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  1. #21
    Join Date
    Jun. 28, 2003
    Posts
    4,443

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    Personally, we are all for outside doors on stalls. Also for separate paddock NOT connected to barn to put horses in once evacuated.

    By the way... if you've ever done fire extinguisher training you'll know they don't last long. They are to help you get out if needed, NOT necessarily to put out the fire. Most run for less than a minute total.

    We lost three horses (one of ours) in our fire who would not leave. Almost lost the BOs SO when he went in to save Ned who head in a corner. We have said we aren't sure what we would have done if he'd been seriously injured trying to get Ned out so PLEASE think about your own safety you really don't have much time in a fire.

    An outside door probably would have helped with Alex - he was second door from interior exit and I don't think they could get to him from inside. Fortunately for us he decided to jump out his large stall window when something on fire landed on his back.

    2 years of almost daily work and we have him back as a driving horse, but it could easily have gone another way.

    At the very least talk to everyone involved in your barn about what you would do in a fire. Think about the trick locks on your Houdini horse doors etc



  2. #22
    Join Date
    Nov. 16, 2004
    Location
    NE Indiana
    Posts
    5,530

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    Quote Originally Posted by BaroquePony View Post
    You can tie a rope around the neck of a horse, or have a nice slip-over-the-head loop that has already been spliced, then take your long end and slide it through the loop that is around the neck, pull out a large loop and slide that over the horse's nose and snug it up using the long end that should still be hanging down, and you have a halter and lead rope all-in-one.

    That is one way.

    I've had horses here that wwould literally freeze when trying to lead them like this. Now I teach all of my horses to lead this way, as well as by a hand under the jaw - not because I want to lead them around by the jaw or with a slip knot, but because in an emergency they have to accept whatever I've got to do to get them to safety.



  3. #23
    Join Date
    Jul. 13, 2011
    Location
    East Longmeadow, MA
    Posts
    3,831

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    The barn where I board did have outside doors at one time. They are all permanently shut now, I can't think why. The barn my horse is in is made of concrete but the hay is stored in the loft right above the horses, and the beams up there are wood.

    I am going to ask the BO about this. I can't imagine much that is more scary to me than a barn fire.
    What's wrong with you?? Your cheese done slid off its cracker?!?!



  4. #24
    Join Date
    Dec. 13, 1999
    Location
    Greensboro, NC
    Posts
    36,314

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    Quote Originally Posted by hundredacres View Post
    I've had horses here that wwould literally freeze when trying to lead them like this. Now I teach all of my horses to lead this way, as well as by a hand under the jaw - not because I want to lead them around by the jaw or with a slip knot, but because in an emergency they have to accept whatever I've got to do to get them to safety.
    Good point! All mine will lead in pretty ideal situations with a hand under the jaw, all will lead in all but the worst situations with a rope around the neck. Even my yearling. To me it's just second nature to do these things, but I can see where it might not even be thought of in very structured barn environments.

    Also, please teach your horse how to lead from the right side! You'd be surprised how many adult horses I've seen freeze also when lead from that side.
    ______________________________
    The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances. - ET



  5. #25
    Join Date
    Jul. 6, 2005
    Posts
    256

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    I agree with everything said here, but I did assume the point of the outside stall doors was to have an additional access point to get to the horses and lead them out. The hard part being it is yet another way for them to run back in.



  6. #26
    Join Date
    Dec. 13, 1999
    Location
    Greensboro, NC
    Posts
    36,314

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    Heck, I can lead all 4 of mine at once if I need to. I routinely led 3 at once before my mare foaled. It's just good manners to be able to do that
    ______________________________
    The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances. - ET



  7. #27
    Join Date
    Apr. 17, 2006
    Posts
    375

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    Nothing you can do if your existing barn is made out of wood...sad, tragedy. Going forward, barns can be made of materials that do not burn. Store hay and shavings in a separate barn. A strict no smoking policy is a must.

    Sorry for the loss.



  8. #28
    Join Date
    Jan. 13, 2003
    Posts
    6,849

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    Did the news report indicate if the barn had lightening rods?
    Summit Sporthorses Ltd. Inc.
    "Breeding Competition Partners & Lifelong Friends"



  9. #29
    Join Date
    Apr. 29, 2006
    Location
    Evansville, Wisconsin
    Posts
    3,081

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    Quote Originally Posted by Plumcreek View Post
    Many reasons: Much of the country has cold winters with barns built for closed in warmth. Old wooden farm barns turned into horse barns with questionable wiring not redone.
    I'm not sure if that's the case in this particular instance, but here in WI it's dairy cow country, and a lot of horse barns are old dairy barns that have been renovated. Which often means they're made almost entirely out of wood, with low ceilings, old wiring everywhere, and haylofts above. And people around here seem to put up hay over their stalls a LOT despite the fire hazard because it keeps the barn so much warmer. And many of the things that people do around here to try to keep things warm are fire hazards. Even if you don't want to keep things toasty, you still have to keep the water/pipes from freezing somehow.

    Bank barns are also quite common around here, which can be extra scary, since I see a lot of people store hay and shavings in them, and then they drive their tractor in and park it with its hot engine right next to all those flammables. Scary.

    Personally, my horses live out. They have run-in access 24/7 but they don't particularly like going in the barn, so I really doubt they'd suddenly decide to run inside it if it went up in flames.
    "In order to really enjoy a dog, one doesn’t merely train him to be semi-human. The point of it is to open oneself to the possibility of becoming part dog."
    -Edward Hoagland



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