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  1. #81
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    Apr. 26, 2000
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    http://www.parellinaturalhorsetraini...orse-cribbing/

    It's okay...they're just burping.




  2. #82
    Join Date
    Oct. 14, 2007
    Location
    California
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    3,895

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    Quote Originally Posted by Finzean View Post
    Oh My!!! burping LOL

    This entire thread is the most interesting yet annoying thread I think I have ever read...

    In the 35 + years I have been involved in the horse world; hunters, jumpers, dressage, eventing, trail riding, barrels, reining, racing, endurance, cutting friends I know I have not once heard cribbing was burping, that it wasn't learned from another horse, or that it didn't cause health issues. Now for sure each horse is individual so this is reason for some pick it up, some don't, some have health issues, some don't etc.

    I can entertain one of the reasons for cribbing to be genetic but I'll be danged if it isn't something that "CAN" be taught to another horse.. and not because they are "all" under the same stress - bologna. Boredom, sure....

    Formal studies and official statistics can be helpful but being around horses and horse people your entire life is a pretty good indicator of many horse related topics. And this is one of them.

    Sorry but my vote is on the birds of a feather flock together concept.

    And to answer the OPs question. Why is it bad - it's annoying, it can be destructive to property and I believe it can cause scar tissue and colic.
    Last edited by doublesstable; Jan. 13, 2013 at 12:30 AM.
    Don't saw on your horses mouth it's not a piece of wood! ~ GM



  3. #83
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    Oct. 14, 2007
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    California
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    On horse habits example... one of my horses came to me with a habit of shaking his head and making his lips flap around.... about four years later my other horse that I have had since born learned how to flap his lips just like the other horse.

    One cribbing example - friend had horse that cribbed; filly came in barn never cribbed. Near cribbing horse for one week began cribbing. Other horses on same diet, same stall did not crib. Some just have a more addictive personality.

    I have seen these type of things over and over; like even pawing... biting... whatever.. Birds of a feather...
    Don't saw on your horses mouth it's not a piece of wood! ~ GM



  4. #84
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    Apr. 26, 2000
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    doublesstable - my first pony mare did this thing where she would fling her head around like some sort of wild stallion in the movies. We bought a 2 mo QH filly from a neglect situation and turner her out w/the pony mare. The QH grew up doing it. Her '96 foal was reared by the QH mare & the pony mare...she still does it to this day, although infrequently now that her mentors have gone on to pony heaven.

    Yeah, they teach stuff to one another and under certain circumstances, the cribbing ain't that different. Parelli might also want to check with the leading vet schools about the burping nonsense...ugh.



  5. #85
    Join Date
    Aug. 3, 2004
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    Vermont
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    I had my old gelding put down last year at age 30....he cribbed his entire life (I had him for 26 years). I raised two foals in the same barn as him. One mare is 9 this year...she'll chew on fence posts in boredom when the snow is covering the ground but never cribs. However...my coming 4 year old gelding started cribbing out of the blue two whole months AFTER my old gelding was put down. He lives outside 24/7. Just picked it up....let me tell you how much that pisses me off!



  6. #86
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    Sep. 15, 2008
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    Michigan
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    I had to post a reply to this, because I think I had one of the worst cribbers in the world. I usually don't mind a cribber, but she was bad.

    I tried to keep a muzzle and a collar on her. She would go out to the tree in the pasture and figured a way to crib through both the muzzle and collar all day long. I ended up taking the muzzle off because she knew how to crib on that. She was starving herself. No amount of hay, no matter how good it was, would stop her for a second. She lost a ton of weight. I treated her for ulcers with ulcerguard, which did not help and was very expensive. She broke her jaw from cribbing so hard and bad. She wouldn't eat her grain because she would rather crib.

    One thing I didn't have anymore was grass pastures, and this mare thrived on grass pastures. So I sent her to a home in Kentucky, where she still cribbed, but not as much because she had all the grass.



  7. #87
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    Feb. 1, 2012
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    Quote Originally Posted by vtdobes View Post
    However...my coming 4 year old gelding started cribbing out of the blue two whole months AFTER my old gelding was put down. He lives outside 24/7. Just picked it up....let me tell you how much that pisses me off!
    Is it possible that your youngster is stressed out over the loss of his herd companion and the starting to crib is a result of ulcery issues going on?

    There is a correlation between horses with gastric ulcers & cribbing.
    "If you think nobody cares about you, try missing a couple payments..."


    1 members found this post helpful.

  8. #88
    Join Date
    Jan. 20, 2013
    Posts
    1

    Default Dare Cribbing Collar

    Hello
    I live in the UK and have heard of the Dare Cribbing Collar and really think it would be the answer for my horse.

    I currently have a miracle collar which work great but rubs across his brow.

    Does anyone know how I can get one in the UK or have one they could send me.



  9. #89
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    Sep. 14, 2000
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    Goochland, VA
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    Quote Originally Posted by Simkie View Post
    I believe there have been MULTIPLE studies that have proven this one false.

    Cribbing does seem to have a high genetic component, though. If the sire or dam cribs, the foal is more likely to crib, even if it NEVER sees another horse cribbing.
    This. I have never had one colic, and I have never had one learn it from another. My current cribber's dam cribbed, and since I got him at 6 months, he always wanted to grab stuff and pull. It was several years before he actually cribbed, but we knew it was coming. The only thing that bothers me is how hard he is on the fences. Miracle collar works on him.
    Laurie
    Finding, preparing, showing and training young hunters, in hand and performance.
    www.juniorjohnsontrainingandsales.com



  10. #90
    Join Date
    Aug. 7, 2011
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    Doesn't cribbing add to jaw and tension-in-back problems?

    And BTW, burping is exhaling air from the gut, cribbing is sucking air into the gut.



  11. #91
    Join Date
    Apr. 9, 2007
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    Zone IV/Area III
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    We have a cribber at my barn for the first time in many years, and he seems pretty pacified by his small hole hay net. Since we gave it to him, he has reduced his cribbing a pretty good amount. I wouldn't say he is a "severe" cribber, but he has pulled off a few boards in his pasture ;D

    Burping and cribbing is just silly...I actually chuckled when I saw that link.



  12. #92
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    Jun. 30, 2006
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    Middle Tennessee
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    Quote Originally Posted by vtdobes View Post
    However...my coming 4 year old gelding started cribbing out of the blue two whole months AFTER my old gelding was put down. He lives outside 24/7. Just picked it up....let me tell you how much that pisses me off!
    You're not alone! My mare started cribbing out of the blue around her 3rd birthday. Lived out 24/7 with all the hay and grass she could eat, a low-starch ration balancer, a good herd of friends, etc. etc. Scoped her and she had one of the best stomachs I have ever seen-- pretty much nothing going on.

    I was pissed too, LOL. But some horses are just gonna crib.
    Don't fall for a girl who fell for a horse just to be number two in her world... ~EFO



  13. #93
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    Aug. 4, 2009
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    MD
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    It's like any other OCD it's only as bad as you let it dominate. Crib straps and electric fence are effective deterants. They also use ghastly rings on the teeth which borders on barbaric.



  14. #94
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    Mar. 27, 2008
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    Maryland
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    We have one cribber among 60 horses. This horse must be close to 20 and has cribbed since he was one and had to be on lengthy stall rest. None of the other horses have ever picked up his habit. I think they think he's stupid. He will cross the field alone to stand at the trough and crib while the others are eating. Compared to the others, he looks unthrifty, dull coat, ribby looking even though he's borderline fat. His teeth are ground down in front. He will crib a good portion of the day - it looks almost painful the way he swallows and huffs. The owners won't put a collar on him. We have electric fence so he uses the edge of the water trough.
    Burping. /facepalm
    You are what you dare.



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