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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec. 29, 1999
    Location
    Harrisburg, PA USA
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    5,618

    Default "Riding for Ladies" - 1891

    http://www.gutenberg.org/files/39610...-h/39610-h.htm

    Complete with fetching illustrations of appropriate riding habits.

    More good stuff from Project Gutenberg. Thank God for Michael Hart, may he rest in peace.



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec. 29, 1999
    Location
    Harrisburg, PA USA
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    5,618

    Default

    This one has chapters on hunting: http://www.gutenberg.org/files/39501...-h/39501-h.htm

    This book is by the

    "AUTHORESS OF "THE KNAVE OF CLUBS,"
    "HORSES AND HORSEMEN," "GRANDFATHER'S HUNTER,"
    "ONE IN TEN THOUSAND," "SPRING LEAVES,"
    "THOUGHTS ON THE TALMUD," ETC., ETC."

    Thoughts on The Talmud? What, was he a racehorse?



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug. 6, 2002
    Location
    NJ, USA
    Posts
    2,190

    Default

    Exquisite! I love old riding manuals, and these are chock full of entertaining anecdotes. I think I know what I'm doing on my work breaks today.

    Thanks for posting this gem!



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul. 27, 2011
    Posts
    629

    Default

    If you search through some of the stuff they have on the Project Gutenberg site, they also have a copy of Xenophon's "On Horsemanship", among other really good works.



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul. 19, 2007
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    10,269

    Default

    I enjoy her definition of a beginner's 'low and easy' jump--a three-foot gorse hedge!



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan. 28, 2000
    Location
    Columbia, Maryland
    Posts
    7,008

    Default

    Listen to a man - you can't go wrong.
    "No matter how well you perform there's always somebody of intelligent opinion who thinks it's lousy." - Laurence Olivier



  7. #7

    Default

    I think she was upset about the tacky tack:

    "On the day of which I write, however, ladies on horseback were by no means uncommon: I should say there were at least two hundred present upon the lawn. Some rode so well, and were so beautifully turned out, that the most hypercritical could find no fault; but of the majority—what can I say? Alas! nothing that would sound at all favourable. Such horses, such saddles, such rusty bridles, such riding-habits, such hats, whips, and gloves; and, above all, such coiffures! My very soul was sorry. I could not laugh, as some others were doing. I felt too melancholy for mirth. It seemed to me most grievous that my own sex (many of them so young and beautiful) should be thus held up to ridicule."

    Rusty bridles, oh my! Apparently their hairdos were the real issue, though.

    And for the people who hate the tacky tack bling, you are not alone:

    "... in my opinion there cannot be too much simplicity about everything connected with riding appointments. A plainness, amounting even to severity, is to be preferred before any outward show. Ribbons, and coloured veils, and yellow gloves, and showy flowers are alike objectionable. A gaudy "get up" (to make use of an expressive common-place) is highly to be condemned, and at once stamps the wearer as a person of inferior taste. Therefore avoid it. Let your saddle be, like your personal attire, remarkable only for its perfect freedom from ornament or display."



  8. #8

    Default

    I love this book, because this lady clearly would have been right at home on COTH:

    "I was once asked to take a young lady with me for a ride in the park, to witness a field-day, or polo match, or something or another of especial interest which happened to be going forward. I would generally prefer being asked to face a battery of Zulus rather than act as chaperone to young lady équestriennes, who are usually ignorant of riding, and insufferably badly turned out. However, upon this occasion I could not refuse. The lady's parents were kind, amiable country folks, who had invested a portion of their wealth in sending their daughter up to town to get lessons from a fashionable riding-master, and to ride out with whomsoever might be induced to take her.

    Well, the young lady's horse was the first arrival: a hired hack—usual style; bones protruding—knees well over—rusty bridle—greasy reins—dirty girths—and dilapidated saddle, indifferently polished up for the occasion.

    The young lady herself came next, stepping daintily out of a cab, as though she were quite mistress of the situation. Ye gods! What a get up! I was positively electrified. Her habit—certainly well made—was of bright blue cloth, with worked frills at the throat and wrists. She wore a brilliant knot of scarlet ribbon at her neck, and a huge bouquet in her button-hole. Her hat was a silk one, set right on the back of her head, with a velvet rosettte and steel buckle in front, and a long veil of grey gauze streaming out behind. When we add orange gloves, and a riding-whip with a gaudy tassel appended to it, you have the details of a costume at once singular and unique.

    I did not at first know whether to get a sudden attack of the measles or the toothache, and send her out with my groom to escort her, but discarding the thought as ill-natured, I compromised matters by bringing her to my own room, and effecting alterations in her toilet which soon gave her a more civilised appearance. I set the hat straight upon her head, and bound it securely in its place, removed from it the gauze and buckle, and tied on one of my own plain black veils of simple spotted net. I could not do away with the frillings, for they were stitched on as though they were never meant to come off; but the red bow I replaced with a silver arrow, threw away the flowers, removed the whip-tassel, and substituted a pair of my own gloves for the cherished orange kid. Then we set out."

    I think she must have been Fugly's grandmother!



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jul. 20, 2010
    Location
    Texarkana, AR
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    1,521

    Default

    Personally, I think she was War Dances great, great grandmother. She was very much against children taking riding lessons, her preferred age for young ladies learning to ride was 16. She also advised against paid instructors as "Jem" the groom and "John" the coachman were not likely to be properly critical of your riding style because they were your social inferiors.



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jul. 5, 2007
    Location
    Beside Myself ~ Western NY
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    6,167

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    Quote Originally Posted by wireweiners View Post
    Personally, I think she was War Dances great, great grandmother. She was very much against children taking riding lessons, her preferred age for young ladies learning to ride was 16. She also advised against paid instructors as "Jem" the groom and "John" the coachman were not likely to be properly critical of your riding style because they were your social inferiors.



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Feb. 23, 1999
    Location
    Cypress, near Houston, Texas
    Posts
    8,418

    Default

    Ye, Gads! It's Aunt Ester!
    Visit Sonesta Farms website at www.sonestafarms.com or our FaceBook page at www.facebook.com/sonestafarms. Also showing & breeding Cavalier King Charles Spaniels.



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Oct. 9, 2008
    Posts
    657

    Default

    I think that one's my favorite manual of all the ones I read while writing my senior thesis this semester.
    She definitely had big issue with women not being fashionable enough on horseback.



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