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  1. #21
    Join Date
    Jan. 12, 2012
    Location
    Fort Worth, TX
    Posts
    7

    Default

    Wow, thanks everyone! I'm starting my list of new ideas

    This weekend I tried the blindfold thing AND the hot/humid weather. It worked okay...definitely not as great as I had expected. I was able to get his front two feet in the creek for about 3 seconds. He splashed around and flew backwards. There's definitely no tricking him into the water. He knew he was in/around it and did NOT like it!

    I don't really have access to water that I can lunge around. The two creeks/large mud holes on the barn property are located at the bottom of an incline. Maybe that's making it worse?

    I'm off to grab a tarp for this weekend! I also think I need to take a deep breath and build some patience...thanks for the motivation, yellow-horse!

    One last thing...I live in North Texas, where rain is becoming scarce (thus, bodies of water are drying up). Or else I'd love to ride in the rain more.



  2. #22
    Join Date
    Nov. 13, 2007
    Location
    NW Louisiana
    Posts
    5,185

    Default

    I've only ever used the blindfold method on shallower water that looks like a horse-eating death trap, so splashing wasn't an issue. Maybe try that again if you can find something shallow, preferably with a sandier base? I've not ridden the filly through water since that ride due to lameness issues, but by the end of the ride she was walking calmly through shallower puddles. I'm in NW LA, so we didn't have anything very deep last year to try.



  3. #23
    Join Date
    May. 18, 2006
    Location
    Richmond, VA
    Posts
    242

    Default

    Simbalism taught me how to get my pony across a creek. Get your Wellies on and a pocket (or more) full of peppermints. Bring your patience. Walk, leading your horse in everytime he/she gets closer or puts a foot in, give a treat. I spent the day walking all over the property, walking in and out of the creeks. After that, make sure you go through water at every chance and make it fun. Now the pony has figure out he likes to swim!



  4. #24
    Join Date
    Mar. 6, 2009
    Posts
    8,377

    Default Just Ride your Horse BACKWARDS through the water ~

    Just ride him BACKWARDS through the water .... like a puddle or stream to get him used to the water ~

    He can't be afraid of what he can not see = thus backing across is much easier than all that blindfolding and 'luring' with peppermints

    Please just try this = it works ...

    he is frightened as he can not tell depth ``` thinks he is falling in a hole ~
    Zu Zu Bailey " IT"S A WONDERFUL LIFE !"



  5. #25
    Join Date
    Oct. 12, 2001
    Location
    Center of the Universe
    Posts
    6,901

    Default

    horses can see behind themselves quite well, they have panoramic vision.



  6. #26
    Join Date
    Mar. 6, 2009
    Posts
    8,377

    Default NOT DIRECTLY BEHIND THEM ~ JUST KEEP HORSE FOCUSED AND TRY THIS METHOD ~

    WELL, YES ! but they can not see directly behiond them ~ SO if one keeps the horse even "SEMI-FOCUSED" ... this method will work ~

    I have used it many times ~

    GOOD LUCK !

    Quote Originally Posted by wendy View Post
    horses can see behind themselves quite well, they have panoramic vision.
    Zu Zu Bailey " IT"S A WONDERFUL LIFE !"



  7. #27
    Join Date
    Mar. 9, 2006
    Posts
    1,830

    Default

    A problem with the get-off-and-lead-him-thru method is that the horse may try to jump the water. I really prefer not to be within rein's length of a leaping horse. Too much chance of being struck or run over.



  8. #28
    Join Date
    Jan. 27, 2002
    Location
    Arlington, VA US
    Posts
    1,348

    Default

    whatever course of action you choose, ensure you have plenty of time and stay calm, not rushed. For those with former jumpers, please be aware that some barns put electric current through liverpool jumps (water jumps) to discourage the horses from touching the water. My friend rode a former jumper, imported from Europe, who had this issue. He would back into a stream, then once in and realizing he was not getting zapped, would plod calmly onward.
    Appy Trails,
    Kathy & Cadet
    member CDCTA www.cdcta.com, TROT www.trot-md.org & Free State Appaloosa Horse Club freestateaphc.org



  9. #29
    Join Date
    Dec. 31, 2003
    Location
    Central Ohio
    Posts
    653

    Default

    One trick that I've seen work with event horses who don't like water obstacles is this: Prior to schooling the water "jump" or obstacle, you take a bucket of water and splash it all over their legs, especially the front legs. Then go school. There are certain horses that object to getting their feet wet! I know it sounds strange, but at least try it. I've actually seen this work amazingly well for sensitive TBs who - once their feet are already wet - Oh WELL, lets go in the water now, no problem!
    !



  10. #30
    Join Date
    Sep. 30, 2007
    Posts
    2,689

    Default

    If all else fails, build a moat around his feeder. Eventually he will have to cross the water to get to his food. Food is the great motivator!!!!!!!



  11. #31
    Join Date
    Sep. 26, 2010
    Posts
    3,967

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by meupatdoes View Post
    A very slick dressage trainer I know taught a horse to enter the water by walking along the bank, and gradually legyielding in.
    LMAO. That's awesome!



  12. #32
    Join Date
    May. 5, 2011
    Posts
    1,715

    Default

    As far as the longing idea goes, you don't actually have to longe. You can just back away from the offending water source, work *really hard* for a few minutes and try again. I've used just a section of trail to do collected trot or canter work or whatever then go back to the water crossing.



  13. #33
    Join Date
    Apr. 1, 2008
    Posts
    4,536

    Default

    I'd just wait him out, which is what John Lyons basically did with this horse and a tarp.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aG6dAQaSSn4



  14. #34
    Join Date
    Jan. 12, 2012
    Location
    Fort Worth, TX
    Posts
    7

    Default

    Update!

    He is now crossing this stream! And only this stream. We haven't been able to conquer any other water sources on the property, like muddy puddles and boggy areas, but I'm going to take what I can get for now.

    The solution: the blindfold method! It worked surprisingly well and very quickly. When I took it off in the middle of the stream he pranced around a little bit, relieved himself, and then played with it for a little bit.

    I've ridden him through it twice now; while it's certainly not his favorite thing to do, he's learned that it won't kill him. I just hope this new skill will translate to a strange water source on a new trail when we do our first ride.

    Thanks for all the help!!



  15. #35
    Join Date
    Jun. 11, 2012
    Posts
    38

    Default

    Congratulations on getting him to cross the water. Groundwork will help you gain your horse's trust and confidence around all sorts of scary objects, including streams other than this one. There are several good natural horsemanship videos, Clinton Anderson, Pat Parelli, etc. that walk you through the psychology and exercises to teach your horse to cross tarps, bridges, teeter-totter obstacles, uneven footing, etc. It's a little like learning a foreign language, but really fun, and in a way life-changing, because your relationship with your horse improves so dramatically.



  16. #36
    Join Date
    Jan. 7, 2009
    Location
    New Zealand
    Posts
    205

    Default

    Why should he walk through puddles in his paddock?
    Arabs are notorious for being careful about where they put their feet - well mine are - they never walk through puddles in their paddock. They will go through water, but need time to investigate and make up their minds that it is safe, and if on the trail will always walk around the edge, or as near as they can. Streams they will jump, otherwise they need to be able to see the bottom, which in our river has a large stony bottom, so it needs careful foot placement on the 20 metre crossing.

    And crossing the tarp didn't help get one footfall when it came to water crossings. Great for walking on other tarps though!



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