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  1. #1
    Join Date
    May. 9, 2001
    Posts
    2,515

    Default

    At the suggestion of foxhunt4me (Joel), I am posting my experiences as someone new to foxhunting. It is my hope that people can follow this thread and learn one way to get started, give me some good advice, and have a laugh or two. I'll add new posts as things happen, but here are the events to date:

    I posted "Questions from a newbie" on this forum asking people how to get started in foxhunting. I received great advice from people encouraging me to find a hunt in my area and offer to volunteer for them. Joel, a member of North Hills Hunt (NHH) found my post (thanks to the person who let him know it was there!), told me a bit about the hunt, and invited me to volunteer at NHH's hunter/jumper show.

    At the show I met many members of the hunt, including the MFHs and the Huntsman. A wonderful member of NHH took me under her wing and introduced me to just about everyone under the sun. Apparently I made a good impression, since I was "discussed" at a board meeting (or so I was told [img]/infopop/emoticons/icon_wink.gif[/img]), and accepted into the hunt. Although I haven't yet received an engraved invitation, NHH was more than happy to take my check to become a basic member! At this membership level, I can attend all social functions and pay capping for hunting. If/when I find a horse, I plan to upgrade to a riding membership.

    Speaking of horses, I'm on a mission to find a good mount as my first field hunter. Since I'm not used to shopping for field hunters, it's hard to know what is a fair price for a certain horse. Luckily, the NHH members have connections to people with horses, and I have many horse people whom I can ask for opinions on the price of certain horses. I've found a promising prospect, and as I type I am waiting for a call back on this horse. I don't want to jinx anything, but please keep your fingers for some luck to come my way. This will also be the first time I've owned my own horse, so it's really a dream come true for me. Hopefully my next post will be about going to see the horse!

    I've ordered and read "Riding to Hounds in America" by Wadsworth, and I've been diligently practicing tying my stock tie. Maybe I should have bought the pre-tied kind... I have tan breeches and boots, and I ordered a tweed from England (very favorable price!). If I get past cubbing, I have narrowed my choice for a hunt coat to two models. I'll also put in a good word for wearing ASTM/SEI certified helmets, and am adding a velvet helmet to my riding wardrobe, since my schooling helmet is not exactly elegant or traditional in appearance.

    I am a little nervous about actually hunting, afraid that I won't be confident enough to keep up with the pace. I'm planning to go with the hilltop group at least the first two times out, and I'd like to take some jumping lessons this summer (just to refresh my memory!). I'm also a bit worried that I'll commit a faux pas with respect to the etiquette of the hunt field, but I'm hoping a few more readings of "Riding to Hounds in America" will prevent this from happening. Oh, and I've also wondered how suitable my Prix des Nations is for hunting. I might try a gel seat cover on it and see how it goes before looking for somthing comfier. I'm trying to do all of this on a budget, and a new saddle is not exactly part of that budget at the moment.

    I think that's all for now, and I'll keep you updated as things happen. I hope I'll be posting soon about the horse!

    Jill
    NHH



  2. #2
    Join Date
    May. 9, 2001
    Posts
    2,515

    Default

    At the suggestion of foxhunt4me (Joel), I am posting my experiences as someone new to foxhunting. It is my hope that people can follow this thread and learn one way to get started, give me some good advice, and have a laugh or two. I'll add new posts as things happen, but here are the events to date:

    I posted "Questions from a newbie" on this forum asking people how to get started in foxhunting. I received great advice from people encouraging me to find a hunt in my area and offer to volunteer for them. Joel, a member of North Hills Hunt (NHH) found my post (thanks to the person who let him know it was there!), told me a bit about the hunt, and invited me to volunteer at NHH's hunter/jumper show.

    At the show I met many members of the hunt, including the MFHs and the Huntsman. A wonderful member of NHH took me under her wing and introduced me to just about everyone under the sun. Apparently I made a good impression, since I was "discussed" at a board meeting (or so I was told [img]/infopop/emoticons/icon_wink.gif[/img]), and accepted into the hunt. Although I haven't yet received an engraved invitation, NHH was more than happy to take my check to become a basic member! At this membership level, I can attend all social functions and pay capping for hunting. If/when I find a horse, I plan to upgrade to a riding membership.

    Speaking of horses, I'm on a mission to find a good mount as my first field hunter. Since I'm not used to shopping for field hunters, it's hard to know what is a fair price for a certain horse. Luckily, the NHH members have connections to people with horses, and I have many horse people whom I can ask for opinions on the price of certain horses. I've found a promising prospect, and as I type I am waiting for a call back on this horse. I don't want to jinx anything, but please keep your fingers for some luck to come my way. This will also be the first time I've owned my own horse, so it's really a dream come true for me. Hopefully my next post will be about going to see the horse!

    I've ordered and read "Riding to Hounds in America" by Wadsworth, and I've been diligently practicing tying my stock tie. Maybe I should have bought the pre-tied kind... I have tan breeches and boots, and I ordered a tweed from England (very favorable price!). If I get past cubbing, I have narrowed my choice for a hunt coat to two models. I'll also put in a good word for wearing ASTM/SEI certified helmets, and am adding a velvet helmet to my riding wardrobe, since my schooling helmet is not exactly elegant or traditional in appearance.

    I am a little nervous about actually hunting, afraid that I won't be confident enough to keep up with the pace. I'm planning to go with the hilltop group at least the first two times out, and I'd like to take some jumping lessons this summer (just to refresh my memory!). I'm also a bit worried that I'll commit a faux pas with respect to the etiquette of the hunt field, but I'm hoping a few more readings of "Riding to Hounds in America" will prevent this from happening. Oh, and I've also wondered how suitable my Prix des Nations is for hunting. I might try a gel seat cover on it and see how it goes before looking for somthing comfier. I'm trying to do all of this on a budget, and a new saddle is not exactly part of that budget at the moment.

    I think that's all for now, and I'll keep you updated as things happen. I hope I'll be posting soon about the horse!

    Jill
    NHH



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul. 14, 2000
    Location
    midwest
    Posts
    11,068

    Default

    It sounds like you are well on your way to a successful hunting season with your enthusiasm and desire to try to do things right! Don't be too afraid of making a mistake on the hunt field as most folks are very forgiving and have been the "newbie" at least once in their life! [img]/infopop/emoticons/icon_smile.gif[/img] A sincere "I'm sorry" does wonders! [img]/infopop/emoticons/icon_smile.gif[/img]

    Ask around the hunt to see if anyone is "downsizing" or "upgrading" their horses. Often a horse which is no longer suitable for the role of a Staff horse- hunting weekly at the pace Staff hunts- or the role of a passionate member who hunts weekly plus, would be perfect for someone just starting out. For example, in our 4-H Club a number of kids "gaming/racing" horses came up for sale at the end of winter and they were immediately snatched up by other club members just starting out in the gaming classes. There is such a value to a horse who is sane and experienced in the area one wants to have success/fun in!

    Don't rule out eBay for hunting attire. I have picked up fabulous things- plain, flat, heavy duty bridles, vest, coats etc. over there. It is a good place, especially if you don't mind used equipment. I rarely see "new" things priced better than what I can find at my local or catalog tack supply sources.

    Good luck!
    SLW



  4. #4
    Join Date
    May. 9, 2001
    Posts
    2,515

    Default

    Ok, I've spent the last 24 hours with horse on the brain... Thinking about this promising prospect, hoping to hear from the owner, wondering why the horse is inexpensive. I finally did hear from the owner, and it turns out that the horse has bad feet. As in hoof walls that need to be reinforced by chemicals not found in nature. As in EXPENSIVE shoeing, and a very good potential of having a lame horse.

    So, I decided to call a woman I know that owns some horses at a local barn. I met her a few months ago while horse-sitting for a friend, and she said that I should come out and ride her horse Louis sometime. When my friend returned, I asked her about this horse (she did some training with him, and gives lessons to the owner and her daughter), and my friend said that the woman's draft mare would be a better horse for me. Well, the draft mare has just had a foal, and clearly won't be able to be put into work for several months.

    Now, I could be wrong here, but I think my friend steered me away from Louis because he is a nice horse, and she was hoping to get a commission in his eventual sale. Anyway, since I've now decided that I'm in the market for a horse, I called the owner to see if I might be able to buy him. Luckily, she remembered me from the barn, and said she would be happy to sell him to me, but that she thought he would be out of my price range, which he is. BUT, she did say that she would be happy to lease him to me (she's not advertising him for sale), and that I could "lease with an option to buy". Needless to say, I'm excited!

    The horse in question is a 9 year old sane and sound Appendix QH who has been evented. He's not fond of dressage or jumping in an arena, so his owner would really like to see him being ridden outside (there is a very large park adjoining the stables with trails). I asked if she thought he would be suitable for foxhunting, and she said yes. Not that color matters, but he is a beautiful grey, AND he has good feet (he's currently barefoot). I asked what the lease fees would be, and there will be nothing beyond board, feed, and hoof trimming/shoeing, which I would be paying for with my own horse anyway. I'm also expecting vet bills to be worked in some how, but the owner has family in town for the weekend, so I am going to call her next week to work out all of the details.

    I am so excited! Not only will I have a horse for all intents and purposes, I will be able to get back into riding shape well before hunting season. I guess the lesson of today is the old adage "It can't hurt to ask". I'm hoping this will end up being a long-term arrangement, and that if things are going well I'll be able to buy Louis eventually.

    I'll be seeing the friend whom I suspect wanted a sales commission on the horse this weekend, and I'll have to be careful about how I tell her about the lease. I'd like to take jumping lessons from her, so maybe that will help things a little bit.

    I hope this post isn't too hard to understand. Bottom line is it looks like I'll have a mount as of next week! My only dilemma is that he has a longish, dark-grey mane that looks very nice right now, and being the braider that I am, I think I will feel the need to pull it to "proper" length.

    Thanks for everyone who is following. Oh, and here's a question: What type of shoes should a field hunter wear? I'm in eastern Nebraska, to give you an idea of geographic location.

    Jill
    NHH



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun. 1, 2001
    Location
    Rosco, GA
    Posts
    1,929

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    Hello and it's great to see new people enjoy foxhunting. I have a couple of suggestions:
    1. Join the MFHA as a subscriber. They have a website and fight to preserve foxhunting.
    2. Remember that it's all about the hounds; learn as much as you can about the different breeds and their characteristics, about what breeds are prefered for the territory you hunt, and what your Master is breeding.
    Many people who first start hunting are so busy riding they forget to pay attention to the drama unfolding around them - the action and performance of the hounds. Oh, and just a tip: don't talk much, introduce yourself, though, and don't yell "ware hole" every few secconds!
    have fun,
    xeroxchick



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug. 14, 2000
    Location
    Clarksdale, MS--the golden buckle on the cotton belt
    Posts
    20,349

    Default

    We have four or five people who hunt in them, including a couple of whippers-in.
    "I'm a lumberjack, and I'm okay."
    Thread killer Extraordinaire



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec. 18, 2000
    Location
    Near the Itchetucknee.Ft.White Fl.
    Posts
    3,896

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    Hi xeroxchick,welcome to COTHBB,it is so nice to get some action on this board,thank you for contributing,the more the merrier.Who do you hunt with,maybe you could get them to post on my "How to Start Hunting", thread so Georgia can have a representative there. [img]/infopop/emoticons/icon_wink.gif[/img] [img]/infopop/emoticons/icon_wink.gif[/img] [img]/infopop/emoticons/icon_wink.gif[/img]

    fernie fox
    "I have lived my life-it is nearly done-.I have played the game all round;But I freely admit that the best of my fun I owe it to Horse and Hound".
    \"I have lived my life-it is nearly done-.I have played the game all round;But I freely admit that the best of my fun I owe it to Horse and Hound\".



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep. 16, 1999
    Posts
    831

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    Jill -

    Apologies in advance for the stream of consciousness/random thoughts format that will follow. As I type this message, I am darting between duties while trying to inhale something that could very loosely be described as lunch. (It's way too intense a shade of orange for something that is neither a fruit nor vegetable...hum...) So here goes...

    Congratulations on being invited to join NHH! They sound like such a great group.

    The Louis-the-horse possibility sounds very promising and exciting. But if for whatever reason that doesn't work out, it sounds like you are making lots of contacts to track down other horse options. Good...always nice to have a "Plan B".

    As far as the horse shoes for foxhunting, here are a couple things to consider.
    1) Stay away from aluminum - they are not durable enough to withstand the rigors of foxhunting.

    2) Traction - During the part of the season where the ground is frozen (and for how long is that in IA/NE? [img]/infopop/emoticons/icon_wink.gif[/img]) , many foxhunters I know use either studs or borium on the shoes for traction. Often time "rimmed shoes" are used as the base shoe, because of the supposed traction that they provide.

    3) Pads - Part of the territory where my horse and I hunt is very rocky...plus he has very flat soles. As such, it is imperative to keep pads on his front feet during hunting season. Obviously, this will vary with the specifics of the territory and the conformation of the horse's foot, but it is worth keeping this in mind. (A stone bruise can "bench" you and your horse for the season. Argh.)

    Tack items to consider:

    1) Breastplate - The need for this will vary with the horse and topography, etc. But again, something to keep in mind.

    2) Gel saddle pad - As with any horse-related gear, some people love them, some people hate them, and some people don't have and opinion one way or the other. My horse and I are in the "love" gel pad category. After 3+ hours hunting, having a gel pad makes a big difference for both of us.

    Clothing, gifts, living vicariously, etc. - It is well worth the while to be put on the mailing list to receive the catalog from Horse Country in Warrenton, VA (800-882-HUNT). This is a terrific store that specializes in foxhunting apparel, tack, appointments, gifts, etc. They have a great selection and wonderful items. It's so nice to go into a store that is brimming with foxhunting stuff!

    If at some point you decide to invest in a top quality (yes, with a price to match...sigh) frock coat or hunting jacket, you might want to check out the selection carried by Horse Country. Their coats come in a variety of weights of fabric, are absolutely "correct" in all the details and styling, and are durable - that all-important quality that foxhunters hold in such high esteem whether it be in attire, tack, horses, or themselves! [img]/infopop/emoticons/icon_wink.gif[/img]

    Well, that's all for now.

    Thanks for letting us know how it's going.

    And belated Happy Birthday wishes. I believe that you mentioned on another thread about your recent birthday. Sounds like you received a great present...foxhunting!



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Sep. 26, 2000
    Location
    Nebraska
    Posts
    1,387

    Default

    Hey Sister and all - some comments.

    1) Stay away from aluminum - they are not durable enough to withstand the rigors of foxhunting.

    Agreed and Titanium is too expensive!

    2) Traction - During the part of the season where the ground is frozen (and for how long is that in IA/NE? ).

    I use rim shoes - they are called "event" on the box I find these have nice overall traction. Farrier does not charge extra either ( $ 60 for 4 new )

    Winter - From about December 1 on until Spring thaw - late Feb Early March. Borium - don't leave home without it when the ground freezes. If the conditions are mild in the winter some folks do go out without it especially in our less hilly fixtures. I know of nobody in the hunt that uses studs - too much hassle. Borium ( most farriers here use DRILLTEC actually ) welded on runs almost 2 times the cost of a regular shoe.

    I pull the shoes this time of year and do not hunt my TB/ Cleveland Bay cross as I dont think he needs the joint stress due to old injuries.

    3) Pads -

    Our terrain is generally not rocky other than gravel roads. Most horses do not need pads. Brush on Venice Turpentine on the ( soles only ) hoof after each trimming for a few days and your horses soles will get a lot harder. My horse is 'ouchy ' on roads if I do not do this. Straight Betadine also will do this but more slowly.

    Tack items to consider:

    ) Breastplate -

    I use one - great going up steep embankments, terraces etc to keep the saddle from sliding and to have a handhold.

    2) Gel saddle pad -

    My wife can not hunt without it ( back surgery a while back ) I use a Crosby Sofride saddle and can ride for hours without saddle sores. I use a closed cell foam 'thinline ' pad.

    Clothing, gifts, living vicariously, etc.

    There are 2 local tack shops that carry 'english' tack and apparrel. You will be able to find almost anything you need there or get it ordered but it will not be as cheap as a catalog. Regg+ Wallys in Elkhorn NE also carries logo merchandise with our hunt logo's where the profit goes to the hunt.

    Sometimes used gear is available ( Coats mainly )
    from members that gave up hunting or grew out of it.

    Our MFH's make great allowances for new members and guests in the attire and tack area. You do need a hardhat, we have people occasionally riding in western tack etc. Key issues for attire are:

    Safe, Comfortable, Clean , Plain ( no bright colors , flashy parts etc.

    If you have tan breeches, boots and a show coat of some kind you will fit in just fine.


    FYI, Riders not in correct attire are expected to ride at the rear of the group ( in fron of the Secretary of course ) . But that is where you will be anyway for a while!

    Sue and I will be glad to see some new folks back there now that we can move up - I was awarded my Colors and Sue was awarded her Buttons at the annual meeting in April. Now I just have to figure out how to come up with $1000 for new Scarlet jacket, White breeches, Brown Topped boots, etc.

    Women have it easy they sew the colors on the collar and add patent leather tops to the boot - we can drive over to Dehners and get that done easily.


    Joel

    Thanx



  10. #10
    Join Date
    May. 9, 2001
    Posts
    2,515

    Default

    Thanks for the replies everyone! I do have a couple of questions:

    What exactly IS borium? Is it the same as "bohrium", which is the same as "unnilseptium", atomic number 107 on the periodic table of elements [img]/infopop/emoticons/icon_confused.gif[/img] Is it the oxychloride that bohrium decays to? Before putting this on a horse, I'd like to have an idea of what it is. I've heard lots of things about borium, but I don't actually know what it is. I also read about using nails with borium on the end as a substitute for borium on the shoe. Does anybody have experience with this?

    Do you use gel pads for the horse, rider, or both? Does the rider feel a difference when a gel pad is used on the horse? I've never used one before, so I have no clue as to their impact. Do you have any other "creature comfort" recommendations?

    Whistlejacket, I took full advantage of my recent birthday and received lots of horsey stuff from my mom. My dad, when told I was getting started in hunting, wisely sent a check. I'm very particular about tack, so that I like to buy on my own. I buy almost exclusively through catalogs or overseas online, which can be nice with respect to price, but sometimes things need to be returned. I will call Horse Country to get on their mailing list, and have found The Old Habit's website. I don't know how cold the weather will be for hunting, so I'm not sure if the heavy-duty melton is in order, or if a lighter wool will do (any suggestions Joel?).

    Yes, this birthday has been about the best ever for me! [img]/infopop/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif[/img] Starting into the world of foxhunting, getting to know a wonderful group of horse people, finding a great horse to lease... I'll let everyone know when the lease is official, but until then I can't breathe a sigh of relief and contentment. Louis is a nice horse, nicer than anything I was looking at before I thought to call his owner. I don't seem to be the luckiest person in the world (last year on my birthday I got a speeding ticket [img]/infopop/emoticons/icon_rolleyes.gif[/img]), but this may be a rare instance where everything harmoniously comes together and works. At least I hope it will be!

    Thanks again to everyone! I'll keep you posted!
    Jill
    NHH



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Sep. 26, 2000
    Location
    Nebraska
    Posts
    1,387

    Default

    Borium - a common term for all amalgams applied to the bottom of horeshoes. In my understanding Borium was a brand name. Our farrier uses what is tha brand name Drill - Tec. Drill Tec consists of a brass carrier metal with crystals of tungsten carbide ( HARD! ) in it. This is fired on to the shoe. The WC is sharp and is the gripping power for traction, the brass is soft so as it wears , new crystals are exposed to keep cutting surfaces.
    I remember that the original boruum was a slightly different composition but the same concept.


    Other alternatives are: Studs ( if you have the time ). EZBoots that have studs now - you buy a set of 4 and slip them on before a hunt and then take them off. The mentioned Borium nails - I know of a few folks using these - not all farriers will put them on or carry them.

    Just remember if you have kicking issues in your barn / pasture, the borium nails and borium will make any injuries ( especially kicks to bony areas ) much more severe. If your horse overreaches, the borium on the front of the rear shoes can do some damage to the front feet etc.


    Look at the concrete floors in barns like Quail Run and you will be able to tell where horses with Borium were kept in the winter. The concrete is scored up ( remember to turn your horse in wide corners with borium on on conccrete - there is a lot of stress on the joints with borium when not on a forgiving surface. )

    Gel pads etc. Remember in hunting - less is more - you should try to keep tack to a minimum if possible. A lot of 'traditionalists ' ride in saddles without any saddle pad and without fillis pads in the stirrups. Sue useses the gel pad on top of the seat for her comfort - not sure it helps the horse - there are those gel pads that help horses with back soreness.

    To the purist, a horse properly turned out for the hunt field has no or minimal saddle pad, a breastplate, plain flat bridle with no flashy buckles etc. A snaffle bit on heavy reins, no bell or brushing boots. Well trimmed / roached / braided mane , perhaps a tail in a mud knot.
    >> You will see few purists at NHH but look at the pictures of Matthew, our huntsman on the website - his horse was always properly turned out like this - most of us reserve this hassle for opening hunt! <<

    Also - as far as saddle pads go in general - if you saddle fits you horse , you should not need much of a pad - you should not try to compensate for a poorly fitting saddle with pads if you can avoid it. But you knew that I bet!


    Happy Birthday!! I think I can even remember when I was your age!


    Joel

    Thanx



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jun. 1, 2001
    Location
    Rosco, GA
    Posts
    1,929

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    Many people think that event horses will make immediate field hunters. I have seen a lot of problems with this. Be prepared to spend a lot of time on group dynamics, hound tolerance and walk walk walk.
    Hello fernie fox, I've hunted with Midland for eleven years.



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Aug. 14, 2000
    Location
    Clarksdale, MS--the golden buckle on the cotton belt
    Posts
    20,349

    Default

    and on your wife's. That is so great!

    Now you too will be one of the "red-coated bastards." Just be sure your helmet for Mars has a secure connection to the new coat's oxygen tank.

    BTW, how is your summer Martian pack of PMS hounds doing this season?
    "I'm a lumberjack, and I'm okay."
    Thread killer Extraordinaire



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Sep. 26, 2000
    Location
    Nebraska
    Posts
    1,387

    Default

    Well, maybe I can use the excuse for not having a Scarlet coat that I dont want to be a red coated bastard! Sounds better than I dont have the money left in my 'fun fund"

    Oh by the way the wife and I just happened to stop in the tack shop Saturday and they just happened to have a new shipment of saddles come in and they just happened to have one in her size ( Collegiate Senior Event ) and in a wide tree that she needs for her horse and it fit and she needed new leathers and maybe a girth and .... there goes the $$$ fund. It is not a high $$ saddle but hopefully it will last a few seasons - she actually only hunts about 4 - 5 times a year max. She can use that for hacking and hunting.

    I miss the old Red Planet - those pink sunrises - the 200mph breezes off the icecaps.... due to the high price of rocket fuel I have not been back home for a while.


    Joel

    Thanx



  15. #15
    Join Date
    May. 9, 2001
    Posts
    2,515

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    I'm glad that I don't have to get a new saddle and that, if this lease works out, I won't have the purchase price of a horse. Joel, I think your wife will like her new saddle. We had one at the barn where I taught, and it was comfy for hacking.

    Xeroxchick, thanks for the warning about eventers. This particular horse hasn't been competed for a few years, and has mainly been taken through the park that is adjacent to the stables. I'm planning on taking him out on rides with other horses/riders from the barn to see how he reacts in a group setting. So far, he seems very level-headed and not at all hyper, and I am hoping to be able to go to many cubbings to get him used to the hounds.

    The story of this horse is that the owner bought him for her son as an "all around" horse, to do a bit of jumping, a bit of dressage, and to be a pleasure mount. The son was in a very bad automobile accident which left him severely disabled, and he cannot ride the horse any longer. So, the horse has sentimental value for the family, but he's not being used. I don't think the family would ever consider selling him to an unknown party off the street, but is glad to have someone to give him time and attention. I'm planning on long rides through the park at a walk to allow us to get used to each other and in shape from going up and down hills. At least he'll get in shape that way; I need more drastic measures.

    On the shoeing issue I'll have to talk to the farrier, but I'm leaning more toward studs than borium. Do field hunters regularly have shoes on all four feet, or do any have shoes only on the front?

    Well Joel, if I ever were to earn colors, I'm glad I could stay in black. I think the French blue and gold look quite smashing with black. And my fun fund is not yet healthy enough to accomodate Dehners, so I'll have to ride in my relatively cheap boots. My plan of marrying well to finance my equestrian hobbies has not panned out so far...

    Well, waiting until I finalize this lease is like a minor form of torture. Patience, patience, patience...



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Sep. 26, 2000
    Location
    Nebraska
    Posts
    1,387

    Default

    Sounds nice - that would not happen to be Rafael's horse would it ? - it sounds like it , a real tragedy, I used to watch him at the Dressage shows - I lost touch when I left the Dressage circles for high - adrenaline sport , but we were all hoping that he would be back in the saddle someday. Now I am depressed just remembering the poor kid. Had a nice family - good horse people too.

    I have seen some folks with horses with feet of stone that only hunt occasionally leave the rears unshod - ride off the gravel roads as much as possible. If you are hunting during ice season I would not recommend leaving your main source of power without shoes with traction. You could always go the EZ Boot route for the rears - talk to me about my secret way to keep them on.

    FYI - the local tack hops sell 'studs ' that are just disks of a borium like material.

    Thanx



  17. #17
    Join Date
    May. 9, 2001
    Posts
    2,515

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    Yes Joel, the horse is Rafael's, and he and his mother are making a most generous offer to me. They are great people, with nice horses, and I really couldn't have hoped for a better situation.

    In other news, I came across a deal on a saddle that I couldn't refuse. It's for a Crosby Sofride Event, so I think I'll be looking to sell the Prix des Nation. The PDN is nice, but I like comfort in life.

    The studs of a borium-like material interest me... I'll have to talk to the farrier about them.

    Until next time,
    Jill
    NHH



  18. #18
    Join Date
    Sep. 26, 2000
    Location
    Nebraska
    Posts
    1,387

    Default

    Sounds good.

    Crosby sofride event - well I LOVE mine - I have ridden in it for 3 seasons now, feels great still. I think that you will like it !

    Talk to Sam at Regg+Wally's

    about those studs - she can get them for you if they are not in stock. Just have the farrier drill and tap the shoes after thanksgiving and put yer plugs in there. Make sure to get the fit with the plugs, lubricant and a spare tap for cleaning out the threads ( a squeeze bottle of water helps too) .
    Regg and Wally's Tack&Saddlery 1040 N. 204 th ave ( Route 31 ) Elkhorn. 402-289-1175, -800-666-REGG.


    Happy Trails.

    Thanx



  19. #19
    Join Date
    May. 9, 2001
    Posts
    2,515

    Default

    The owner of Louis, the horse I will be leasing, called today. I am going to start with Louis the day after tomorrow, and as of June 20th, he's all mine! [img]/infopop/emoticons/icon_smile.gif[/img] (The owner's daughter is riding him a bit until she goes to Spain).

    What is so nice about this is that all parties concerned want what's best for the horse, and it's really nice to be working with someone who is not just trying to make a buck. The owner even asked how much I could afford to pay for him, and said she could come down on the price if things go well. In any case, with "leasing to own", I think I will have him paid off in two years, or I could probably pay the purchase price balance after one year of leasing.

    Another great thing is that the owner thinks that Louis will really enjoy being a field hunter, which is great. A happy horse makes for a much happier rider...

    Gee, I feel like things are going so well, that there's a bombshell of some sort around the corner. I'll take pictures of Louis soon, and maybe my good friend Joel can help me figure out how to put them into cyberspace so everyone can see him. [img]/infopop/emoticons/icon_wink.gif[/img]

    Jill
    NHH



  20. #20
    Join Date
    Feb. 24, 1999
    Location
    NY
    Posts
    890

    Default

    Get your lease/purchase agreement in writing.If he turns out to be a fabulous hunter she may get better offers for him than you are offering.Just cover yourself.



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