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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov. 13, 2007
    Location
    NW Louisiana
    Posts
    5,241

    Default standardbred mare lame ONLY at trot?

    my friend has a standardbred mare, 6 years old I think, that only trots in the pasture. he's been riding her just fine at a 4-beat gait and a pace, and has never noticed any issues at all. I've never noticed anything while he's riding her either.

    well, we saw her trot in the pasture the other day, and she is LAME. head-bobbing at the trot. she picked up a canter, totally sound. sound at a gallop. sound at a walk.

    I'm 99% sure it's not an abscess. She was a little lame at a trot in the pasture about a month ago, but after a minute of her trotting around, she seemed fine. he gave her some time off, and she was never lame at all under saddle at a gait. this time it's the same hoof.

    She was sound at a gait (and walk and canter) 3 or 4 days ago, but again, he never rides her at a trot.

    any ideas? obviously she's not being ridden right now. we have NO decent vets here, so for any diagnostics she would have to go 3 hours away to LSU.

    what's odd is that of her 5 gaits, she's only lame at one of them. I don't know much about gaited horses, but that doesn't seem right.



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr. 8, 2012
    Location
    North Texas
    Posts
    588

    Default

    Maybe i'm the only one, but that makes me think its her back. Since gaits are all different, the lateral movement from the trot could be knockin something in her spine? In that case, a chiropractor and saddle fit check would probably be a good call. But that is but a guess, nothing more.
    Clancy 17hh chestnut Dutch WB, '99. Owned and loved since '04 and still goin'!



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov. 16, 2004
    Location
    NE Indiana
    Posts
    5,530

    Default

    Could be shoulder. I have a Haflinger who does this exact same thing and he has nerve damage and some arthritis in his shoulder.

    The vet will know though .



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar. 28, 2002
    Location
    East of Dog River
    Posts
    5,791

    Default

    Front end or hind? It can be hard telling sometimes . If it were me, I would probably start at the back end first beginning with hocks, particularly if this mare raced. Unfortunatley, it could be damned near anything, so she really does need a good going over.
    Founder of the Dyslexic Clique. Dyslexics of the world - UNTIE!!

    Member: Incredible Invisbles



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov. 9, 2005
    Location
    uk
    Posts
    15,278

    Default

    tell you mate not to ride her until the lameness issue is sorted
    and if you don't know then call a vet as it could be a number of things and here we can only guess and guessing isn't going to help the mare
    so rest her up and call the vet



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec. 13, 1999
    Location
    Greensboro, NC
    Posts
    35,941

    Default

    Well, if she's lame at a trot, she's lame. The canter and walk are *terrible* gaits by which to see/judge lameness.

    the trot is the best gait to see lameness for a reason - the bi-lateral symmetry.

    Even the pace is more difficult, because if a front leg is sore, the hind on the same side is there to take up the slack for that side. But the trot has 1 leg on each side to take the weight, so it's easier to see issues.
    ______________________________
    The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances. - ET



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov. 16, 2004
    Location
    NE Indiana
    Posts
    5,530

    Default

    LOL...I tried to hit "like" on JB's post above!



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Apr. 29, 2006
    Location
    Evansville, Wisconsin
    Posts
    3,081

    Default

    When my younger mare was lame from a subchondral cystic lesion in her stifle she seemed fine at the walk, and then I knew something was really wrong when I asked her to trot and she started to perform some sort of mystery gait. And it really did feel like gaiting to me. But I've owned her since she was born, I own her mother, and neither of them are gaited, and neither of them had ever done anything like that before. That was just her way to compensate for her lameness.

    I agree with PP who have recommended a visit with a good vet is in order. As JB said, lame at the trot is lame.
    "In order to really enjoy a dog, one doesn’t merely train him to be semi-human. The point of it is to open oneself to the possibility of becoming part dog."
    -Edward Hoagland



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb. 10, 2006
    Location
    Middle of Nowhere, take a right, FL
    Posts
    4,443

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by goeslikestink View Post
    tell you mate not to ride her until the lameness issue is sorted
    and if you don't know then call a vet as it could be a number of things and here we can only guess and guessing isn't going to help the mare
    so rest her up and call the vet
    Yeah this...
    Every mighty oak was once a nut that stood its ground.

    Proud Closet Canterer! Member Riders with Fibromyalgia clique.



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jul. 6, 2005
    Posts
    256

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by JB View Post
    Well, if she's lame at a trot, she's lame. The canter and walk are *terrible* gaits by which to see/judge lameness.

    the trot is the best gait to see lameness for a reason - the bi-lateral symmetry.

    Even the pace is more difficult, because if a front leg is sore, the hind on the same side is there to take up the slack for that side. But the trot has 1 leg on each side to take the weight, so it's easier to see issues.
    Exactly! She's not lame at one gait, she's lame!

    OP, it would be very difficult to even guess what it could be without seeing her, unfortunately.



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Aug. 25, 2005
    Location
    Northeast
    Posts
    10,789

    Exclamation !!!

    Lameness, unless 3 legged is difficult to evaluate except at the trot.

    A lame horse, should not be ridden or exercised until the cause is diagnosed. If, as it appears here, the cause is not obvious, you need a veterinarian. ASAP


    gls where've you been? Missed you!
    Some riders change their horse, they change their saddle, they change their teacher; they never change themselves.



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