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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun. 10, 2001
    Location
    Rising Sun, Maryland, USA
    Posts
    5,135

    Default Trees for wetland area in horse field

    I recently got a a "buffer in a bag" (well actually 2 they had extras). I wanted to plant some trees in the wetland area of a horse field and some by the stream where no horses are.

    The trees included in the buffer are:
    American Plum
    Swamp White Oak
    River Birch
    Silky Dogwood
    Red-Osier Dogwood

    Are there any which I shouldn't plant in the horse field for toxicity reasons?

    What would be the best and easiest way to protect them while they are growing?

    They recommended tree shelters, with the tubex.com being the brand they included info about.
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  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov. 2, 2001
    Location
    In Jingle Town
    Posts
    35,059

    Default

    those tree shelters look alright but for for my personal taste I'd still would like to have a cage around the trees to prevent the horses from pushing them over and impaling themselves on the shelter tube.

    Kind of like a three sided Y shape cage, wrapped with chicken wire, possibly barbed wire around the top. Those also keep teh trees protected when they are growing past those tubes. Horses do have quiet a reach.

    The plastic tubes would also keep other critters from eating the saplings.


    Birch sounds good to me.
    There was another thread about threes in pasture (wet conditions, incidentally) with a link to the Cornell page with the toxic plants.
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  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun. 4, 2002
    Location
    Suffolk, VA
    Posts
    16,684

    Default

    Cypress would also work. Lots of them around here. River Birch are fantastic trees. I love mine and they grow fast.



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan. 9, 2006
    Location
    Maryland
    Posts
    378

    Default

    Here is a list of the species NOT to plant: http://www.equisearch.com/farm_ranch...nt/eqtoxic436/

    Oaks are on the list.

    The dogwoods are considered shrubs and won't get much over 15' tall.

    I second the idea of cypress and another idea is tulip poplar.
    Alison Howard
    Homestead Farms, Maryland www.freshorganicvegetables.com



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug. 10, 2010
    Location
    Western NY
    Posts
    1,874

    Default

    Thank you for that great link Benson.



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr. 23, 1999
    Location
    Rosehill, TX
    Posts
    7,092

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Benson View Post
    Here is a list of the species NOT to plant: http://www.equisearch.com/farm_ranch...nt/eqtoxic436/

    Oaks are on the list.

    The dogwoods are considered shrubs and won't get much over 15' tall.

    I second the idea of cypress and another idea is tulip poplar.
    link from your link

    http://southcampus.colostate.edu/poi...ees-plants.mht

    a more extensive list of what to shy away from

    Cultivated Trees and Plants Potentially Poisonous to Animals

    The following commonly available trees, shrubs and plants are often sold through plant nurseries, and pose a potential hazard to animals if they are planted in or around animal enclosures. If these plants are found to be desirable for landscaping purposes, it is important to position the plants well away from where animals can reach them. Furthermore it is essential to always provide a balanced nutritious diet to animals at all times so that they are not driven through hunger to eating unusual plant material. It is also important to remember that the careless disposal of tree and plant prunnings into an animal enclosure is a frequent cause of poisoning.

    Trees
    Black walnutJuglans nigra
    Red Maple and its hybrids Acer rubrum
    Oak Quercus spp.
    Black locust Robinia pseudoacacia
    Golden chain tree Laburnum anagyroides
    Horse chestnut, buckeye Aesculus spp
    Chokecherry Prunus spp.
    Kentucky coffee tree Gymnocladus dioica
    Russian Olive Elaeagnus angustifolia
    Persimmon Diospyros virginiana
    Chinese tallow tree Sapium sebiferum (mildly toxic)

    Shrubs
    Yew Taxus spp.
    Oleander Nerium oleander
    Yellow oleander Thevetia spp.
    Privet Ligustrum spp.
    Hydrangea Hydrangea spp.
    Rhododendron (azalea) Rhododendron spp.
    Japanese Pieris Pieris japonica
    Laurel Kalmia spp.
    Black laurel Leucothoe davisiae
    Boxwood Buxus sempervirens
    Burning bush Euonymus atropurpurens
    Lantana Lantana camara
    Angels Trumpet Brugmansia spp.
    Mesquite Prosopis veluntina
    Day or night blooming Jasmine Cestrum diurnum, C. nocturnum

    Vines
    Carolina jessamine Gelsemium sempervirens
    Virginia creeper Parthenocissus quinquefolia

    Perennial Plants
    Fox glove Digitalis purpurea
    Larkspur Delphinium spp.
    Monkshood Aconitum spp.
    Lupines Lupinus spp.
    Hairy vetch Vicia villosa
    Crown vetch Coronilla spp.
    Castor bean Ricinus communis
    Last edited by SGray; Apr. 24, 2012 at 04:39 PM. Reason: format
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  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan. 26, 2006
    Location
    Fort Worth, Texas
    Posts
    5,642

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Daydream Believer View Post
    Cypress would also work. Lots of them around here. .
    Cypress are draught hardy also... we have then here in Texas and they are still alive after the worst draught in sixty years

    As for that list of trees posted above.... I believe nearly every one of those are pretty common in Kentucky pastures



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov. 18, 2010
    Location
    california
    Posts
    5,041

    Default

    I have yet to see a horse facility without Oak trees in our area...



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb. 9, 2005
    Location
    Ocala, FL
    Posts
    1,935

    Default

    I think the problem with oaks is the acorns..... I know more than one horse who has colicked from eating acorns.

    As far as dogwoods are concerned, they get to be big trees here in Ocala....

    What about sweetgum? WHite cedar (nice wildlife tree), sycamore, redbud, sweetbay magnolia (nice small magnolia type flowers).. here's a list:

    http://www.mortonarb.org/tree-plant-...wet-sites.html
    NOTE this is not a list of safe trees, just wetland tolerant trees! But i think all the ones I listed above are safe - I know my horses eat the magnolias!



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Feb. 16, 2003
    Location
    MI USA
    Posts
    8,004

    Default

    No one has mentioned willows, which come in a big variety, LOVE being wet. Safe for horses to chew.

    I have several willow planted in my wet area, along with a couple Oaks and a Cottonwood, which also loves being wet. The Oaks I grew from acorns, they are Burr Oaks, take wet and dry, still do fine.

    I purchased the Willows, Curly (upright growth), Babylonian (big weeper), because they drink LOTS of water, so with time I hope to have a MUCH LESS wet place. I am also topping the willows off, to prevent great height. I want them spreading their roots widely, big thick trunks, but not much height. I think the correct term is "pollarding" them to a matching height. I have seen photos of this practice in the Netherlands, along their big drainage ditches, to help drink up excess water and hold the banks solidly when the water drains fast.

    I have just purchased a London Plane tree, similar but larger than a Sycamore. It will be a sort of speciman tree, alone in his space, also drinking LOTS of water I hope. He goes in the swale hole, which has a semi-permanent ponding going on. Tag promises 80-100ft tall, with 100ft width! Hoping for some shade in time. I probably won't live to see that full growth, but it should be very pretty to look at, alone in the field.

    Tulip poplars are among the faster growing of large trees, along with being Native so they manage in all sorts of settings.

    I do haul water to these planted trees the first couple years, if we have dry stretches of time, with high heat, in summer. They get a few gallons every week out of a muck tub in the gator. Siphon hose is easier than carrying buckets! They survive with this bit of help, then go along fine as they get larger, have the deeper roots. I mow around small trees, 4ft or less, so the grass doesn't slurp up all the water first.

    All my trees are protected from the horses with a fence, so they can't reach the trees. Winter need for forage by the horses, means they would kill the trees quickly without the fences.



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jul. 6, 2005
    Posts
    256

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Daydream Believer View Post
    Cypress would also work. Lots of them around here. River Birch are fantastic trees. I love mine and they grow fast.
    Do you have River Birch in your pasture? I love those trees, but the ones in my pasture haven't done all that well. My other trees have faired fine, but the river birch doesn't seem to like it. Could be something else entirely, I was just curious on your experience.



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jul. 6, 2005
    Posts
    256

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by goodhors View Post
    No one has mentioned willows, which come in a big variety, LOVE being wet. Safe for horses to chew.

    I have several willow planted in my wet area, along with a couple Oaks and a Cottonwood, which also loves being wet. The Oaks I grew from acorns, they are Burr Oaks, take wet and dry, still do fine.

    I purchased the Willows, Curly (upright growth), Babylonian (big weeper), because they drink LOTS of water, so with time I hope to have a MUCH LESS wet place. I am also topping the willows off, to prevent great height. I want them spreading their roots widely, big thick trunks, but not much height. I think the correct term is "pollarding" them to a matching height. I have seen photos of this practice in the Netherlands, along their big drainage ditches, to help drink up excess water and hold the banks solidly when the water drains fast.

    I have just purchased a London Plane tree, similar but larger than a Sycamore. It will be a sort of speciman tree, alone in his space, also drinking LOTS of water I hope. He goes in the swale hole, which has a semi-permanent ponding going on. Tag promises 80-100ft tall, with 100ft width! Hoping for some shade in time. I probably won't live to see that full growth, but it should be very pretty to look at, alone in the field.

    Tulip poplars are among the faster growing of large trees, along with being Native so they manage in all sorts of settings.

    I do haul water to these planted trees the first couple years, if we have dry stretches of time, with high heat, in summer. They get a few gallons every week out of a muck tub in the gator. Siphon hose is easier than carrying buckets! They survive with this bit of help, then go along fine as they get larger, have the deeper roots. I mow around small trees, 4ft or less, so the grass doesn't slurp up all the water first.

    All my trees are protected from the horses with a fence, so they can't reach the trees. Winter need for forage by the horses, means they would kill the trees quickly without the fences.
    I definitely agree with the fencing -- trees are a magnet for chewing! I love willows and plane trees are amazing. What about a Sycamore? They love wet locations are beautiful and also grow very large...



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