The Chronicle of the Horse
MagazineNewsHorse SportsHorse CareCOTH StoreVoicesThe Chronicle UntackedDirectoriesMarketplaceDates & Results
 
Results 1 to 15 of 15
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan. 27, 2006
    Location
    Southern Wisconsin
    Posts
    1,428

    Default Can I jump with no leg pressure: 2 days to learn to jump without knee pain!

    I'm totally nuts right now so I'm just going to put that out right away:-) I have my first combined test with my newly started mare in 4 days. I dislocated my knew a couple of weeks ago and just got back in the saddle yesterday. It's sore but manageable. Canter hurts like the dickens. Tried a crossrail and OUCH!! I can chug ibuprofen (anti drug people turn away!) and probably suck it up. However, any techniques to hop over crossrails that don't involve weight in my stirrups? It's the weight that causes the shooting pain. I'm going to do it in my dressage saddle with a longer than normal stirrup but if you have any tips for how to successfully fling myself over a fence without interfering with my poor tolerant greenie please let me know! And at least jingle alot for me on Sunday! :-D LOL
    "We don't stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing."



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec. 20, 2003
    Location
    N. Augusta, SC (but forever a BUCKEYE!)
    Posts
    1,809

    Default

    Honestly...since this is a newly started, green horse's first combined test, you haven't been able to ride her because of her injury, and you can't give her the ride you usually give her, I'd call it a wash, get yourself healed, and try again at a later time.

    Especially with a green horse, I think you owe them the best experience you can give.
    Random horse pics http://www.flickr.com/photos/glfprncs/
    Talk to me about fitness or nutrition (I'm an A.C.E. Certified Personal Trainer)!
    My blog! http://personalsweatequity.blogspot.com/



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul. 19, 2003
    Location
    Middleburg, VA
    Posts
    13,799

    Default

    I wouldn't do it. No reason to give a green horose anything less than a good ride, and you aren't strong enough to do it.

    I've been there. I sprained my ankle 2 days before the first event of the season a couple of years ago. I attempted to ride the day after the injury...I couldn't get on without shooting pain (right ankle) and flexing my ankle enough to get it in the stirrup, ouch. I picked up the trot, and immediately pulled up. Not worth it.

    We survived. We missed that event, but a good xc school got us prepared for the move up that came after and we did fine. There will always be another show, and especially with a greenie, better to wait than have a bad outing.



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb. 26, 2007
    Location
    Bronx, NY/Atlanta, GA/Fort Dodge, IA
    Posts
    3,530

    Default

    I wouldn't do it, either.

    But what I did do in a slightly different scenario (not a green horse, and more than two days) when I needed to keep riding after a sprained ankle was to rest the ankle for a couple of days and then do all my riding for the next few weeks without stirrups.
    Founder, Higher Standards Leather Care Addicts Anonymous
    Capitalization is the difference between helping your Uncle Jack off a horse and helping your uncle jack off a horse.



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan. 19, 2005
    Location
    PA
    Posts
    13,777

    Default

    sorry....I'll add a 3rd or 4th voice to the don't do it camp.

    If your horse was hurt and not able to go the way they normally do...would you still be entering?

    I absolutely understand sucking it up with a little pain. But if you can not ride effectively....it isn't worth it for just a show. With a green horse, it is all about giving them the right experience. If you can not ride the way you need to and have to compensate so much for an injury (or illness).....either scratch the horse or let someone else ride her.

    Good luck! There WILL be another show.
    Last edited by bornfreenowexpensive; May. 17, 2012 at 11:51 AM.
    ** The difference between genius and stupidity is genius has its limits. -- Albert Einstein **



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun. 25, 2004
    Location
    Carolinas
    Posts
    5,317

    Default

    Another vote to stay at home, allow the knee to heal. You won't be able to give your greenie your best ride - which she deserves. There will be other shows and you both will be better prepared.
    "Never do anything that you have to explain twice to the paramedics."
    Courtesy my cousin Tim



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan. 27, 2006
    Location
    Southern Wisconsin
    Posts
    1,428

    Default

    Thanks guys! I'm going to take her for the experience and I can ride the dressage. If I still can't manage to get weight in it over jumps I'll just have to scratch after dressage. Heavy sigh. I was hoping there was some way to get over the jumps without torquing my knee. She's a safe and honest little greenie and it's fine doing walk/trot so we can at least go have a little fun and if it's too sore to jump I'll just pull out. Thanks for the support guys!
    "We don't stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing."



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan. 25, 2011
    Location
    NC
    Posts
    2,341

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Keg-A-Bacchus View Post
    Thanks guys! I'm going to take her for the experience and I can ride the dressage. If I still can't manage to get weight in it over jumps I'll just have to scratch after dressage. Heavy sigh. I was hoping there was some way to get over the jumps without torquing my knee. She's a safe and honest little greenie and it's fine doing walk/trot so we can at least go have a little fun and if it's too sore to jump I'll just pull out. Thanks for the support guys!
    Are you comfortable jumping her without stirrups? That's what I did with my young one after I busted my leg. Otherwise, just go enjoy your dressage test and heal up that knee!
    Trying a life outside of FEI tents and hotel rooms.



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan. 27, 2006
    Location
    Southern Wisconsin
    Posts
    1,428

    Default

    I haven't tried on her! But I've jumped bareback lots! Hmmm...perhaps I'll give it a try tomorrow! It's just the pressure of landing that sends sharp shooting pains through it. I managed a bit better today and she's so stinkin' tolerant of me! I just slow trotted up, grabbed mane, gripped with my knees (naughty I know! LOL) and all was good until I absorbed the landing in my knee. Perhaps I'll try no stirrups as I think this pain won't be gone for a loooooong time. Stupid stupid stupid knee!!! Grrrrrrrrrr!!! :-(
    "We don't stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing."



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jun. 24, 2011
    Posts
    24

    Default

    If you can ride dressage without pain do it so she gets more experience in the environment.

    If you posted that your horse had an injury and asked how to ride her anyway you would be flamed off the planet - why do the same thing to yourself and risk further injury and a bad outing for your horse? Also, why ask her to change everything you've taught her and worked towards 2 days before an event. You are a team and if either is not up to the task you should call it day and move on with healing.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Sep. 15, 2008
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    1,470

    Default

    Since we aren't going to stop you from going (Coming from a person who rode their dirt bike with broken leg/pins/knee brace 2 weeks after surgery), How about those bendy stirrups http://www.smartpakequine.com/ums-sy...x?cm_vc=Search.
    Someone told me to use them with my bad ankles. Never tried them though so can't say how they work. I was told they would take some of the pressure off my ankles and knees when I rode.



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jan. 27, 2006
    Location
    Southern Wisconsin
    Posts
    1,428

    Default

    Good point. I'd never ask her to go with knee pain:-). I'll just have to do dressage and unless a miracle happens and the pain subsides I'll just bow out of jumping. She's a very honest, calm little pumpkin so I'll just give her my best for dressage and then cheer everyone else on in jumping! I'm glad I'm still going to get her out and about. It's so bizarre. It feels completely fine walking on foot and horse, trotting, squating and bending. But that last second of the jump and YOWZA! So frustrating. Oh well. Perhaps eventing isn't in our forseeable future and dressage will be on the summer schedule. Hrumph. (Furrows brow, sticks out lip, crosses arms and plops down defeated on the couch).
    "We don't stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing."



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jul. 25, 2003
    Location
    Boston Area
    Posts
    8,776

    Default

    My trainer drilled into me early on that my responsibility as a rider was making the rides good for my horse.

    I think you can get a lot of good experience by taking to the two-phase and exposing her to the environment. Riding the dressage test doesn't sound like a problem. But unless you know you can give her the ride she needs over fences, I'd skip that part.

    IME, one bad ride can put you back several steps.
    Equine Ink - My soapbox for equestrian writings & reviews.
    EquestrianHow2 - Operating instructions for your horse.



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jun. 30, 2009
    Posts
    6,997

    Default

    Agree have someone else jump her until your knee is healed - as in you're no longer even thinking about flinching!

    Better not to jump for a few weeks than to get her into all sorts of habits that will need to be corrected later on.



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Apr. 20, 2009
    Location
    Raeford, North Carolina
    Posts
    3,174

    Default

    Sorry OP. I think the resounding voice of reason is to leave this show alone. Maybe if you guys were a seasoned combination and this was "old hat", but like the above poster said your newly started mare really needs you to be there for her. Show energy is A LOT different than schooling at home energy. IF you're relying on grip and motrin to get you through it then you're doing it for you and not her.

    Don't mean to be harsh, but when you ask for input . . .
    "Drawing on my fine command of the English language, I said nothing" - Robert Benchley
    Buildingthegrove.blogspot
    The Grove at Five Points



Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 17
    Last Post: Mar. 19, 2012, 10:05 PM
  2. how far would a horse's jump span be over a 4'9" jump
    By firewalker911 in forum Hunter/Jumper
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: Jun. 11, 2011, 09:15 AM
  3. Replies: 11
    Last Post: Jan. 25, 2010, 03:42 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •