The Chronicle of the Horse
MagazineNewsHorse SportsHorse CareCOTH StoreVoicesThe Chronicle UntackedDirectoriesMarketplaceDates & Results
 
Results 1 to 9 of 9
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar. 3, 2012
    Posts
    235

    Default How to market myself

    Over the past year I had the wonderful opportunity to work at a horse barn and work with six horses, meet amazing people, and gain so much experience. I have moved back home (I was in MN but now I am back in ME). This fall when i go back to school my dream job would be to work at another barn, riding isn't a must. I contacted a few barns in the area that I will be going to school and they turned me down because their barn worked in a co-op system, which is that the owners of the horses do their own chores so outside people do not need to be hired. Unfortunately most of the barns in the area work the same way.

    A coworker and I were discussing this and she said that I could market myself and talk to horse owners and offer to clean stalls and/or grain their horses for $10 a horse per day. Is this a practical idea? And if so how do I market myself and find people that may be interested in this service?
    http://www.horsez-r-us.blogspot.com
    Blog of an ordinary and every day horse lover!



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan. 30, 2005
    Posts
    224

    Default

    Do you mean on a part time "can't get to the barn" basis?

    Otherwise, $10 day turns into $300/month per horse, which is high for labor. Grooms at large show barns don't even make that.

    Also, since co-ops often involve boarders swapping out chores for one another (they'll each take a day or part of a day), it may be a hard sell. Boarder A might want to get out of Tuesday morning's feedings, but Boarders B, C, D & E might not be cool with you tending to their horses and may be unwilling to pay anyone to perform the trade off work that Boarder A is to provide for free as part of their arrangement.

    You could try marketing yourself as a farm sitter - I have a pet sitting business and will farm sit, but I also have an LLC to protect my assets, carry insurance to cover the animals in my care, and have experience as the head groom of a 40+ horse barn.

    It never hurts to try, though. Good luck.



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr. 19, 2011
    Location
    Madison, GA
    Posts
    2,770

    Default

    Where is your school? I was in your position during college and found a local dude ranch to work at. Are there any commerical trail riding barns, lesson barns, etc. in your area?
    Southern Cross Guest Ranch
    An All Inclusive Guest Ranch Vacation - Georgia
    www.southcross.com
    RIP Bocephus March 2008 - April 2013



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug. 17, 2004
    Location
    Rixeyville, VA
    Posts
    6,470

    Default

    Put an ad in the local horse mags under classified -- help available. Put flyers up in local feed/tack stores. Email flyers to barns. Go visit barns. Advertise on FB.

    Not every barn is a coop barn. You just need to look harder and market yourself more.
    Where Norwegian Fjords Rule
    http://www.ironwood-farm.com



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug. 20, 2006
    Location
    Pa-eternally laboring in the infinite creative and sustentative work of the universe
    Posts
    1,185

    Default

    You could also check with the farriers of the area, see if they need help holding. Even if you do this for near-free, it will put you in contact with folks you'd otherwise never find.

    Once you get started, there will be plenty of work. I did farm-care on a as-needed basis, first to just help a friend; then before you knew it ... I was full-time! one lady even split her morning paper route...
    you'd be surprised how this type of entrepreneurship can change your life, so buckle your seat-belt!

    Dependability, flexibility and a professional manner are imperative. (yes, as mentioned, LLC/ins. etc).
    IN GOD WE TRUST
    OTTB's ready to show/event/jumpers. Track ponies for perfect trail partners.
    http://www.horseville.com/php/search...=1&ssid=057680



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep. 5, 2011
    Posts
    2,966

    Default

    Just out of curiousity, who is responsible for liability insurance in this type of situation?

    Years ago when I was looking for barn help during a convalescent period, I was informed by both my accountant & my insurance carrier NOT to even consider hiring outside help (as in teenagers, college kids, etc., etc.) who didn't have their own liability insurance. Was told that any injury - via horse, stepping on a rake, stung by a bee - whatever - would fall on my shoulders & could end up ugly since I wasn't carrying Workmens' Comp.



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug. 17, 2004
    Location
    Rixeyville, VA
    Posts
    6,470

    Default

    Depends on how you are set-up. If the barn is at your home and is not a commercial enterprise, your homeowners would have coverage for independent contractors who may be injured or have their property damaged while at your barn.

    If it is a commercial venture, then your commercial general liability policy would cover it.

    I would be very careful about what duties were assigned so that the person really is an independent contractor and not just a way to avoid taxes and W/C for an employee. Worker comp insurance is not that expensive BTW. Believe me, in the event of a claim, one of the first things the insurance carrier is going to examine is whether the injured party was an employee or an IC. Just saying so isn't enough. You need to comply with the IRS definition.
    Where Norwegian Fjords Rule
    http://www.ironwood-farm.com



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar. 3, 2012
    Posts
    235

    Default

    Zakk: Great point! Maybe that fee is a little expensive. A farm sitting job would be great!

    Overo: I am going to school in Orono, I have done numerous searches for barns in the area but have only found a couple unfortunately, but I'm sure that doesn't mean there isn't any more in the area!

    Ironwood: Exactly! I have never had to market myself before so that is my game plan.

    Brightsky: Wow sounds like it was a blast for you! I am really hoping that the school will set up my classes in a way that I'm out before noon time, so I can have that flexibility aspect.
    http://www.horsez-r-us.blogspot.com
    Blog of an ordinary and every day horse lover!



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar. 26, 2008
    Location
    Maine
    Posts
    1,855

    Default

    I went to school up at Orono and I know of a couple barns in that area that are regularly looking for workers. You do need to travel a bit south to get to the bigger/more active barns (I drove 30 minutes to the barn where I boarded). Feel free to send me a PM if you'd like more info!
    "Last time I picked your feet, you broke my toe!"



Similar Threads

  1. Is there a market for?
    By adelmo95 in forum Dressage
    Replies: 42
    Last Post: Nov. 2, 2012, 12:06 PM
  2. Is there a market for this?
    By Tobias in forum Dressage
    Replies: 24
    Last Post: Jun. 24, 2012, 10:34 AM
  3. Is there a market for this?
    By Tobias in forum Hunter/Jumper
    Replies: 14
    Last Post: Jun. 21, 2012, 10:51 PM
  4. Market for a jumper pony? Or any market for that matter?
    By plumbrook in forum Hunter/Jumper
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: Aug. 9, 2011, 07:49 AM
  5. Is there a market for...
    By hunterhorse22 in forum Hunter/Jumper
    Replies: 23
    Last Post: Sep. 28, 2010, 06:57 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
randomness