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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar. 26, 2006
    Posts
    26

    Default Maple trees-toxicity-sugar vs. red

    I am aware of red maple leaves and their potential toxic effect upon horses if they ingest a certain amount. I just read some info on Cornell University's site that indicates that sugar and silver maples may be equally toxic.

    We are just finishing pastures for our new farm. We recently transplanted some medium sized sugar maples for future shade cover for our horses. Now am thinking we need to pull them out due to potential risks.

    Any opinions or experiences with other types of maples?

    Thanks!



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar. 26, 2006
    Posts
    26

    Default

    Here is the link to the Cornell info:

    http://www.ansci.cornell.edu/plants/maple.html



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul. 6, 2005
    Posts
    256

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by mstraebel View Post
    I am aware of red maple leaves and their potential toxic effect upon horses if they ingest a certain amount. I just read some info on Cornell University's site that indicates that sugar and silver maples may be equally toxic.

    We are just finishing pastures for our new farm. We recently transplanted some medium sized sugar maples for future shade cover for our horses. Now am thinking we need to pull them out due to potential risks.

    Any opinions or experiences with other types of maples?

    Thanks!
    So, sorry for the TYPO!
    It is the wilted leaves in amounts that can be toxic. (leaves on a fallen tree limb lying in a pasture, not so much the leaves when they fall off on their own in the fall). I live in Ohio, we have maples everywhere. And our horses are NOT dropping like flies. It's a fact of life here for us. But I do make sure they have grass or hay and we blow the leaves out in the fall on a regular basis so they aren't tempted to start eating them. I will say that they don't normally eat the leaves by choice. They will occasionally chew on a tree and no issues there (thankfully we now have tree boxes).
    Last edited by ljcfoh; Apr. 17, 2012 at 09:30 PM. Reason: typo



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec. 14, 2007
    Location
    Wilsonville, Ontario, CANADA
    Posts
    4,246

    Default

    Truly - short of having no trees on your property or any neighbouring properties whose leaves might blow onto yours, how the heck do you control something like this???

    Our old farm had a beautiful maple tree lined driveway bordering the paddocks and hay fields. Im sure a bunch of dead leaves blew into all of them in the fall, every year

    We have hundreds of maple and black walnut trees bordering our paddocks and hay fields here. Chopping them all down would do nothing as the neighbours have a bunch too as does the rail line running up the side of our property

    Sometimes you just cant worry about the stuff you cannot control and thus far - has caused no ill effects to anyone or anything ...



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar. 26, 2006
    Posts
    26

    Default

    Thanks for your replies. Fortunately, the trees we just put in are relatively small, so if we want to make a change for long term safety, I feel we could do so now with minimal cost/effort. We do have some of control at this point. I wouldn't be concerned if they were outside the pasture/perimeter trees, but these are right inside pasture areas. There are similar maples on the perimeter of our property.



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul. 2, 2005
    Posts
    1,616

    Default

    For 50 years we have had two maples in one of the fields. They aren't sugar maples, and while they turn red in the fall, and have redish stems with green leaves in the spring, they are not the brilliant yellow in the fall that some maples are. They could be hybrids which I read are not toxic. Anyway, while I take the horses out of this field once the leaves start falling, they still blow into other fields and they are not consumed and haven't hurt anyone.

    In the other field, for 50 years, are a row of silver maples. The horses stay in here cause it is my sacrifice field, but they don't seem to eat them and don't get sick from them.
    ********
    There is no snooze button on a cat that wants breakfast.



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul. 6, 2005
    Posts
    256

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by mstraebel View Post
    Thanks for your replies. Fortunately, the trees we just put in are relatively small, so if we want to make a change for long term safety, I feel we could do so now with minimal cost/effort. We do have some of control at this point. I wouldn't be concerned if they were outside the pasture/perimeter trees, but these are right inside pasture areas. There are similar maples on the perimeter of our property.
    Regardless of whether you think they are dangerous, I will say your horses will likely chew those trees to death before they ever have a chance to drop any leaves/limbs -- unless they can't get direct access to them. Horses are like a magnet for trees...unless the pasture is so large.



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar. 26, 2006
    Posts
    26

    Default

    Yes, the chewing! We are planning on some sort of fencing around for protection.

    Bank of Dad--I will have to try and figure out what kind of maples you have based on your description. Any tree experts out there?



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