The Chronicle of the Horse
MagazineNewsHorse SportsHorse CareCOTH StoreVoicesThe Chronicle UntackedDirectoriesMarketplaceDates & Results
 
Results 1 to 8 of 8
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec. 8, 2007
    Location
    Louisiana
    Posts
    707

    Question Jumping Up a Bank - Tips Please

    I need a little help here (please). For some reason, I seem to have a hard time finding "a distance" or "spot" when jumping up a bank. I always seem to pick to the base, which causes my obedient guy to land in a heap on top. Now, normally, this is not a problem, but if there is a one stride at the top we (the royal "we") have to make a huge effort, etc.

    Just give a little context here, we are very solid at training level (multiple 1st placings on dressage scores, etc.) and moving up to prelim this summer. This is not a serious problem but an issue I'd like to deal with so I can stop worrying about it (I've been known to be a bit anal and over thinking in my riding ).

    Anybody have any good tips about where to look, how to ride up to the bank, what kind of impulsion I need, etc.? Again, we are a solid pair and I'm just trying to fine tune things but since I don't ride with a trainer or even with any regular instruction I thought I'd reach out for some insight. TIA



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan. 22, 2008
    Posts
    136

    Default

    Jump it like you jump a vertical in stadium. Eyes on the top of the bank, hocks under, front end up, bouncy canter.



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb. 3, 2000
    Location
    Nokesville, VA
    Posts
    35,040

    Default

    You need to jump it with the same impulsion as if it were a vertical at least a foot taller than the bank.

    The horse needs to get its body high enough that it can straighten its legs at the top.

    That is higher than a vertical where the horse only needs to get its body high enough to clear it with folded legs.
    Janet

    chief feeder and mucker for Music, Spy, Belle and Tiara. Someone else is now feeding and mucking for Chief and Brain (both foxhunting now).



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec. 4, 2010
    Posts
    291

    Default

    Echo what the two above posters have said, and add that you need to keep your body up and light. Lots of people tend to lean forward too far in anticipation of the bank and in an effort to stay with the horse, throwing their weight onto the horse's front end and increasing their workload. Not only does this make it hard for the horse to jump, but it encourages a chip and a loss of impulsion. Stay light and tall in the saddle to free up your horse's front end to jump.



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep. 24, 2010
    Location
    Area 1, Connecticut
    Posts
    705

    Default

    Definitely agree with the others. I think people ride backwards into banks because they think that they need to get to the base, which they should, but they need to have their horse's hind ends up underneath them. You don't want speed, but you do want impulsion.
    Blog: http://movingonupeventing.blogspot.com/

    Don't believe the hype.



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec. 8, 2007
    Location
    Louisiana
    Posts
    707

    Default

    Just what I was looking for. Thanks, all.



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb. 20, 2009
    Posts
    78

    Default

    Ditto on all the above! It helps me to look at my landing spot and I tend not to get too focused then on the "base" of the bank.
    I also have a "coffin" like canter coming in.
    Remember that the horse needs to be allowed to jump up, so you do not need to make a huge move with your shoulders or "jump up his neck" in order to 'help' him jump up the bank. I see WAY TOO many people doing this, not to say that you do.
    I tell my students to think of 'standing up' in their galloping position and let the horse jump up to them. Very bouncy step so that your horse can jump up to the top of the bank. And if there is another jump after an up bank, again I see way too many people try to 'help' their horse and make a move for the jump from their upper body and not from their seat and leg.

    Happy jumping!



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Apr. 13, 2005
    Posts
    3,823

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by southerneventgirl View Post
    I tell my students to think of 'standing up' in their galloping position and let the horse jump up to them.)
    This is how I was taught to approach a bank. The best part is, if you have a good canter/gallop, and adjust your position to 'standing' - you get this majikal canter full of impulsion. Ditto the looking at the top of the bank.

    Make sure your horse has straight shoulders to this jump, and you are not doing anything to distract with your hands. Give him/her the best possible chance to see the jump, and allow them to figure it out a bit on their own. Like all jumping, establish your pace, keep the canter, and execute your lines --then the distance will come. Much easier said than done A bit of a rewind for you, but perhaps lunge him up a bank (or another jump if a bank isn't readily accessible), see how he adjusts himself to it. An interesting study of your mounts personality, if anything.



Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •