private school. I could do an A show a month...12 a year if I wasn't financing his excellent education. But, he is worth it and I don't mind just doing an occassional schooling show.

    So, what profession did you choose, why, and has it satisfactorily financed your habit?



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug. 30, 2001
    Location
    Purcellville, VA
    Posts
    5,930

    Default

    OK, I'm reading about all the fees that people have to pay their trainers at shows, so my question is what do you do?...and this is mostly for the adults, since most juniors have parents footing the bills.

    I hope the juniors will read it and think about their own future for when the 'rents aren't footing the bills anymore.

    How much education do you have? How do you prioritize expenses to afford it? How do you get the time off? Are you self employed? Doctor/Lawyer/Stockbroker etc?

    If you have another budget killer, besides the horses, have you put showing on the back burner?

    I'm assuming that the vast majority of people who show are not of Rockerfeller/Vanderbilt/Carnegie/DuPont/Firestone/pick the family trust fund adults...or ARE there really that many trust fund families out there<g>. If so, I must say, I ADMIRE your ancestors for making a fortune and having the intelligence to manage it well enough to pass it on! Wish mine had been a smidge smarter<g>.

    I have a bachelors degree, and work in the computer industry. I've been doing it long enough to have a comfortable salary, but it isn't a "no budget" sort of comfortable. I'm also married so my husband has an ok salary too, but still not the "no budget" variety.

    I keep my horses at home and only get sporadic lessons, but work hard to ride well and make the rides count.

    I started a business that partially helps finance my horse habit, hence the screenname, I do saddle fittings, flocking and also sell Albion saddles.

    BUT, I also have a budget killer....a son who goes to an independent private school. I could do an A show a month...12 a year if I wasn't financing his excellent education. But, he is worth it and I don't mind just doing an occassional schooling show.

    So, what profession did you choose, why, and has it satisfactorily financed your habit?



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun. 26, 2000
    Location
    I live in Chantilly, VA but I ride in Anytown, USA
    Posts
    7,563

    Default

    I'm the Executive Aide to the CEO of a software company.

    If I didn't have a horse, I could live in a really nice house. But, what the heck...there is a sense of luxury to not having a husband or living with someone and spending every dime you earn on yourself and what makes you happy.

    Ahhhhh!

    "If you have the time, spend it. If you have a hand, lend it. If you have the money, give it. If you have a heart, share it." by me



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb. 9, 2001
    Location
    Mudcity, Ontario
    Posts
    587

    Default

    a career yet but I work for a large Mutual Fund company. I work as a customer service rep for most of the day and then cover reception for the last few hours or during vacations. I have my BBA and intend to do some additional schooling. I love that I work for a company that will pay for education.

    My salary pretty much pays for the horse and some bills while my fiance's pays the majority of the bills.

    I have one horse and I ride 5 to 6 times a week. It is a killer on time and thankfully my fiance is understanding. I do show (eventing right now) but it can be hectic around work, making time for him, and trying to pay for it all. I do like though that when I go home I don't worry about work all night.

    http://communities.msn.ca/KristinSaunders/PhotoAlbums



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct. 23, 2000
    Location
    Twin Cities MN
    Posts
    257

    Default

    I let my husband pay for my horse expenses!*G*
    I explained it to him like this..with all the money he spends on them, wouldnt it just be a shame if I was working all the time and didnt go out and enjoy them? Low and behold... he fell for it!LOL

    I work for a medical temp agency(been there for ten years). I pretty much work only enough to keep my employment status up to date. I worked full time when I was first married, and sacrificed ALOT(mac and cheeze every nite for years) to keep my horses. Worked fulltime for a trainer, cleaned barn.ect.. I am blessed by a very kind husband who pays for all of it now becuase he figures it makes me easier to live with, and he enjoys them alot also.

    I still do make sacrifices for my horses,my wardrobe has suffered alot since owning horses, and I have learned how to really shop for the best deals on horse equipment,I buy lots of second hand show clothing,I will spend money on good tack, but take extremely good care of it so it will last forever.



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug. 30, 2001
    Location
    Tennessee
    Posts
    2,505

    Default

    To answer your question I own my own company and do pretty well financially which is nice. However, in order to do that I have to work 60 hour weeks, so between horses and riding (have a hunter and a jumper that I keep at home) I don't have time for anything else! I am lucky in that my husband is VERY supportive of my riding goals and rarely pressures me about spending too much time with horses. Between working and riding two horses almost every day I usually get home at about 10pm every night.

    Some questions for you . . . I have an Albion saddle and love it. How did you become "eligible" to sell Albions? Just curious as it sounds neat!!



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug. 20, 2001
    Posts
    278

    Default

    i am of the weird breed of people who grew up on a horse farm (my parents have a local show/hunt barn with 35 horses), but did not grow up to be a professional. basically, my parents brainwashed/ pressured me to do something other than horses for a living, so that i could afford to compete on the A circut.

    while there have been times i wished i was a professional, i would have to say 11 years later that i definitely made the right decision. i went to Bucknell univ. and got a BA in Economics. i then worked for Andersen Consulting (management/computer consultant) for 10 years and lived in NYC. since my horse always lived at my parents 2 hours outside the city, that meant i was only riding on weekends for that entire time...

    last year i made the big move and quit Andersen and left nyc. i got a job 20 minutes from where my horse lives!! i now work as an internal technology consultant at Deutsche Bank. as for the $$, i am on a strict budget that is made possible since i don't pay board for my horse at my parents farm AND i have no kids...

    it is all worth it though, i now ride at least 5 days a week and many times more than 1 horse. i will be heading to Ocala for my 5th year...



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug. 30, 2001
    Location
    Purcellville, VA
    Posts
    5,930

    Default

    I bought my own first Albion used, and loved it so much that.....

    I found out that they had "sales consultant" positions available. It entailed buying a demo package (minimum 8 saddles) and going up to NY for a week for training in flocking and fitting, and the desire to constantly learn something new when a "difficult to fit" horse comes along. I'm also probably going to go up again and "study" with the VP who has done the British Saddle Fitters certification.

    It is fun, but like any small business, not without its headaches. I love meeting people and fitting horses.

    It does NOT pay all the bills and I can't imagine it being a full time job...not with MY spending habits [img]/infopop/emoticons/icon_eek.gif[/img] . Some of the sales consultants do it full time, they are on the road a lot and really have to work hard, and one nasty customer can almost make a person want to quit.

    I have a LOT more empathy for the tack store owners out there now, and definitely understand why there are so many who won't let you girth a saddle and ride. Everyone wants to try a saddle, but I've run into an amazing number of people who want a discount on a saddle because it was tried by someone else (as in, the billets have girth marks). Many are reasonable and understand that if there is a policy on trying saddles, they might get one that has been tried.

    It is VERY time consuming, and also very seasonal. I love knowing how to flock and fit saddles though, I can adjust my own for my ultra-sensitive mare.

    Mel



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Apr. 19, 2000
    Location
    The Old Dominion
    Posts
    4,405

    Default

    I am a lawyer in Wash. DC. Before I began riding I made a career decision to leave private practice and the big bucks to work inhouse for a trade association. I've never been happier.

    Now that I'm riding I could certainly use a private firm salary, but then I'd never have time to ride. I'd rather budget and actually be able to get to the barn.

    I'm married but with no children - that also helps the financing front.

    I don't have the $$ to start showing right now b/c we are supporting my monster-in-law. Once she kicks the bucket we'll have a lot more financial freedom. [img]/infopop/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif[/img]

    "There's something about the outside of a horse that's good for the inside of a man."

    -- Winston Churchill
    ___________________________
    Age is a very high price to pay for maturity.



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Feb. 21, 2001
    Location
    VA/MD.. Uk.. Spain.. or a somewhere in between.
    Posts
    864

    Default

    I suck up to mommy [img]/infopop/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif[/img]

    Well, and my neighbor with two horses who I spend every evening working out in her barn for, but that *was* going towards a car, until my mother cajoled (is that how you spell it? [img]/infopop/emoticons/icon_confused.gif[/img] ) my into purchasing a new laptop with it [img]/infopop/emoticons/icon_rolleyes.gif[/img]

    *Cass*

    <~><*><~>

    Fearfully, only time will tell, for it is all a leap of faith...

    Life is not a spectator sport!

    Smile...it makes people wonder what you have been doing [img]/infopop/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif[/img]
    Jocelyn
    ______________________

    I take a chance, and steal away this movie moment -Mae



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Feb. 8, 2000
    Location
    Southern Maryland
    Posts
    1,363

    Default

    Well, I'm a Captain in the Air Force, so you can look up how much (little?) I make.

    I was lucky to get a full scholarship, so at least I don't have student loans to pay for, unlike my husband. Jack works also. I'm an Industrial Engineer with a BS, and 1/2 way through my MS in Systems Engineering. Don't really use either one at work where I'm a Manpower Officer (Kinda like Human Resources in the civilian world.) Jack is a Financial Manager, BA type, and works for the military too, but has long hair. [img]/infopop/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif[/img]

    Between the two of us, we're comfortable, but not extravagant. No kids helps too.

    One bad side of the AF is I have to move every 2-3 years, so keeping the horsie at home is a dream for retirement (just 10 more years.... [img]/infopop/emoticons/icon_wink.gif[/img] ) So boarding, eats up a bunch of my spare horsie cash. Add the care and training during the "business trips" I have to take, and that's a bit o' money.

    I haven't started showing here yet, hopefully in the spring...we'll see how far I can stretch that Captain's pay... [img]/infopop/emoticons/icon_rolleyes.gif[/img]
    - Therese

    "I may not have gone where I intended to go, but I think I have ended up where I needed to be." - Douglas Adams



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Dec. 30, 2000
    Location
    Camden, SC
    Posts
    1,644

    Default

    That's how I'm paying for a good percentage of everything now..

    Eventually, I'd like to get my commissioned portrait business off the ground - I've stalled out currently due to having sold my entire portfolio after high school and not being able to find the dang slides of anything. Argh! I want to do pet portraits in between showing, but my trainer keeps insisting I set up a Horse Psychology tent, complete with giant-size Freud couch, to psychoanalyse everyone between classes [img]/infopop/emoticons/icon_wink.gif[/img]

    I pay for coaching and trailering by being a barn slave, but that's just a given.. I'd do that even if I was financially independent/free
    ---------
    Delighted Studios - I\'m not too proud to beg.



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jul. 17, 2000
    Location
    charlotte, NC USA
    Posts
    4,178

    Default

    I'm a grad students, previously a designer and I've never made enough $ (yet!) to own a horse. Luckily, I've happened upon a good lease deal, and now I pretty much work off my riding by teaching beginner riding lessons where I ride. Any money I have left over will go to lessons or competeing or whatnot.

    If you have a tight budget, a lease is good - it gets you in the saddle, while not holding you responsible for huge expenses (I pay a percentage of board, shoeing, and vet care).

    When grad school is all over and I'm a decently paid planner, I hope to buy a horse, and keep teaching my Saturday lessons.

    I never plan on wearing fancy clothes or driving a new car. I also have a feeling most of my vacations will be spent in a tent [img]/infopop/emoticons/icon_wink.gif[/img]

    The witchy witch witch of south central NC.
    The witchy witch witch of south central NC.



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Dec. 19, 2000
    Location
    Heaven - Rappahannock County, Virginia
    Posts
    1,834

    Default

    my clients are primarily non-profit groups, foundations, and associations. some of my sites are www.familyplanet.org, www.awf.org, www.youthactionnet.org, www.lachealthaccounts.org/en/index.php, www.synergyaids.org, www.worldbank.org/wbi/healthflagship

    pretty dreamy job, 6 blocks from the house, great clients, great causes. not a huge paycheck, but i get to design and direct, it pays the bill and i feel pretty good about our work.

    -jacksmom
    * trying hard to be the person that my horses think i am



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Nov. 19, 2001
    Location
    Northern Virginia, U.S.A.
    Posts
    1,310

    Default

    Great topic, SaddleFitter!

    I work in the political field, from the campaign/fundraising/public affairs side of things, not the policy/legislative side. I have a B.A. and never went to grad school.

    Now in my early 30s, I finally have the financial security to ride seriously again. However, I find that I have to keep away from the tack shops to avoid temptation, and it boils down to choices: me vs. the horse. And the horse ALWAYS gets the better end of the deal! [img]/infopop/emoticons/icon_smile.gif[/img]

    I live in an older house in an older neighborhood (which I try to keep clean myself, NOT!), but he lives in a new house in a nice neighborhood and has a staff to care for him! Do I buy the brand new suit for work, or deck him out in a toasty high-tech Rambo Wug? I haven't been to a proper salon for haircut/highlights/manicure in months, but his toes are taken care of every 4-6 weeks, he's thoroughly groomed 5 days a week with the right equipment, and Cowboy Magic brings out his highlights, etc. etc. [img]/infopop/emoticons/icon_smile.gif[/img] Besides, a clean healthy happy horse gives me far more satisfaction than any manicure that chips after 4 days. It's all about priorities, I can't afford to pamper me and him, so my money pays to pamper him as best I can.

    My biggest problem is that I am a stickler for quality over quantity (I would rather have one nice item than multiple not-so-nice items) and that can be expensive when it comes to big ticket items. For example, I own only one bridle, but it's an Edgewood. My guy is green and we haven't shown this year, but we'll start showing next spring and I'll need to get some new custom boots for myself (the soles on my Dehner's from my college days are beyond repair)so we'll wait to show until I can afford to turn myself out properly (or what is "proper" according to me). My intent here is not to sound like a name-brand snob; I'll take a quality bargain when I see it, but if I am going to do the "horse show thing" I want to do it right, and if it means waiting to do it right, then it will be all the more worth it.

    Getting back to the career thing, the issue of time more than anything held me back from riding in my 20s. I was so busy working hard to establish myself, there would have been no time to care for a horse. Now that I have worked hard, gotten to a more secure salary level and can afford it, it makes my time with my horse that much more special!



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Feb. 18, 2000
    Posts
    282

    Default

    I'm a teacher (Masters) so that has it's financial limitations but the summer is great for riding, Husband makes OK $ also but certainly not enough to "do" the A circuit. I might get to one or two B rated (they may be A's, I don't know) show a year. Otherwise, it is the local circuit, day shows for me (and only a few of those). I keep my horses at home and have had my show clothes for 10 years!! I must say, those TS last forever. We also don't have any biped children.



  17. #17
    Join Date
    Sep. 16, 1999
    Location
    Ohio: Charter Member - COTH Hockey Clique & COTH Buffy Clique
    Posts
    9,143

    Default

    Therese... you need to get sent over this direction! I could always use a new buddy at the Wright-Patt stables. [img]/infopop/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif[/img]

    I work on computers for a regional department store and love it! Which is good because I get paid decently and am something of a tree-hugger. It pays the bills, although due to some p*ss poor decisions, barely with the credit cards (I'm working on it!!)... but does allow me to show quite a bit. We ended up competing at 7 horse trials plus the three-day last season. I'm still paying the vet, but that's ok. I don't have a new car (drive my 93 truck every day) and live in a 1 bedroom apartment... but it works.

    If Dressage is a Symphony... Eventing is Rock & Roll!
    ************
    "Of course it's hard. It's supposed to be hard. It's the Hard that makes it great."

    "Get up... Get out... Get Drunk. Repeat as needed." -- Spike



  18. #18
    Join Date
    Sep. 19, 2001
    Location
    NYC!!!
    Posts
    202

    Default

    I'm lucky enough to have parents that have/will support anywhere from three to five horses (usually one that doesn't show, but board is a *!(<&) on the A circuit, and frankly, I'm getting SCARED!! I have three/four years before I go to college, and my wonderful parents have agreed [even encouraged) to support me [they did for my brother as well) to take one/two gap years to show ao plus jumpers and travel, but there isn't a day that goes by when I don't think "what happens then"? i'm looking at colleges in urban but horse friendly areas, but I'm not sure if I can ride through college. I know I won't even think about going pro.

    The way I got into this VERY fortunate situation was by having a father that worked 100 hour weeks, could I do that? would I be miserable? It would be worth not doing what I want to do if I could have horses, but would I be shortchanging them/me? What good is having them if I have no free time to see them? then I'm not their friend, i'm their owner. yuck. ahhhh. Let me just say how much I respect all of you and admire you for finding a way to balance horses/work. I can only hope that I am able to do such a good job when I have to.

    charter memeber, Thread Killers Anonymous
    (yes, this means you should yell at me when my posts are too long, and bump threads that I kill)

    "People come and go in this Forest, and they say, 'It's only Eeyore, so it doesn't count.' They walk to and fro saying 'Ha Ha!'. BUMP MY POSTS!!!
    charter memeber, Thread Killers Anonymous
    (yes, this means you should yell at me when my posts are too long, and bump threads that I kill)

    \"People come and go in this Forest, and they say, \'It\'s only Eeyore, so it doesn\'t count.\' They walk to and



  19. #19
    Join Date
    Jun. 13, 2000
    Posts
    1,729

    Default

    I am an accountant. My current job allows me to ride my horses during the week and pays all my horse expenses. I can afford to show a lot &
    pay all my bills. My job also provides a large chunk of money every year for retirement. My dilemma is that I am bored and I want to find a new challenge. But the interviews I have been on, require tons of overtime. they are good jobs with more upward mobility than I can get at my
    current job, but I probably would not get to ride that much. ANY ADVICE FROM ANYONE? Stay at a comfortable job and ride a lot or move to
    a more challenging position, but then I would not be able to ride that much? riding is very important to me.



  20. #20
    Join Date
    Oct. 5, 1999
    Location
    A place called vertigo
    Posts
    12,428

    Default

    <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Inverness:

    I'm married but with no children

    <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

    Husband + Billy = 2 kids!

    Use the Force.



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