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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov. 15, 2005
    Location
    Midwest
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    607

    Default Why oh why?????

    Could someone please tell me why there is always an annoying marker or cone or big plastic thing placed at A in the competition dressage rings? Most of the time the marker is about 10 feet beyond the ring border but always right on the center line. I've tried leg yielding around it, cutting inside, going wide, going straight and getting so close to the marker my horse invariably spooks.....all resulting in crap rides down the center line. Why the heck does the marker even need to be there...or why can't it waaay beyond the entrance? Please don't think I'm bitter



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov. 24, 2002
    Location
    Northern KY
    Posts
    4,481

    Default Oh for heaven's sake

    Get a lawn chair. Put stupid, spooky things on it and practice at home for heaven's sake. It's just not that hard.

    It's always there, everyone else has to ride around it so it's a level playing field.

    Practice your turns. At Home. Really.

    Trust me when I tell you, where they put those markers is usually the last thing I worry about.



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul. 19, 2003
    Location
    Middleburg, VA
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    13,319

    Default

    Somebody needs to practice their turns!!!

    Depending on the set up of the area around my ring, I move out on the long side some amount, straighten my horse just a bit to get him on the outside aids, and turn INSIDE the marker, so that if I miss a little, I can move out to it (leg yield) rather than have to go back in to it.

    Just takes a little practice and thought. It shouldn't be too much harder than riding up the center line at the end.



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb. 14, 2001
    Location
    Lexington, KY--GO BIG BLUE!!
    Posts
    3,323

    Default

    It's there because it has to mark A. You can't mark A a few feet to the left, or right! I agree, it's a bit awkward to turn down centerline when entering the arena, but that's only one movement and everybody has to deal with it.

    How do you 20m circle at A, when A isn't centered? How do you halt, or walk, at A if it's not on centerline? It is there for a reason...and not just to get in the way.
    “A clever person solves a problem. A wise person avoids it.”
    ? Albert Einstein

    ~AJ~



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov. 15, 2005
    Location
    Midwest
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    607

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by yellowbritches View Post
    Somebody needs to practice their turns!!!

    Depending on the set up of the area around my ring, I move out on the long side some amount, straighten my horse just a bit to get him on the outside aids, and turn INSIDE the marker, so that if I miss a little, I can move out to it (leg yield) rather than have to go back in to it.

    Just takes a little practice and thought. It shouldn't be too much harder than riding up the center line at the end.
    You are all right! I do need turn practice.....but I am always looking for an easier softer way. I was just hoping I could change the way rings are set up across the whole wide world of eventing in order for little ol' me to have a better ride! Is that so wrong?

    Like this idea YB! The inside turn makes most sense.



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun. 1, 2002
    Location
    Indiana
    Posts
    11,447

    Default

    I agree, it's always in the freaking way! My turns down centerline are awkward enough, to top it off I have to navigate around the stupid cone.



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul. 19, 2003
    Location
    Middleburg, VA
    Posts
    13,319

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Gryhrs View Post
    You are all right! I do need turn practice.....but I am always looking for an easier softer way. I was just hoping I could change the way rings are set up across the whole wide world of eventing in order for little ol' me to have a better ride! Is that so wrong?

    Like this idea YB! The inside turn makes most sense.
    Of course, this easier said than done...I'm also riding a very broke horse who is a total professional about the dressage ring! Now, when I'm riding greenbeans, I would be right there lamenting the placement of the letters (and the horse eating judge's box!) with you!



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Apr. 15, 2003
    Location
    Northeast MA
    Posts
    4,074

    Default

    Short answer to your question: so the judge can accurately see the center line A to C.

    In addition to the inside turn (similar to what you're actually going to have to do at the end of the test as well), you can skim the edge of the marker on a trajectory as near as possible to the straight line A to C and in the 10 feet before the ring starts just leg yield over to center line the one or two steps necessary. Depends on your horse which works better.

    But if we're going to talk about rules we want changed to suit our horses, well, I've got a looooong list!
    They don't call me frugal for nothing.
    Proud and achy member of the Eventing Grannies clique.



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Sep. 29, 2011
    Location
    Sacramento Valley,Ca
    Posts
    37

    Default if it helps to think of A as..

    practice for your first turn off centerline. I was taught to turn inside A the same direction my first turn was at C. This sets your horse up for an outside supportiing rein to be connected to the whole trip up centerline, thru the halt and into the next turn. I was also taught by this same coach to put my bridle # on the side facing the scribe/judge during that first turn at C.
    So if you enter at A, halt at X and track left at C then you would come to A from the left, and your # would be on your horse's right ear/browband! Its a pretty simple way to keep your horse connected, focused on one thing at a time and have the first impression to the judge be that this is not your first trip in the white rectangle!!!! It also helps the rider to just keep track of the first 3 things in the test..entrance,halt,which way to turn...deep breath,rest of the test!



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Mar. 7, 2004
    Location
    New Zealand
    Posts
    1,187

    Default

    I have been the first to ride tests where the judge hadn't noticed that a) the marker was right in the gate way so I couldn't get in or b) when the marker was beside the gate. On those occasions I usually ask the judge to move the marker (politely and with a smile). It usually happens when a novice or non horsey crew has put the arena up.



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Sep. 23, 2003
    Location
    NC
    Posts
    1,180

    Default

    Funny you should post this, actually. We came so close to the metal "A" marker at a schooling show today that Moose kicked sand footing onto it and did a mini-spook at the sound.
    "Why would anybody come here if they had a pony? Who leaves a country packed with ponies to come to a non-pony country? It doesn't make sense!"



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Nov. 15, 2005
    Location
    Midwest
    Posts
    607

    Default

    Been there Scaramouch !! Once while stadium jumping my horse jumped the cone used for the start flags and prompted spooked when the sand hit it. Rider error once again. OMG I really do suck!

    YellowB - I wish I had the green bean excuse....BUT I DON'T!

    I have never heard the bridle number tip before Ownedbyhim. Makes sense. A friend of mine sent me the rules below which I honestly did not know existed. Here they are:


    EV135 Dressage Arena.
    1. The arena must be 60 meters long and 20 meters wide (Standard Arena) or 40 meters long and 20 meters wide (Small Arena), depending on the specifications for the test to be used. The measurements are for the interior of the enclosure. The arena should be separated from the public by a distance of not less than 15 meters. The enclosure itself should consist of a low fence, about 30 cm (12 inches) high. It is recommended that the entrance at A be a minimum
    of 2 meters and a maximum of 4 meters wide. The part of the fence at A should be easy to remove, to allow access, or may be left open. The fence should be such to prevent the horse’s hooves from entering.
    2. The letters should be placed outside the enclosure, about 50 cm (20 inches) from the fence. The letter A should be a sufficient distance from the entrance to allow unobstructed entry. It is
    desirable to place a special marker on the fence itself, level with and in addition to the letter concerned.
    3. The center line and the points along the center line, if described in the test to be used, should be clearly marked, without being of a nature to frighten the horses. On that account, it is recommended: to mow the center line shorter on a grass arena, or to roll or rake the center line on a sand arena. The points D, L, X, I and G, should be similarly mowed, rolled or raked, about 2
    meters (6’6”) straight across the center line.
    4. If there is only one judge, he is placed 5 meters (16 feet) from the end of the arena opposite the letter C. When two judges are used, one (the President) is placed at C and the other is placed 5 meters from the side of the arena, opposite the letter E or B. When three judges are used, one (the President) is placed at C, another (M or H) is placed at the end of the arena on
    a line with the judge at C, to his left or right, 2.5 meters in from the long side of the arena, and the third judge is placed 5 meters from the side of the arena, opposite either E or B. A separate enclosure (tent, trailer) should be provided for each judge and it should be raised at least 0.5 meters (20 inches) above the ground to give the judge a good view of the arena.
    5. For diagrams of Standard and Small Arenas. See Appendix 5.



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jan. 16, 2002
    Location
    West Coast of Michigan
    Posts
    36,321

    Default

    It gives the judge a reference point to see if the horse is straight down center line. Sort of like aiming a rifle--you have to line up the sights and that means two points on a line.

    I always approach very slightly from the side of the marker in a bit of shoulder-fore or even leg yield past the letter A so as I enter we are on center line and need to only make a slight adjustment to be straight. In theory, at least.
    Click here before you buy.



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Apr. 30, 2002
    Location
    Looking up
    Posts
    6,275

    Default

    Pay no attention to it. Ride over top of it like I do.
    "Passion, though a bad regulator, is a powerful spring." -- Emerson
    www.eventhorse.wordpress.com



  15. #15
    Join Date
    May. 23, 2007
    Location
    Southern Indiana
    Posts
    2,546

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by retreadeventer View Post
    Pay no attention to it. Ride over top of it like I do.
    Now, THAT'S an Eventer!



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Apr. 2, 2009
    Location
    North Carolina
    Posts
    5,408

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by retreadeventer View Post
    Pay no attention to it. Ride over top of it like I do.
    Excellent. I hate that it's there too. I understand WHY it's there, but that doesn't make it any less bloody annoying. Can't they make it a crossrail where the center of the X is A, then you can just hop over and have a nice canter in?



  17. #17
    Join Date
    Jan. 13, 2010
    Posts
    244

    Default

    Haha! Yes, agreed w retread and wildlifer. I understand why it's there also, but my initial centerline is always a bust.

    Yes, that's my fault but sooooo much easier to blame the marker!



  18. #18
    Join Date
    Aug. 15, 2008
    Posts
    4,589

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by retreadeventer View Post
    Pay no attention to it. Ride over top of it like I do.
    Over, under or through. Wait, wrong phase...
    "Aye God, Woodrow..."



  19. #19
    Join Date
    Nov. 15, 2005
    Location
    Midwest
    Posts
    607

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by HeyJealousy View Post
    Yes, that's my fault but sooooo much easier to blame the marker!
    Exactly

    Quote Originally Posted by retreadeventer View Post
    Pay no attention to it. Ride over top of it like I do.
    Done!



  20. #20
    Join Date
    May. 26, 2011
    Posts
    1,340

    Default

    I agree with the positioning of the "A" One thing I don't understand is the positioning of smaller rings in larger rings. For example, at a recent event at Morven. From the fence around the large ring to the edge of the dressage ring couldn't have been more than 10'. However, at the other end where the judge was parked you could have parked a school bus. So why not shift the ring down a little bit.

    That way those of us with "A" problems would have more room to negotiate that land mine.



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