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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar. 3, 2012
    Posts
    235

    Default How to find a horse to lease?

    This post is not meant to be seen as an ad. I have posted in the horseless rider section so please if you are interested in what I am looking for please visit my post

    So, back to my question. How do you find a horse to lease? I have looked on many advertising sites, craigs list, and ever Chronicle's very own ridelss horse section, with no luck.

    Soon I am going to be leaving Minnesota to go back to Maine to finish my schooling. Unfortuently leaving Minnesota also means leaving behind my great lessons I am getting once a week, and the oppertunity I have to ride multiple times during the week to work on things I learned during my lesson.

    I am going to be taking lessons geared towards eventing this summer, which is great and I am excited about that, but I am devestated because I know riding once a week just will not suffice for me. I do not own my own horse, nor do I have the means to buy my own, being a college student and all.

    Once I develop a relationship with my next trainer I plan on telling her about my interested in leasing. In the perfect world I would love to free lease, or lease a horse for under $100 a month, again I am a college student so I don't have a ton of money to just spend anywhere.

    So where should I look next?

    Thank you
    http://www.horsez-r-us.blogspot.com
    Blog of an ordinary and every day horse lover!



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan. 19, 2011
    Location
    Coastal Marsh of Texas
    Posts
    1,086

    Default

    Fall in love with a sport, find a good trainer in that sport, and the horse will FIND you!



  3. #3
    Join Date
    May. 6, 2003
    Posts
    1,888

    Default

    Generally you find them through trainers or stables. I have one for lease (but not in your area or price range), but you wouldn't find him in any of the places you mentioned -- he's word of mouth only. I have seen lease ads up in tack shops, though, so that might be somewhere to look.
    According to the Mayan calendar, the world will not end this week. Please plan your life accordingly.



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar. 3, 2012
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    235

    Default

    I do plan on e mailing my old trainer and seeing if I can muck a few stalls a week in exchange for me to ride. My old trainer doesn't have horses that can really event but I figure more time in the saddle is better than nothing.
    http://www.horsez-r-us.blogspot.com
    Blog of an ordinary and every day horse lover!



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr. 8, 2005
    Location
    Kentucky
    Posts
    4,580

    Default

    I've got several that could use work. You could ride every day if you wanted if you are a pretty good rider and you lived nearby. But the only way you'd know that is if you knew me. Network. Tell people that you're looking for a horse to ride/lease. Eventually you'll run into somebody that has too many horses and not enough time.

    BTW, a "free lease" usually isn't free. It generally involves paying for board and/or training, there's no charge for the actual use of the horse. I have a show horse I would love to "free lease" to the right situation, but it would entail the payment of board and training (along with farrier/routine vet/show fees) with trainer I approved of.



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar. 3, 2012
    Posts
    235

    Default

    Oh I gotcha! Are in barn leases usually more expensive?

    I will be able to talk to my trainer once I am actually back in Maine. I am also thinking about talking to my old trainer to see if I can lease one of the horses I use to ride in exchange for me doing stalls a couple times a week.
    http://www.horsez-r-us.blogspot.com
    Blog of an ordinary and every day horse lover!



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov. 18, 2004
    Location
    Catonsville, MD
    Posts
    6,966

    Default

    I found my first lease, who was perfect for me and introduced me to a good barn and a great bunch of folks, by placing an ad in the local horse paper:

    "Responsible adult novice rider seeks quiet and suitable half lease within 30 miles of Baltimore, preferably boarded someplace w/ an indoor arena."

    I got a number of answers, went out and tried 1 horse, really liked him and the barn, and I rode him for a year, and made many friends and connections who are my horse peeps to this day.

    I think this can really help if you are trying to make connections someplace you don't know anyone.
    I tolerate all kinds of animal idiosyncrasies.
    I've found that I don't tolerate people idiosyncrasies as well. - Casey09




  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan. 19, 2011
    Location
    Coastal Marsh of Texas
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    Default

    That was a great idea Lori B.



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar. 3, 2012
    Posts
    235

    Default

    Thank you everyone for all the tips!! I have found a place that I am going to visit when I go home in May. They have a range of horses to try. Their lease is usually $175-200 but they are willing to lower it to $100 in exchange for a couple days of work. of course this will all be ironed out when I meet this lady and if she has a suitable horse for me.

    I guess my next question what should I expect? I've never leased a horse or bought or horse so I think I have an idea of what to expect but can I get some experiences from the experienced?
    http://www.horsez-r-us.blogspot.com
    Blog of an ordinary and every day horse lover!



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Nov. 18, 2004
    Location
    Catonsville, MD
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    A written agreement is best; in a half lease situation, it can be short and simple. You don't need a lawyer or anything. I also recommend that half leases work best month to month. It should include addressing who pays for shoes, who pays for showing (if showing is going to be part of the agreement), and basic vet expenses, and responsibility for big vet expenses (colic, etc.). I always made a point of being very conscientious about grooming the horse, doing whatever care the owner wanted (putting keratex on hooves, how tack should be fitted and used, etc. Keep your horse's tack clean, wash the saddle pads you use, and most important -- keep the owner up to date on what's going on with the horse. If you do these things, you will have a good relationship with your owner. My good experience half-leasing lead to other opportunities to ride, and having a good relationship w/ my owner was a big part of that.
    I tolerate all kinds of animal idiosyncrasies.
    I've found that I don't tolerate people idiosyncrasies as well. - Casey09




  11. #11
    Join Date
    Mar. 3, 2012
    Posts
    235

    Default

    Lori B, yet again another wonderful reply thank you! From the sounds of it, the lease will just be $100 a month at the beginning of the month. Is that normal, should I be worried?

    I am super responsible with horse care (you should see me with the six horses I work with, can you say OCD?) I take care of tack and everything better than I would take care of my own. I am also very good a communicating with health issues and even like to give updates about my rides (at least with my current trainer when I am allowed to ride on my own). The owner of the barn says that she is home often and due to liability wants riders to only ride when she is home (which I think is a very good idea).
    http://www.horsez-r-us.blogspot.com
    Blog of an ordinary and every day horse lover!



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jan. 16, 2003
    Location
    Tennessee
    Posts
    3,240

    Default

    Make sure the agreement is very clear on what you have to pay for, and what they horse owner pays for. You need to ask about cost of monthly board, vet, farrier, supplements, etc. Also find out if you have to provide tack for the horse. When I free half-leased my pony, I wanted the person leasing him to use my saddle and bridle because I knew they fit correctly. The lease agreement should spell everything out. When in doubt, ask. Good luck, and I hope you find a horse to enjoy.
    It's 2015. Do you know where your old horse is?



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Dec. 7, 2010
    Posts
    439

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by SanJacMonument View Post
    Fall in love with a sport, find a good trainer in that sport, and the horse will FIND you!
    this exactly! The good ones will come to you.
    Don't squat with yer spurs on

    "The world is best viewed through the ears of a horse."



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Apr. 4, 2010
    Location
    yonder a bit, GA
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    Default

    If it's a partial lease, discuss and agree on which days you will be assigned. If the owner still rides, or if the horse is being used in lessons or by other people, have it worked out for what days are yours, and what to do in the instance of a conflict of scheduling- say, if you have to work or can't make it on your normal day that week, can you ride at a different time? If so, how much notice needs to be given?

    If you'll be working in part to lower the lease fee, get it ironed out about the details of what barn chores exactly you'll be doing. Instead of just, "mucking and feeding" spell it out, "cleaning/picking/stripping X stalls, feeding and watering Y horses, and am/pm shift." It'll be summer, but blankets/fly masks/spray, even turning in and out should be discussed, just so you know the expected work load and how long it may take you (and if 75 dollars is enough of a discount).

    And ditto to the vet bills, farrier costs, etc. Get that all figured out, in writing, in advance. Usually the leases i've known have had a monthly cap on the max vet bills the person leasing (lessee) is responsible for.
    Last edited by bits619; Apr. 17, 2012 at 05:35 PM. Reason: Word mix up. lessor, lessee, oh my, oh me!



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Jun. 14, 2010
    Location
    O'Canada
    Posts
    118

    Default

    I'm half-leasing a horse from my instructor and it's fantastic! I pay half the board, ride 3-4 days a week, and am not responsible for any shoeing or vet costs. Any clinics or shows I attend are at my expense. I don't have a written agreement and go month to month on my lease so either of us can walk away at any point. This works well since the horse is for sale. Check with local barns, talk to horse people, and put up little ads on bulletin boards at feed stores, barns, and shows.

    I've found a free "lease" by posting an ad on Kijiji and simply stating I was a poor college student looking to ride and wanted to exchange labour for riding. I was contacted by a nice lady who lived alone on a farm and had horses just sitting in a field. I helped her by house-sitting when she was working/away, pet-sitting her numerous farm animals, and kept her horses in shape. I got to ride all I wanted and made a great friend!



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Mar. 3, 2012
    Posts
    235

    Default

    Oh thanks everyone I guess it is hard to find a place to lease a horse when I'm not home yet.

    I told my mom about the lease and she didn't sound too enthused about it. She loves that I'm riding, but I want to be a vet so savings is a big priority. But she does realize how much riding means to me.
    http://www.horsez-r-us.blogspot.com
    Blog of an ordinary and every day horse lover!



  17. #17
    Join Date
    Nov. 18, 2004
    Location
    Catonsville, MD
    Posts
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    Default

    There's really no more affordable way to have horses in your life than half-leasing. Don't worry about getting your mom on board, once she sees how it works, she'll be fine with it. The fact that you are protected from major medical vet bills (which she more than likely doesn't get) is particularly great.
    I tolerate all kinds of animal idiosyncrasies.
    I've found that I don't tolerate people idiosyncrasies as well. - Casey09




  18. #18
    Join Date
    Mar. 3, 2012
    Posts
    235

    Default

    Exactly. I think I just threw a lot at her at once. When I can get home I can sit down with her and actually talk to her better about it. I think she is just more worried about the money I will be spending. But I don't know how many hours a week I will be working yet so once I figure that out I can really decide if this is something I can do.
    http://www.horsez-r-us.blogspot.com
    Blog of an ordinary and every day horse lover!



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