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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar. 14, 2000
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    WA. The Evergreen State Where The Horses Are Forever Green
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    What Happens When You Fall Without a Helmet:

    If you were to take a fall from your horse and land on your head without a helmet, your head which would contain a great deal of kinetic (in motion) energy would strike the hard ground and a good deal of that energy would then transfer back to your head in a great shock to your brain. Hard ground is a poor energy shock absorber, but rather more of a shock reflector.

    This would be like hitting a telephone pole with a baseball bat. The pole can't absorb the kinetic energy of the moving bat, so the pole reflects the energy back into the bat and back up your arms. This is what you don't want to happen when trying to prevent a head injury. You want the energy to leave your head and move into the ground at a rate that the ground can absorb it at.

    Neither your head or the ground compress very well and therefore the impact energy is transferred from your head to the ground over a very small amount of physical displacement, or movement. This rapid deceleration of your skull hitting the ground means that your brain which is floating in a fluid can slam into the inside of your skull and become bruised, resulting in a concussion.

    How a Helmet Works:

    Helmets are made up of a hard outer shell and a firm, but compressible inner liner normally made from polystyrene. The outer shell is designed to stay in shape in a fall and not deform upon impact. This causes the energy of the helmet contacting the ground not to be focused on a small local area of the helmet, but to be spread out over the entire surface of the helmet where it contacts the ground.

    Between your head and the hard outer shell is a polystyrene foam layer. This layer is designed to compress at a predetermined rate when the helmet strikes the ground. This compression rate is designed to decelerate (slow) your head at a rate that doesn't cause your brain to strike the inside of your skull. This is similar to an airbag in your car. It inflates just before you hit it and then deinflates as your body presses into it, thereby slowing your forward motion so you don't slam into the steering wheel. Additionally, the force of your head upon the foam compresses the foam and this converts the kinetic energy of your head into mechanical energy (compressing foam) and then into heat which is quickly dissipated.

    Accidents:

    Once a helmet has been used in an accident and the inner liner of foam has become compressed in even a small amount it must be replaced or rebuilt with a new foam liner, or next time there will be less non-compressed foam to absorb the energy and the shock to your head will be greater.

    Aging:

    The materials that make up a helmet over time can become compromised due to daily use, ozone and other environmental forces causing them to become weakened. Old helmets should be replaced, or they could fail when called upon.



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar. 14, 2000
    Location
    WA. The Evergreen State Where The Horses Are Forever Green
    Posts
    17,256

    Default

    What Happens When You Fall Without a Helmet:

    If you were to take a fall from your horse and land on your head without a helmet, your head which would contain a great deal of kinetic (in motion) energy would strike the hard ground and a good deal of that energy would then transfer back to your head in a great shock to your brain. Hard ground is a poor energy shock absorber, but rather more of a shock reflector.

    This would be like hitting a telephone pole with a baseball bat. The pole can't absorb the kinetic energy of the moving bat, so the pole reflects the energy back into the bat and back up your arms. This is what you don't want to happen when trying to prevent a head injury. You want the energy to leave your head and move into the ground at a rate that the ground can absorb it at.

    Neither your head or the ground compress very well and therefore the impact energy is transferred from your head to the ground over a very small amount of physical displacement, or movement. This rapid deceleration of your skull hitting the ground means that your brain which is floating in a fluid can slam into the inside of your skull and become bruised, resulting in a concussion.

    How a Helmet Works:

    Helmets are made up of a hard outer shell and a firm, but compressible inner liner normally made from polystyrene. The outer shell is designed to stay in shape in a fall and not deform upon impact. This causes the energy of the helmet contacting the ground not to be focused on a small local area of the helmet, but to be spread out over the entire surface of the helmet where it contacts the ground.

    Between your head and the hard outer shell is a polystyrene foam layer. This layer is designed to compress at a predetermined rate when the helmet strikes the ground. This compression rate is designed to decelerate (slow) your head at a rate that doesn't cause your brain to strike the inside of your skull. This is similar to an airbag in your car. It inflates just before you hit it and then deinflates as your body presses into it, thereby slowing your forward motion so you don't slam into the steering wheel. Additionally, the force of your head upon the foam compresses the foam and this converts the kinetic energy of your head into mechanical energy (compressing foam) and then into heat which is quickly dissipated.

    Accidents:

    Once a helmet has been used in an accident and the inner liner of foam has become compressed in even a small amount it must be replaced or rebuilt with a new foam liner, or next time there will be less non-compressed foam to absorb the energy and the shock to your head will be greater.

    Aging:

    The materials that make up a helmet over time can become compromised due to daily use, ozone and other environmental forces causing them to become weakened. Old helmets should be replaced, or they could fail when called upon.



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun. 9, 2001
    Location
    Calgary, Alberta, Canada, North America, Earth
    Posts
    1,078

    Default

    Thanks for the great info!! [img]/infopop/emoticons/icon_smile.gif[/img]

    ***~~~Bucksnort~~~***
    You can have my boyfriend, but stay away from my horse.



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov. 21, 2000
    Location
    ~Santa Barbara County~ CA Clique, Vertically Gifted Clique & AAAA Clique
    Posts
    3,914

    Default

    That was great!

    By the way, with my new gift certificate I can finally afford an approved helmet! Yay!!!!! There is no way I should be riding my crazy beastie without something seriously protective on my nogin (full body armour would be nice too, hehe)!



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov. 1, 1999
    Location
    Someplace Wet
    Posts
    7,763

    Default

    Science Rules! [img]/infopop/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif[/img] [img]/infopop/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif[/img] [img]/infopop/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif[/img]

    _\\]
    -- * > hoopoe
    Snowmen fall from heaven unassembled.
    _\\\\]
    -- * > hoopoe

    www.meanderingwa.blogspot.com



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct. 12, 1999
    Location
    Belchertown, MA
    Posts
    684

    Default

    I was just talking with some of my students about why they shouldn't place their helmet on thier saddle racks because they can fall off onto the hard ground and become damaged and that they need to replace their helmets every so often due to falls or age of the helmet. They all looked at me like I had two heads. You, however, have managed to summarize what happens to helmets wonderfully and I hope you do not mind if I attempt to print out your post and hand it to all my students and parents. THANK YOU BUMKIN!!!



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct. 5, 1999
    Location
    \"in the wind, and rain, looking for the sun..................\"
    Posts
    3,439

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    Thank you so much Bumpkin/Mr. Bumpkin. I remember reading somewhere, about motor cycle helmets, same thing. They were telling people that if you had been in an accident, your helmet needed replacement. It makes perfect sense. Once used in head protection, it would be weakened. Therefore, needing replacement.

    How many times have we seen helmets perform, and get reused? Expense is something none of us like to hear, but when it comes to safety, it's the one thing we need to forget.



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar. 14, 2000
    Location
    WA. The Evergreen State Where The Horses Are Forever Green
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    Default

    Mr Bumpkin actually sat down and typed the whole thing out and I just pushed Post Now.

    Maybe we can get him to design a helmet that would be approved and yet "fashionable"!!! [img]/infopop/emoticons/icon_smile.gif[/img]

    He thinks we should wear helmets just like motorcycle or football helmets to be honest.

    He has pointed out that Knight's did that [img]/infopop/emoticons/icon_wink.gif[/img]



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Oct. 8, 2000
    Location
    East of LA-LA Land, Calif.
    Posts
    10,288

    Default

    <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR> "Maybe we can get him to design a helmet that would be approved and yet fashionable." <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

    Oh yes, please! Maybe one we can accessorize?

    I love the scientific explanation. Your husband expresses himself very well in such matters. It appears we married the same type of man. [img]/infopop/emoticons/icon_wink.gif[/img] [img]/infopop/emoticons/icon_wink.gif[/img]

    "Friends don't let friends eat fish tacos."



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Mar. 16, 2000
    Location
    Chatham, NY USA
    Posts
    4,100

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    If you-all recall, at least one report of Princess Di's accident described cause of death as EXACTLY what Mr. Bumpkin described.
    www.ayliprod.com
    Equine Photography in the Northeast



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Oct. 5, 1999
    Location
    A place called vertigo
    Posts
    12,396

    Default

    How old is old?

    Use the Force. ABBA rocks. Just say "NO" to Farrah hair.



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Oct. 5, 1999
    Location
    \"in the wind, and rain, looking for the sun..................\"
    Posts
    3,439

    Default

    Flash, if you're asking, it already sounds like it's too old. Plus with the synthetic materials, their lifespan is dependent on care, climate, use etc...



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Oct. 2, 1999
    Location
    Mendocino County, CA: Turkey Vulture HQ
    Posts
    14,295

    Default

    <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Flash44:
    How old is old?
    <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

    The manufacturers say 5 years.
    If you are allergic to a thing, it is best not to put that thing in your mouth, particularly if the thing is cats. - Lemony Snicket



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Sep. 27, 2000
    Location
    Southern California - on a freeway someplace
    Posts
    9,625

    Default

    Thanks to Mr. Bumpkin for "The Physics of Helmets." May I use as is for my next newsletter? It is a newsletter for a local chapter of a state dressage association.
    The Evil Chem Prof



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Mar. 14, 2000
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    WA. The Evergreen State Where The Horses Are Forever Green
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    Default

    Email me please, if you would like his real name for the article. [img]/infopop/emoticons/icon_smile.gif[/img]



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Nov. 19, 2000
    Location
    The Southern California freeway system, stuck in an endless commute
    Posts
    5,902

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    I kinda like "Mr. Bumpkin" as his pen name. [img]/infopop/emoticons/icon_smile.gif[/img]

    ***I see trees of green, red roses too. I watch 'em bloom for me and for you. And I think to myself ... what a wonderful world. Yes, what a wonderful world." -- Louie Armstrong.***
    Congratulate me! My CANTER cutie is an honor student at Goofball University!



  17. #17
    Join Date
    Mar. 14, 2000
    Location
    WA. The Evergreen State Where The Horses Are Forever Green
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    I think your right [img]/infopop/emoticons/icon_smile.gif[/img]
    Mr Bumpkin does have a certain "ring" of intelligence, and knowledge to it!!! [img]/infopop/emoticons/icon_smile.gif[/img]



  18. #18
    Join Date
    Feb. 7, 2000
    Location
    Nottingham, UK
    Posts
    1,356

    Default

    Could my pony club have permission to use it too? Please? And I'll go with the Mr. Bumpkin, or perhaps Dr. Bumpkin would sound cooler?

    Aleesha



  19. #19
    Join Date
    Nov. 1, 1999
    Location
    Someplace Wet
    Posts
    7,763

    Default

    Professor Bumpkin.


    Science marches on!

    _\\]
    -- * > hoopoe
    Snowmen fall from heaven unassembled.
    _\\\\]
    -- * > hoopoe

    www.meanderingwa.blogspot.com



  20. #20
    Join Date
    Mar. 14, 2000
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    WA. The Evergreen State Where The Horses Are Forever Green
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    Mr Bumpkin liked the Mr Bumpkin name!! [img]/infopop/emoticons/icon_smile.gif[/img]



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