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  1. #41
    Join Date
    Apr. 12, 2006
    Location
    Seville, FL
    Posts
    707

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    I don't have a problem with breeding a quality mare every year, but I have a problem with breeding a poor quality mare ever.

    I think some people see the problems of unwanted horses, abused and starving horses, liquidations of low-end breeding programs, and the cases of rescues having to go in and clean up after low-end breeders go belly up, and they start thinking ALL breeding should stop or be limited, but they sometimes fail to make the distinction between breeders producing quality horses versus the people breeding just to breed.

    I've seen mares who probably should be given 25 years between foals..... But I've also seen (and owned) mares who were worthy of being bred every year.

    Or maybe it's a case of anthropomorphism? *I* wouldn't want to have a baby every year. Luckily I'm not a broodmare.
    River Oaks Farm - home of the Elite Book Friesian Sporthorse Grand Prix dressage stallion Lexington - sire of four consecutive FSA National Inspection Champions. Endorsing the FSA.



  2. #42
    Join Date
    Feb. 1, 2003
    Location
    VT
    Posts
    637

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    My broodmares and riding horses are treasured members of my family, however, my philosophy is this:

    My horses live far better lives than many people on this earth. They have plenty of good food, warm clothes, shelter, no expense is spared on their medical bills, they are treated fairly, and they are told they are loved daily. I work my butt off to give them a wonderful life and in return, they have jobs too.

    I breed my mares every year unless there is a specific reason to give them a year off (their body is not in condition for whatever reason and they need time to recuperate). I have one broodmare who is on her 10th pregnancy in a row. I keep looking for any sign that she needs a break but so far she hasn't given me one. I figure, when she stops getting pregnant on the first try, then she can have a break ;-)

    I have one career broodmare who I retired a couple years ago due to pregnancy being so hard on her body. She is miserable - lost and purposeless. She has fallen from the alpha mare to the omega. I gave her a weaned foal this fall to watch over and told her she had a very important job in caring for him. The change in her was dramatic!! She instantly adopted him as her own and was lively, animated and in charge again.

    I think it is possible to manage your broodmares with a healthy balance between the need to run a productive business and compassion for them as living, breathing creatures.



  3. #43
    Join Date
    Oct. 29, 2008
    Posts
    1,645

    Default

    Eliza - well said.



  4. #44
    Join Date
    Oct. 2, 2007
    Location
    Mirabel, QC
    Posts
    2,656

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ticofuzzy View Post
    My broodmares and riding horses are treasured members of my family, however, my philosophy is this:

    My horses live far better lives than many people on this earth. They have plenty of good food, warm clothes, shelter, no expense is spared on their medical bills, they are treated fairly, and they are told they are loved daily. I work my butt off to give them a wonderful life and in return, they have jobs too.

    I breed my mares every year unless there is a specific reason to give them a year off (their body is not in condition for whatever reason and they need time to recuperate). I have one broodmare who is on her 10th pregnancy in a row. I keep looking for any sign that she needs a break but so far she hasn't given me one. I figure, when she stops getting pregnant on the first try, then she can have a break ;-)

    I have one career broodmare who I retired a couple years ago due to pregnancy being so hard on her body. She is miserable - lost and purposeless. She has fallen from the alpha mare to the omega. I gave her a weaned foal this fall to watch over and told her she had a very important job in caring for him. The change in her was dramatic!! She instantly adopted him as her own and was lively, animated and in charge again.

    I think it is possible to manage your broodmares with a healthy balance between the need to run a productive business and compassion for them as living, breathing creatures.
    Where's the clapping icon? Very well said.
    www.EquusMagnificus.ca
    Breeding & Sales - Currently: Eventing & Derby prospects
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