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  1. #1
    Join Date
    May. 17, 2010
    Posts
    47

    Question Standardbred

    I grew up trail riding Standardbred broodmares retired from the track. Now that I might be horse shopping for my second horse, it's like my brain is chanting "Standardbred, Standardberd" every time I turn around. Does anyone have experience with Standardbreds in dressage? & re-training them off the track?



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug. 28, 2007
    Location
    Triangle Area, NC
    Posts
    6,675

    Default

    Love Standardbreds, but cantering is a real struggle for them. If your heart is dead set on a stbd, then just find one that DOES canter, and go have fun.
    www.destinationconsensusequus.com
    chaque pas est fait ensemble



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar. 23, 2005
    Location
    the evergreen state!
    Posts
    1,253

    Default YES!

    YES!

    I have a 4 yr old standie who is coming home from 90 days of training on Monday I purchased him sight unseen off the internet when I was pining for a project horse. Not exactly the best way to go, and I probably got lucky.

    The gals who started him under saddle rode him once in a small pen, and then his second ride rode him out on the trails from there on out.

    He's a bred pacer, but walks, trots, and canters. He had a bit of trouble learning how to do trot poles, but now he's awesome at it. Canter was not hard for him at all.

    He's a total sweet heart - great work ethic, nice size (16.1), no dangerous behaviors, gets along great with all horses, and really safe around people. The perfect ammy horse in that regard. His biggest flaw I'd say is that his trot is really big and bouncy, which is why I put him in training. That's just him - trainer has a few warmbloods just like him in the barn.

    He also seems to have a "standardbred pacing" brain, and a "dressage/riding horse brain" - in that if you get him together, keep him together and relaxed- you have a beautiful picture. But if he gets nervous or doesn't understand, or falls apart- the pacing comes out. All it takes is bringing him back to walk, regrouping, and getting back to business.

    Later this year or early next year we'll start going over things, too - hehe, or at the very least I will



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul. 25, 2005
    Location
    Ontario
    Posts
    755

    Default

    Back in the days of my youth I rode a fair number of standardbreds and did dressage with them. A few had nice canters. Some of the most talented for dressage horses I have ever ridden have been standardbred crosses (believe it or not this is a standardbred X irish tb

    http://s221.photobucket.com/albums/d...ven-pose-1.jpg

    I also had her full sister

    http://i221.photobucket.com/albums/d...s/Champion.jpg

    If you can find one with a decent canter I would think a standardbred would make an excellent low level dressage horse. They tend to be very sensible, sound and athletic.



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov. 16, 2004
    Location
    NE Indiana
    Posts
    5,525

    Default

    Here's a great blog I like to read about a woman who is doing her best to promote the very versatile breed:

    http://standardbredexcellence.blogspot.com/

    I have STB and I'd get another if I needed another horse. My mare does canter but she can trot like a freight train.

    Oh, I always love to share this picture of Jo Pa's Tycoon doing dressage that surprises people:

    http://www.standardbredfanclub.com/dressage.html



  6. #6
    Join Date
    May. 17, 2010
    Posts
    47

    Default

    Thanks for all your posts & links.

    This is bringing back so many memories!
    Around 10 years old, trying to get Coinnara (my favorite Standardbred) to canter while riding bareback in grandpa's cow pasture... Oh my! If anyone could sit that high speed trot I'd like to see it! Freight train is right! Her sister, Cointra, on the other hand, would canter no problem, and jump beautifully too. My granddad bred them back in Sweden so I have been around a few and I just really like the breed.
    They were stricktly trotters though, not pacers (no pacing competitions in Sweden as far as I know). Should I be avoiding pacers? Or is it not to hard to "break them" of pacing?

    Now I just have to find someone that has a young, non-spooky, tall STB gelding (that canters) for sale in the Pacific Northwest...oh- and ofcourse affordable too. Piece of cake...

    So, you who have STBs, were they off the track, or how did you come by them? In fact- MyHorseFaith- I'd like to have YOURS! Sounds lovely :-D

    Thanks.



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul. 25, 2005
    Location
    Ontario
    Posts
    755

    Default

    The ones I rode were typically given away. But we are going back to the late 80s early 90s.

    I think I have seen ads around here for 'free to good homes' and our market it a bit better than the US. So you shouldn't have too much trouble.



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec. 29, 2007
    Posts
    913

    Default

    If I had a farm (or when my current horse is no longer), I'd adopt a Standardbred from

    http://www.osas.ca/

    Like this cool looking guy
    http://www.osas.ca/adoptions.asp?Key=1771
    "Those who know the least often know it the loudest."



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Nov. 16, 2004
    Location
    NE Indiana
    Posts
    5,525

    Default

    Mine is OT and OA (once Amish)....

    She's in my profile pic.

    I have very few pictures of me riding her but here's one:
    https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?f...type=3&theater



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Mar. 23, 2005
    Location
    the evergreen state!
    Posts
    1,253

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Daisydoo View Post

    So, you who have STBs, were they off the track, or how did you come by them? In fact- MyHorseFaith- I'd like to have YOURS! Sounds lovely :-D
    May I tempt you even further...



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Sep. 14, 2005
    Location
    central NJ
    Posts
    605

    Default

    They do make great riding horses. In ten years of working with them I have met very few who could not pick up the canter within a few rides under saddle, though like any young/green horse, they need time to build up the right muscles. Most of them will never be "10" movers, that's true, but they can generally manage the lower levels of dressage without a problem.

    Your best bet is to go shopping for one and evaluate for conformation and soundness just as you would any other horse, then work with someone who understands biomechanics and that the canter is a gait, not a speed. Do make sure that tack fits very well, because a little bit of discomfort will usually result in lateral gaiting, especially for the pacers. But don't be discouraged from looking at pacers -- a horse that is extremely hardwired to rack/pace is generally the exception, not the rule, and most learn to w/t/c just fine.

    Don't shy away from an otherwise suitable horse just because they have a race record, either. My old guy raced 222 times and still retired sound enough to humor me through a few years of LL eventing and hunter paces -- I've only retired him from jumping competition because he's got the start of a cataract in one eye. He takes a little maintenance (Adequan/joint supps), but nothing the average show horse doesn't already get as a matter of course.

    I adopted both of my horses from a rescue, but I'm on the wrong coast, unfortunately. A friend of mine in the PNW got her mare through Greener Pastures, which I think is based in BC, but I don't know much else in that area.

    Good luck!
    Member of the Standardbreds with Saddles Clique!
    They're not just for racing!
    nowthatsatrot.blogspot.com



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jan. 21, 2011
    Posts
    267

    Default

    YES YES YES. I have been working with standardbreds for years and years and they really are the most level-headed horses. I competed rather successfully in endurance with my guy, completing 50 mile rides up and down the east coast. We also cross trained in everything from dressage to pleasure driving to cross country jumping. These days he totes the beginners around, along with my other standardbred lesson horse. I never tell my beginners that 'standardbreds can't canter' and they don't have a problem getting either horse to do it. I've never met one that couldn't be taught to canter if it was done correctly. My only word of caution is to vet thoroughly before you buy/adopt, especially if you're going through a rescue. There are a handful on the east coast who do upper level dressage, including two at the PSG level, so it CAN be done. As for pacers... I've had no problem retraining them to trot and I've found it can actually be EASIER to convince them to canter than the trotters.



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Mar. 24, 2010
    Location
    Tucson
    Posts
    5,635

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by NowThatsATrot View Post
    They do make great riding horses. In ten years of working with them I have met very few who could not pick up the canter within a few rides under saddle, though like any young/green horse, they need time to build up the right muscles. Most of them will never be "10" movers, that's true, but they can generally manage the lower levels of dressage without a problem.

    Your best bet is to go shopping for one and evaluate for conformation and soundness just as you would any other horse, then work with someone who understands biomechanics and that the canter is a gait, not a speed. Do make sure that tack fits very well, because a little bit of discomfort will usually result in lateral gaiting, especially for the pacers. But don't be discouraged from looking at pacers -- a horse that is extremely hardwired to rack/pace is generally the exception, not the rule, and most learn to w/t/c just fine.

    Don't shy away from an otherwise suitable horse just because they have a race record, either. My old guy raced 222 times and still retired sound enough to humor me through a few years of LL eventing and hunter paces -- I've only retired him from jumping competition because he's got the start of a cataract in one eye. He takes a little maintenance (Adequan/joint supps), but nothing the average show horse doesn't already get as a matter of course.

    I adopted both of my horses from a rescue, but I'm on the wrong coast, unfortunately. A friend of mine in the PNW got her mare through Greener Pastures, which I think is based in BC, but I don't know much else in that area.

    Good luck!
    I love NowThatsATrot's blog and her horses. I haven't met many standardbreds other than on the track because they're not common in my area, but have always heard great things about them. I'm working with a Friesian cross who has a naturally lateral, unbalanced canter - so I would insist on seeing ANY horse canter before considering taking it in because I know how hard it is. But a standardbred having raced wouldn't scare me away; I would just want to see the horse and know for sure it had a canter with good rhythm. That applies to any breed or type, though - there's a thread on the board about a Lusitano with a lateral canter, and a lot of warmbloods actually have lateral canters naturally if they're bred for the trot with the canter ignored. (Not the high quality ones, of course, but lateral tendencies are definitely out there!)
    My horse is a dressage diva so I don't have to be.

    Quote Originally Posted by katarine
    If you have a fat gay horse that likes Parelli, you're really screwed



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Dec. 7, 2006
    Posts
    178

    Default Greener Pastures

    Here's a link to a Standardbred Adoption group located near Vancouver BC. If they are too far away they might know of similar groups on the American side of the border.

    http://www.greener-pastures.ca/



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Mar. 31, 2008
    Location
    Los Angeles
    Posts
    30

    Default

    I owned a Standardbred/Friesian cross in the past (she's a retired buddy horse now). Gorgeous horse, lovely mind, gave training her all every time....HORRIBLE canter. She was in full training for 2 years - finally got her to stop rushing and balance in the canter but it was always a struggle for her. Loved her though - such a great temperment.



  16. #16
    Join Date
    May. 17, 2010
    Posts
    47

    Default

    Thank you all for your replies. Have been having some internet problems lately (Satelite internet leaves a lot to be desired!), but now I'm up and running again.

    Myhorsefaith- I'm sooo jeallous!!! Lovely lovely.

    ace**- Thanks for the link. I went in and looked through all their horses, and the one you sent me a link on is the one I would chose also. What a sweety, you can just see he is a character... reminds me of my paint actually.

    I think I'm going to have to get one, I'm convinced!
    Now I have to talk hubby into it



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