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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb. 23, 2005
    Location
    Spotsylvania, VA
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    13,580

    Exclamation copperhead in my storage barn

    We're having fence work done on the farm and one of the workers said he saw a large copperhead in my storage barn. It slithered under the pallets where I store my hay. People can be careful but I'm worried about my barn cat and my dogs.

    Is there any way to encourage it to relocate?
    I wasn't always a Smurf
    Penmerryl's Sophie RIDSH
    "I ain't as good as I once was but I'm as good once as I ever was"
    The ignore list is my friend. It takes 2 to argue.



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul. 13, 2011
    Location
    East Longmeadow, MA
    Posts
    3,551

    Default

    How about SSS?
    What's wrong with you?? Your cheese done slid off its cracker?!?!



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan. 4, 2007
    Location
    TX
    Posts
    42,524

    Default

    Throw some mothballs under there.

    Or buy the commercial product, "Snake Away", made out of naphtha, the ingredient in mothballs and sprinkle it all around and under there.
    Feed stores sell it around here.



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb. 23, 2005
    Location
    Spotsylvania, VA
    Posts
    13,580

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Bluey View Post
    Throw some mothballs under there.

    Or buy the commercial product, "Snake Away", made out of naphtha, the ingredient in mothballs and sprinkle it all around and under there.
    Feed stores sell it around here.
    Thanks for that info. Is it safe around cats and hay?
    I wasn't always a Smurf
    Penmerryl's Sophie RIDSH
    "I ain't as good as I once was but I'm as good once as I ever was"
    The ignore list is my friend. It takes 2 to argue.



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov. 24, 2006
    Posts
    1,240

    Default

    Don't necessarily believe it was a copperhead until you see it. SOOOOO many people confuse copperheads with other snakes...they don't get very large, so if it was a BIG snake, I'd doubt it. I know around here, anything coppery/brown colored, everyone screams copperhead-but 90% of the time it's something harmless.
    Dusk is when you have the best time of trying to find it-with a nice sharp shovel or some birdshot.
    We lived somewhere that was innundated with copperheads coming off the rocky ridge behind the house. I'm talking, killed five or six ON THE PORCH every year. Nothing stopped them for us. If there's a food source, they're there! And non-poisonous snakes don't keep them away either lol- we saw a copperhead sunning itself on our woodpile a foot away from a big ole blacksnake......
    Hate copperheads.
    Kerri



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec. 25, 2006
    Location
    Overland, MO
    Posts
    1,403

    Default

    Copperheads are big as in fat --- short and fat. A shovel is a good idea, but if you don't want to kill it, go for the mothballs. A poisonous snake in a living area is just not a good thing. (Heck, I'm so afraid of snakes that even a little old harmless garter snake gives me a heart attack, so I don't even want them around!)



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar. 14, 2007
    Posts
    2,314

    Default

    jeeze, Carol be careful and good luck!!
    i'm a Virginia girl born n raised, know them well and HATE em!
    I wonder about the mthballs/hay etc solution too? can't see my guy diving inyo a flake of hay reeking of mothballs............

    not to mention. personally I would have to know the suker was dead ( not just 'relocated' under something nearby) and that no little ones remained--------

    KasJ: I know what your point is in re: many people are mistaken in identifying them but in this case? I think it is MUCH more safe for her to assume it is a copperhead for now as far as precautions and remedies vs assuming it is not
    ayrabz
    "Indecision may or may not be my problem"
    --Jimmy Buffett



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb. 23, 2005
    Location
    Spotsylvania, VA
    Posts
    13,580

    Default

    Thanks y'all. I will be getting some Snake Away today. My hay barn is almost empty waiting for the new cutting....PLEASE RAIN....so I will pick up the pallets very carefully clean out underneath them and add the Snake Away. He's probably in there for the mice and I suspect if I kill him another will take his place. If it hasn't already
    I wasn't always a Smurf
    Penmerryl's Sophie RIDSH
    "I ain't as good as I once was but I'm as good once as I ever was"
    The ignore list is my friend. It takes 2 to argue.



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan. 5, 2010
    Posts
    2,152

    Default

    Cats are usually pretty good about driving away snakes. Without going into the full story, a military base my stepdad worked at a few decades ago cleared out a rescue of cats to deal with a rattlesnake problem. The snakes were gone virtually overnight, then they were stuck feeding the cats :=)

    Cats reflexes are faster than a snakes reflexes. They'll just sit there and bat the head away until they get bored and then either the snake leaves or they eat the snake.
    Nudging "Almost Heaven" a little closer still...
    http://www.wvhorsetrainer.com



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jun. 11, 2003
    Location
    Dickerson, MD 20842
    Posts
    395

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    A friends dog tangled with a copperhead and it was touch and go for a while. Dog did live. Snake got the dog on the face. I don't mind snakes in general but copperhead's, they got to go. Snakes with a bad attitude and venom to back it up are not a good combination. Stay safe.



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Oct. 18, 2000
    Posts
    22,447

    Default

    Carol, if I had a dollar for every time a harmless snake was called a copperhead..... I'd be wealthy indeed.

    It is far more likely it is NOT a copperhead but one of many harmless snakes that are native to Virginia.

    It's wise to be careful until you know for sure. Even a rat snake will bite when provoked. But I expect you know that already.

    If you are not 100% sure how to identify the snake, VDGIF publishes a fantastic little handbook that makes it super easy to identify our native snakes.

    I've had folks insist that the brown snake near my pond is a copperhead. Or a water moccasin. Nope. It's a Northern Watersnake.

    Anyway, if you are interested in that handbook search the site or holler I'll help you obtain one.

    As Bluey noted mothballs work wonders though they are toxic.

    Here is a link that may help you identify the snake as a copperhead or one of Virginia's several look a like species. http://www.virginiaherpetologicalsoc...copperhead.asp
    Brothers and sisters, I bid you beware
    Of giving your heart to a dog to tear.
    -Rudyard Kipling



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Apr. 23, 1999
    Location
    Rosehill, TX
    Posts
    7,072

    Default

    copperhead
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/5144157...in/photostream
    close up of tail
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/5144157...in/photostream
    size comparison
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/5144157...in/photostream

    this snake was confirmed by 2Jakes to be the real deal

    he was very intent on being 'invisible' - did not react at all to my proximity or photos/flash -- they are not the type to 'go after you' but you don't want to step on one

    my cats have killed several over the course of many years
    Nothing says "I love you" like a tractor. (Clydejumper)

    The reports states, “Elizabeth reported that she accidently put down this pony, ........, at the show.”



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Nov. 24, 2006
    Posts
    1,240

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by SGray View Post
    copperhead
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/5144157...in/photostream
    close up of tail
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/5144157...in/photostream
    size comparison
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/5144157...in/photostream

    this snake was confirmed by 2Jakes to be the real deal

    he was very intent on being 'invisible' - did not react at all to my proximity or photos/flash -- they are not the type to 'go after you' but you don't want to step on one

    my cats have killed several over the course of many years
    Yep- look at that "arrowhead" that's the quickest way to tell on these guys , it's very pronounced. They can be much darker than "your" snake too...That isn't a very big snake, but for a copperhead- it's a large one!
    I've stepped over them already when they were right outside the porch door, they just stayed right where they were. I've also had my flashlight on one in the dark and it was only three feet from me and just stayed there until Mr.Shovel came to visit.
    My fat cat got bit by one between the eyes according to our vet. She had two pronounced little holes that only got a little swollen and infected but the poison somehow blew a hole out in her belly. (it was disGUSting, looked like you could fit your fist in it!) .they weren't sure if she got bit more than once but think it likely. They also said it was most likely either a young one or a dry bite- not much poison delivered. That was about 6 years ago and to this day if she sees something that resembles a snakelike form, she freezes then walks the other way lol.
    Have I mentioned I HATE copperheads.
    Kerri



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Feb. 23, 2005
    Location
    Spotsylvania, VA
    Posts
    13,580

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by JSwan View Post
    Carol, if I had a dollar for every time a harmless snake was called a copperhead..... I'd be wealthy indeed.

    It is far more likely it is NOT a copperhead but one of many harmless snakes that are native to Virginia.

    It's wise to be careful until you know for sure. Even a rat snake will bite when provoked. But I expect you know that already.

    If you are not 100% sure how to identify the snake, VDGIF publishes a fantastic little handbook that makes it super easy to identify our native snakes.

    I've had folks insist that the brown snake near my pond is a copperhead. Or a water moccasin. Nope. It's a Northern Watersnake.

    Anyway, if you are interested in that handbook search the site or holler I'll help you obtain one.

    As Bluey noted mothballs work wonders though they are toxic.

    Here is a link that may help you identify the snake as a copperhead or one of Virginia's several look a like species. http://www.virginiaherpetologicalsoc...copperhead.asp
    Yup in addition to snakes we have black widows so I try to avoid sticking my hands someplace where I can't see and wear gloves though fangs can go through gloves. I'm more worried about my barn cat and dogs, especially the dachshunds. They have an absence of caution.

    I was getting some goat hay out this morning and rushed against an empty feed bag which rustled. I must have jumped a couple of feet!
    I wasn't always a Smurf
    Penmerryl's Sophie RIDSH
    "I ain't as good as I once was but I'm as good once as I ever was"
    The ignore list is my friend. It takes 2 to argue.



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Oct. 18, 2000
    Posts
    22,447

    Default

    I know what you mean. I don't like to tip over the stock tanks because Black Widows like to hang out in the curved lip at the top.

    Moving hay is the worst - you never know what you're going to surprise.

    Hope it's a false alarm and you've got a nice ratsnake eating the mice.
    Brothers and sisters, I bid you beware
    Of giving your heart to a dog to tear.
    -Rudyard Kipling



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Jun. 5, 2006
    Posts
    172

    Exclamation Be careful with mothballs

    Quote Originally Posted by Bluey View Post
    Throw some mothballs under there.

    Or buy the commercial product, "Snake Away", made out of naphtha, the ingredient in mothballs and sprinkle it all around and under there.
    Feed stores sell it around here.
    Naphthalene - a chemical found in some brands of mothballs - is toxic to dogs, cats and other animals, and if ingested, can cause serious illness, including vomiting, diarrhea, abdominal pain, swelling of the brain tissue, seizures, damage to the liver, kidneys and blood cells, coma and even death.
    New Blessing Farm
    Standing the Oldenburg stallion Legaczy
    www.newblessingfarm.com
    "The greatest oak was once a little nut who held its ground".



  17. #17
    Join Date
    Feb. 23, 2005
    Location
    Spotsylvania, VA
    Posts
    13,580

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by NBFarm View Post
    Naphthalene - a chemical found in some brands of mothballs - is toxic to dogs, cats and other animals, and if ingested, can cause serious illness, including vomiting, diarrhea, abdominal pain, swelling of the brain tissue, seizures, damage to the liver, kidneys and blood cells, coma and even death.
    Yup, feed store warned against it because of the cat. So I'm just going to do the same as I do every spring, clean out underneath the pallets before I store the new hay.

    So far no sign of the snake
    I wasn't always a Smurf
    Penmerryl's Sophie RIDSH
    "I ain't as good as I once was but I'm as good once as I ever was"
    The ignore list is my friend. It takes 2 to argue.



  18. #18
    Join Date
    Mar. 6, 2009
    Posts
    8,828

    Default just saying ```` I HATE SNAKES !

    just saying ```` again ````

    I HATE SNAKES AND BUGS AND CREAM OF CELERY SOUP ~~~

    PLEASE BE CAREFUL !
    Zu Zu Bailey " IT"S A WONDERFUL LIFE !"



  19. #19
    Join Date
    Mar. 27, 2009
    Location
    Upstate NY
    Posts
    2,245

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Zu Zu View Post
    just saying ```` again ````

    I HATE SNAKES AND BUGS AND CREAM OF CELERY SOUP ~~~

    PLEASE BE CAREFUL !
    ZuZu, you're whacked!!
    Trainer's website - photos of my horse Airborne under About and Francesca Edwards also in media page 1

    http://www.patricianorciadressage.com/



  20. #20
    Join Date
    May. 5, 2008
    Location
    Glenelg, MD
    Posts
    666

    Default

    Snakes are such an important part of the ecosystem I do my best to let them be, but encourage them to find other places to 'be' around the farm. And, like other posters, I've been told certain snakes we've seen are copperheads/water moccasins, but are in fact northern watersnakes. Most of the incorrect identification seems to come from contractors who work outside all the time and should know better. Sigh.

    I was told that the best way to recognize a venomous snake is the shape of their pupils. Not that anyone wants to get that close, but venomous snakes have elliptical eyes (like cats) - the others (black, water, garter, etc.) have round eyes. Venomous snakes also have 'pits' near their nostrils. Again, I can't imagine anyone getting close enough to look, but it might be worth a quick glance before you dispatch what could be a helpful rodent eater to the great beyond.



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