The Chronicle of the Horse
MagazineNewsHorse SportsHorse CareCOTH StoreVoicesThe Chronicle UntackedDirectoriesMarketplaceDates & Results
 
Page 6 of 6 FirstFirst ... 456
Results 101 to 107 of 107
  1. #101
    Join Date
    Oct. 5, 1999
    Location
    A place called vertigo
    Posts
    12,607

    Default

    But a horse does lower his croup when he is just about to take off in front of a jump.

    Anyone who has ever played a sport knows that you do lots of drills and exercises that help you attain strength and fitness as well as improve coordination. The same thing with horses - you ride them in different frames depending on what you are trying to accomplish at any given moment. You don't always ride as you would in the show ring, or really forward or really collected, but a combination of them to focus and correct your horse's weaknesses.

    Use the Force.



  2. #102
    Join Date
    Jan. 24, 2000
    Location
    Boulder
    Posts
    3,500

    Default

    Yes, absolutely. There are plenty of holes in Littauer's theories. Another is when he claims the piaffe is not engaged at all (because the hind legs aren't tracking up?) and says the picture of the three year old greenie trotting on the forehand is far more engaged than the piaffe. It is an interesting book. I wish the ODG was around today--I'd love to take him on.

    Kathy Johnson Dressage



  3. #103
    Join Date
    Mar. 14, 2000
    Location
    WA. The Evergreen State Where The Horses Are Forever Green
    Posts
    17,256

    Default

    This is an interesting thread to bring back [img]/infopop/emoticons/icon_wink.gif[/img]

    "Proud Member Of The I Loff Starman Babies Clique"



  4. #104
    Join Date
    Nov. 2, 2001
    Location
    Packing my bags
    Posts
    33,612

    Default

    <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by rileyt:
    Whew! Thought that would get your attention! OK. Really not trying to start a fight, but provoke a good discussion. As some of you may know, I just returned from riding in Germany, and I saw lots of things there that made me think. Here is one. Recently, I think, despite good horses and good riders, the US has been only mildly successful in International Show Jumping. The Germans, on the other hand, have done quite well. I had a chance to attend a smallish show, and watched several jumper classes. Even in the 3 foot divisions, I saw almost NONE of the scary riding I see at the lower level A jumper shows here. The horses were 99% warmbloods. And went almost EXCLUSIVELY in SNAFFLES. I saw ONE gag, and ONE pelham the entire day. One thing I noticed... all of these competitors, even at the lower divisions... could have ridden a solid 1st level dressage test in a heartbeat. The horses went in much more of a frame, were far more engaged, and the riders rode more vertically and less forward than here. There is no "hunter" division in Germany. When the riders warmed up, they did "dressage"... in a first or second level frame. Now, I know some very good hunter and jumper riders whose "flatwork" really is "dressage". But I know far more whose "flatwork" consists of walk-trot-canter in a hunter frame... with an occasional smaller circle, or turn on the forehand, or shoulder-in. I'm just wondering if there's a connection.

    Do Germans learn how to engage a horse's hind end and RIDE the horse better than us?

    Is it because they are taught "dressage"? Instead of aimlessly cantering circles and calling it flatwork?

    Is the hunter "frame" (a longer, lower, more forward moving gait) and style a detriment when our hunter riders switch over to jumpers?

    Thoughts?

    Please don't blast me for picking on hunters... I think they have their place, and no one would fox hunt in a second-level dressage frame! But I'm wondering if the fact that most of the country starts with hunters ends up hurting us when they try to transition to jumpers.<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

    I have not made my way through all the posts, I am jumping in from the top so to speak.

    Having had my start in riding in Germany I can tell you there aree a few things that are totaly different.

    We don't start out as Jumpers - just like that old movie: You have to learn how to walk before you can fly! There is no such thing as riding for a few month and then being let loose on the jumps. First you learn to master your horse - in *Dressage seat* the two point is reserved for when you are out in the field - after you had plenty of lessons and shown that you can be let out of the arena.
    Getting to jump is a mile stone - not getting to canter [img]/infopop/emoticons/icon_smile.gif[/img]

    Before you can get to anytype of show - lowest level ( category C excluded) you need to take a test for the Riding Badge in bronce - a low level Dressage test, including medium trot and canter, and lead change through walk, backing up a length, a volte. And then you get to jump a course - I don't know how high, but I'd guess near the 3' markmaybe a little lower (but not much)

    There are no W/T classes there are junior classes, a glorified lesson set up, you just don't get corrected (in the group) and intro dressage 9for juniors usually - who'd want to ride around with kids for a show carrier in groups of four, still including a lengthening of the canter.


    As wether the Hunters are the death of the Jumpers - I don't know.
    In the past there have been many US riders who are just sweet to watch, light and forward, Joe Fargis, Conrad Homefeld, Anne Kursinski, to name the ones I can remeber, and they kicked butt when they apeared on the international stage!

    But now they seem to ride so *German*, hanging on the bit, ever more gadgets put on the horse....or if they do ride nice, they lack IMHO the proper horsemanship, the care one ought to have dealing with a living creature.

    Seems to be connected with the problems VIriding academy sees in the sport....

    [This message was edited by Alagirl on Dec. 04, 2002 at 03:12 PM.]
    Quote Originally Posted by Bristol Bay View Post
    Try setting your broomstick to fly at a lower altitude.



  5. #105
    Join Date
    Dec. 12, 2000
    Location
    Washington, D.C., U.S.A.
    Posts
    4,155

    Default

    Bumpkin! What are you DOING??? Don't you know I can only be responsible for stirring the pot on so many threads at once? Someone will have to sit-in for me... I'm busy making trouble on the dressage forum. [img]/infopop/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif[/img]

    Half of Riding is 30% mental ... no wonder there are so many bad riders [img]/infopop/emoticons/icon_rolleyes.gif[/img]



  6. #106
    Join Date
    Nov. 23, 1999
    Location
    South Coast Plaza
    Posts
    20,490

    Default

    I always cringe when you see kids being told "Extend the trot" and think it means Go Faster, or "sitting trot," which means do the Western Pleasure Jog.

    "Bridle up" always gets me as well.
    EDDIE WOULD GO



  7. #107
    Join Date
    Mar. 14, 2000
    Location
    WA. The Evergreen State Where The Horses Are Forever Green
    Posts
    17,256

    Default

    I watched someone last night, for the millionth time trot around quite quickly thinking she was doing an extended trot, when her horse was all strung out and looked as though he was going to plow his nose through the arena footing.

    "Proud Member Of The I Loff Starman Babies Clique"



Similar Threads

  1. any American Breds in Dressage/Jumping/Eventing at WEG?
    By D_BaldStockings in forum Sport Horse Breeding
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: Aug. 20, 2010, 03:00 PM
  2. Bridging Flatwork to Jumping Clinic in Wake Forest, NC
    By displacedyank in forum Eventing
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: Oct. 6, 2009, 07:07 AM
  3. Ratio of Dressage to Flatwork/Jumping lessons
    By Whisper in forum Eventing
    Replies: 15
    Last Post: Oct. 19, 2008, 03:24 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
randomness