The Chronicle of the Horse
MagazineNewsHorse SportsHorse CareCOTH StoreVoicesThe Chronicle UntackedDirectoriesMarketplaceDates & Results
 
Results 1 to 17 of 17
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr. 1, 2011
    Posts
    770

    Default What to do when a horse is cast

    Tonight I had a scary experience while at the barn. As I was coming in from a ride I heard loud kicking and discovered another boarder's horse cast in his stall. He was wedged in a corner in what looked a very painful position because as he kicked the wall, he pushed his head against the other wall. I called the BO right away and he headed down to the barn. However, before he got there, the horse was able to kick away from the wall and get himself up. Thankfully he seemed okay, but I'm sure he's very sore around his neck.

    I've never witnessed a cast horse before and for those few minutes I felt terrified and helpless. What do you do for a cast horse?



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct. 20, 2006
    Posts
    926

    Default

    The few cast horses that I've dealt with were very similar to each other with stuck heads and legs.

    Both times, I've grabbed another person and several lead ropes to help pull a horse back far enough from the wall. They always got up after that.



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov. 28, 2008
    Location
    Lexington, KY
    Posts
    203

    Default

    Carefully loop a long lead rope around a leg and flip him over. Or you can sometimes pull them by the halter or tail to get them away from the wall. Just be careful not to get yourself in a bad spot.



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep. 27, 2000
    Location
    Southern California - on a freeway someplace
    Posts
    10,037

    Default

    When you flip them over, do it by looping a lunge line over the leg closer to the ground.
    The Evil Chem Prof



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep. 13, 2002
    Location
    Pacific Northwest
    Posts
    5,344

    Default

    I asked a similar question here, with good responses. COTH Thread How To Get Cast Horse Up



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr. 1, 2011
    Location
    British Columbia, Canada
    Posts
    734

    Default

    What others have mentioned.. loop a leadrope around a couple of their legs and pull them away from the wall. My mare cast the other day after my sister turned her in for dinner, but by the time I got down to the barn (less than 60 seconds) she had freed herself.. they usually do!



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun. 21, 2004
    Location
    Cairo, Georgia
    Posts
    2,453

    Default

    And important to watch the horse carefully to see why he was cast. Could have just been a freak thing but could be the beginnings of colic or generalized illness or soreness. I never sleep well after that happens.
    Producing horses with gentle minds & brilliant movement!
    www.whitfieldfarm.shutterfly.com



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec. 20, 2010
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    669

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Peggy View Post
    When you flip them over, do it by looping a lunge line over the leg closer to the ground.
    This It is very scary to watch, but sometimes the best thing to do is just watch. Horses generally get themselves out of it without assistance.



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jul. 23, 2003
    Location
    itty bitty town, GA
    Posts
    3,004

    Default

    Sometimes they can get out of it, but I've also had several horses cast that could not get themselves out of it without assistance. Two weekends ago at a show, a very big show horse got cast (the stalls were only 10 X 10 at this show). The horse struggled and was beating his head against a wall. I yelled for someone to help and grooms came running. The grooms were able to get him out of the corner with ropes, but first they had to get him calm and that took a bit of time.

    You do not want to let them struggle too long as they can really do some damage to themselves, especially if they panic.
    Susan N.

    Don't get confused between my personality & my attitude. My personality is who I am, my attitude depends on who you are.



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Aug. 8, 2001
    Location
    up the hill from the little river (that floods alarmingly often)
    Posts
    3,626

    Default

    The one cast horse I've helped get up again was cast against the back wall of his stall, with his haunches directly across from the stall door (his head was wedged in the corner diagonally across from the door).

    He had gotten himself wedged in there good; he didn't have enough room between his body and the wall to straighten out his legs, so it was harder for us to get leadlines around them to flip him over. I was a little about looping that leadline around his back leg though ... I didn't know the horse at all and was just praying he'd be sensible.

    Trainer was at front end, I had the back end. She told me to pull just hard enough to start him over and then to scoot backward out the stall door.

    Thankfully he was a quiet youngster and just lay there waiting for us to do something. We got him rolled, and he got up quickly but not in a panic.

    IIRC he didn't seem to have any issues from being cast, but I believe he was diagnosed with EPM not long after that.

    I'll be quite happy if I never have to right a cast horse again.
    Full-time bargain hunter.



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Mar. 8, 2004
    Location
    Baltimore, MD
    Posts
    21,018

    Default

    There are no hard and fast rules as it depends how the horse is situated. Sometimes flipping them over is the only way, other times you can just pull either their front end or back end away from the wall depending upon which end is more stuck.



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Dec. 2, 2010
    Location
    minnesota
    Posts
    160

    Default

    I have a mare who got cast up against the hay feeder this winter hay feeder isnt moveable. Found her down when i went out to take my daughter down the driveway to get the school bus. I had to call my hubby and have him come home i wasnt strong enough to pull her over. We took ropes and put them around her legs closest to the ground and pulled her over.She jumped right up but was very wobbly and shakey. We figured she had been down close to 4 hours had stuggled to get free but couldnt. Was also pretty cut up on her legs and one eye was swollen almost shut. Thank goodness it wasnt 20 below zero i know that out come wouldnt of been good. Shes 25 years old so youth isnt on her side.

    After that i had many nights id go out to check on her i was getting up every two hours just couldnt sleep. Took me a long time to finally get to were i wasnt always checking on her all the time. She has gotten smart and now doesnt lay down next to hay feeder think she scared herself a bit.Shes a wise old lady and i just love her alot shes my heart horse.



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Mar. 6, 2009
    Posts
    9,153

    Cool Don't Forget to Call for Help if YOU NEED HELP ~ Fire Department ~

    Don't forget to call for 'help' if you need aid in a horse 'cast' situation ```

    The local fire department will be able to assist you and your horse .... just explain the 'process' and they will be your friends

    And of course send a 'thank you note' and some tasty treat afterwards ...
    Zu Zu Bailey " IT"S A WONDERFUL LIFE !"



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Dec. 18, 2008
    Location
    SE, PA
    Posts
    1,080

    Default

    DD's hony got himself cast with hind end wedged against the stall door and head wedged up behind him against the other wall. I had to scale the stall door and jump down next to him. We have a 4-5" opening under the stall door and he had one leg through kicking into the isle. DD's bf pushed his foot back under the door - I grabbed and pulled. Once he had a bit of momentum he freed himself while I huddled in the corner!!

    Both of us made it out without a scrape!
    Last edited by MoonWitch; Apr. 17, 2012 at 09:05 AM. Reason: he's a hony - not a honey :)
    Our horses know our secrets; we braid our tears into their manes and whisper our hopes into their ears.



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Mar. 24, 2010
    Location
    Tucson
    Posts
    6,973

    Default

    One of the most important steps: Ensure the owner is notified afterward, whether you had to help the horse get up or not.

    My horse cast himself a couple years ago, a few hours after my daily visit. Several grooms had to pull him along the ground to get his legs out of the pipe corrals, and no one notified me of this. It was about 20 hours after he was cast that I showed up for my morning ride and he had three stovepipe legs. He wasn't lame at all just terribly swollen - but it was alarming and upsetting that no one had notified me they had to make the effort to get him free! Apparently at the time he was so weak from struggling he could barely stand.


    I've only had one horse I had to help when she got cast. It was my first horse, and she had total faith in humans. Any time she got herself in a bad situation she just froze and waited to be found - from getting loose, outside the barn area and into the fence storage area where she put her hoof through some livestock fencing rolls and waited for help to the time she rolled against a brick wall, to the time another horse in the trailer with her fell and rolled under her belly.
    She had rolled and all four hooves were against a brick wall. We could only move her top legs at first, so we pulled her to directly on her back with lead ropes around the top legs. We were then able to get her bottom legs over. We got her to her side and she waited until we were out of her stall and calmly got up as if nothing had happened. There were scuff marks where her hooves hit the wall as she rolled over and no others, so she did just lie there and wait for us to show up and free her with no struggling - a rarity I wish all horses were like!
    My horse is a dressage diva so I don't have to be.

    Quote Originally Posted by katarine
    If you have a fat gay horse that likes Parelli, you're really screwed



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Apr. 1, 2011
    Posts
    770

    Default

    Thanks for all the responses! I am thankful that in this particular situation I did not have to do anything, but now at least I have a little more knowledge to help me in case there is a next time. And I will definitely not attempt anything unless there is someone there to help me. With this particular horse, the BO (who is also a vet) was suspicious that he may have been suffering from a little bit of gas, so he was given banamine after getting up (and of course checked on later in the evening!) A few days later he is a little stiff but otherwise fine. I think the owner is going to have his chiro out to help him out a little.



  17. #17
    Join Date
    Mar. 24, 2007
    Posts
    1,807

    Default

    I've had to flip one on my horses on my own.......I got two polo wraps and found the middle and wrapped it one and a half times around the pastern on the underside leg both front and back then I took a polo wrap in each hand and put myself somewhere in the middle and pulled as hard as I could.....luckily my guy was so calm, no struggling or movement from him until he was flipped and able to get up.

    I've also had a horse cast himself in an outside door to the paddock......the back end was hanging in the air as it as a bit of a slope out the door......my daughter and I did manage to flip him back in side at a bit of an angle......but boy he was stiff when he got up as he had cut off his circulation.......he did walk it off with no problems.

    Also had a youngster cast herself but she was able to get out of it on her own both times......some how she would rock or throw her body to increase the space enough to give her room to get up.

    Dalemma



Similar Threads

  1. Stall size; horse gets cast?
    By 17Rider in forum Around The Farm
    Replies: 22
    Last Post: Feb. 20, 2012, 10:32 AM
  2. Cast horse:
    By Bluey in forum Off Course
    Replies: 18
    Last Post: Jan. 2, 2011, 08:43 PM
  3. Getting the Cast Horse Up Alone
    By horsepoor in forum Off Course
    Replies: 20
    Last Post: Feb. 15, 2010, 07:58 AM
  4. Replies: 17
    Last Post: Jan. 5, 2010, 01:38 PM
  5. Helping a cast horse
    By dani0303 in forum Horse Care
    Replies: 15
    Last Post: Oct. 31, 2009, 08:51 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
randomness