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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct. 25, 2005
    Posts
    1,093

    Default Anyone living an "alternative" lifestyle?

    The BF and I are planning to live in a pop up camper for part of this year. While it is all very hypothetical (most likely we will be staying in RV parks and camp grounds around the U.S.) I'm still really excited to be trying an "alternative" and different way of living--aka not a traditional apartment or house. Although don't get me wrong, I know it is heaps of work!

    Got me thinking--are any COTHers currently living differently and/or have you? Recommendations? Suggestions?

    Although you can just shake your head and say we're crazy!



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul. 31, 2007
    Posts
    15,946

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    Don't know if you are crazy, but I want in. I hope you'll let me know how it goes. My life in the next year could do a version of what your's is.

    A friend of mine lived with DH and two little kids in their 5th wheel for a year while their house was being built. If she can do it, you can do it.
    The armchair saddler
    Politically Pro-Cat



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul. 17, 2007
    Location
    Landrum, SC
    Posts
    1,984

    Default

    My fiance lived in a very basic yurt for a year. He and a friend were building a high-end mountain home in Victor, ID and the place was at the highest elevation, looking across the Teton Valley. They LOVED it.

    My brother lived in a teepee (huge) just outside Durango, CO for a year. Also lots of fond memories.

    My only "alternative" living has been aboard a variety of boats for months at a time. Big thumbs up.

    Go for it!
    Athletic Horses. Educated Riders.
    www.Ride-With-Confidence.com



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct. 25, 2005
    Posts
    1,093

    Default

    Thanks guys! Boat living was on the table for awhile (we had a 27 foot sailboat) but gave it to a friend as we decided that the boyfriend being seasick was not going to make it happen!

    And he builds and sells teepees so we love camping in one in the backyard one a nicer night.



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan. 4, 2007
    Location
    TX
    Posts
    44,521

    Default

    I knew a young couple, that had grown in the hippy world, that lived in a geodesic dome house they build themselves, the outhouse was in the back.
    There they had two kids and after some five years, finally an inside bathroom.
    They eventually grew up, divorced and moved on with their lives.

    Just be sure that you both are wanting the same and no one has to sacrifice to make the other happy, while being somewhat discontent.

    Have fun.



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb. 28, 2006
    Location
    The rocky part of KY
    Posts
    9,598

    Default

    DH and I lived on a boat for a long while. In NorCal the weather made it easy enough, there was a marina office with berth holder's bathrooms, showers and laundry, it was cheap and I liked it. DH didn't because he worked on boats and he wanted not to live on one too but the price was right, nice scenery - we had million dollar homes with us as their view, LOL.
    My BIL did the camper thing and that's harder. There's either Snowbirds or trailer trash depending on where you stay. I've read recently that there are communities of RV'ers that are doing migratory work for such as Amazon - they show up for the Christmas rush living in the company park and then go off to do their retirement/happy go lucky travels.
    Most campgrounds have a limit on how long you can stay so funding your travels can be hard - that's what mostly got the BIL - he didn't want to live in a trailer park and couldn't manage moving every two weeks to change campgrounds while staying within commute distance of a workplace.

    If you're just doing this for a half a year, you should have a blast and be able to see some really pretty places. Just please leave the genset off and don't watch TV if you are at the valley floor in some glorious place like Yosemite!
    Courageous Weenie Eventer Wannabe
    Incredible Invisible



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar. 12, 2006
    Posts
    2,215

    Default

    BF and I lived in a 16' cabin tent one spring/summer. He built a wood floor that extended beyond the tent so it was like a mini deck. We had a wood stove for heat and a three burner propane camp stove for cooking. Used an outhouse and a shower we set up under a big tree. I loved it, I remember that summer as one of the best times in my life. We felt so free. No worries about our "stuff" because we didn't have anything!

    When I retire I plan to live the life of a nomad.
    "All top hat and no canter". *Graureiter*



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Oct. 14, 2004
    Location
    Connecticut
    Posts
    9,067

    Default

    Haven't done it, but it sounds like a wonderful way to see the country.

    We live life only once... Congrats for trying something out of the ordinary. Have fun!!!
    MnToBe Twinkle Star: "Twinkie"
    http://i236.photobucket.com/albums/f...wo/009_17A.jpg

    Proud member of the "Don't rush to kill wildlife" clique!



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jul. 24, 2008
    Posts
    3,841

    Default

    Are you really well-trained in some field, such that you are guaranteed to be able to get a job when you're done this? Because honestly, when employers ask what you have been doing for the last year, to say that you've been living like a gypsy in a pop-up trailer doesn't look so good.
    Jigga:
    Why must you chastise my brilliant idea with facts and logic? **picks up toys (and wine) and goes home**



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Nov. 1, 2007
    Location
    Tampa Fl.
    Posts
    4,217

    Default

    I did the Combined driving show circuit in England for a summer and I lived in the carriage lorrie that had the horses stall tied to the side. (the walls of the lorrie lifted so the horses were under cover, and basiclly in the middle with me. 4 foot wall divider) I LOVED it. I had access to a lorrie with an LQ for a shower. But we had campfires, muck tubs full of Pimms, propane cooking, and enjoyed the English summer.

    The year before that I lived in a travel trailer we shipped to Holland for the summer and did that show circuit.

    Its wonderful. I love "roughing" it. For some reason it seems easier.

    check out getting a solar oven.



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Apr. 29, 2006
    Posts
    3,620

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by MunchingonHay View Post
    I did the Combined driving show circuit in England for a summer and I lived in the carriage lorrie that had the horses stall tied to the side. (the walls of the lorrie lifted so the horses were under cover, and basiclly in the middle with me. 4 foot wall divider) I LOVED it. I had access to a lorrie with an LQ for a shower. But we had campfires, muck tubs full of Pimms, propane cooking, and enjoyed the English summer.
    That sounds heavenly!



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jan. 4, 2007
    Location
    TX
    Posts
    44,521

    Default

    As students, my BF and I went hitchhiking all over Europe, twice, for several weeks at the time and had a ball.
    We stayed overnight generally in Youth Hostels, a few times just stayed out all night, wandering the old streets.
    We went to concerts, opera, walked miles in museums and attended some seminars at different universities.

    Had a grand time, but today, I am not sure that is an option, not in today's world.

    I would do whatever you both want, not question if it makes sense, life is too short, why not enjoy some of it doing what you want?



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Apr. 7, 2012
    Posts
    2

    Default

    Lurker out of lurkdom just for this post.

    Mobile living is a huge and growing alternative lifestyle in the current economy. More and more people are being forced from the traditional stix and brix and find living in a car, RV, van to be not only do-able but freeing. Not only that, but those of us that choose this life find it to be economical, and fun.

    There's an awesome website (complete with forum for questions and sharing) with all kinds of information to make it work.

    The website
    http://cheaprvliving.com/

    the forum
    http://www.cheaprvlivingforum.com/

    And, believe it or not mobile living is a greener lifestyle! Conservation of water, fuel and all types of waste is a big concern for those of us living off the grid. Bob, who created the above website also has a green RV living website
    http://cheapgreenrvliving.com/

    Good luck!

    P.S.
    I lurk on horse boards, living my horsey life vicariously through all of you so thanks for sharing!



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Apr. 4, 2011
    Posts
    113

    Default

    munchingonhay, i would love to do that!!

    my ex and i always wanted a yurt or geo dome. we lived on a campground for a while, in a tent, then in a little cabin. for a year, we lived in the mountains of western NC in a 100 yr old farmhouse on 15 wooded acres. we had no heat, a/c, or insulation, just a woodstove downstairs (which we cooked on often). we had a beautiful garden, and blew glass in the shed out back. the winter was COLD and we chopped our own firewood as needed, so often we'd go trudging through the snow to bring back a few more pieces when we ran out on the porch. our bedroom was upstairs and early in the morning when id get ready for work, it would be so flippin cold that id have to get dressed over the space heater.

    it was 25 miles to the nearest grocery store. our little 'town' was one stoplight with an auto repair shop/gas station, library, bank, and a pottery studio. there was no ambulance... youd have to call 911 and meet them at the heli pad behind the church 10 minutes from our house.

    it was inconvenient as hell but beautiful and so much fun.



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Apr. 7, 2012
    Posts
    302

    Default

    Good luck to YOU for having the courage to try an alternative lifestyle.

    It is surprising at all the stuff you will not miss having and how uncomplicated your life can be. Yes, you will have new challenges but can pick more of your challenges instead of having them forced upon you.

    Life should be an adventure.



  16. #16
    Join Date
    May. 18, 2011
    Location
    Southern Appalachia
    Posts
    265

    Default

    I spent 6 months backpacking Europe... I was very poor, hitchhiking, couchsurfing (www.couchsurfing.org) spent a few nights homeless under overpasses, only could afford marked off stale pastries (but I took mulitvitamins!!), etc.. did it all alone. But i needed adventure and time to "find" myself. I can't say I found myself other than realized how independent I am! I did meet this girl who very much lives an alternative lifestyle while I was in Germany. Lives in the middle of the woods in a camper. Would be really fun for a little while I think! Although, I think I had my adventure of a lifetime, I have so many good stories, I should really write a book one day on my travels! Right now I am OK with apartment living, I missed my animals too much! But I think I will have itchy feet for adventure again some day.

    I say go for it. I would totally be a gypsy if I could still somehow have horses and ride dressage doing so.
    You only have to let the soft animal of your body / love what it loves
    "Wild Geese" by Mary Oliver



  17. #17
    Join Date
    Oct. 26, 2010
    Location
    Orygun
    Posts
    2,947

    Default

    Once upon a time I lived in a 35 ft tall teepee. It was made by the company who made the "Dancing With Wolves" movie teepees. Anyway, ours had a second storey inside! We had a propane stove and used inverters and car/marine batteries. Marine batteries will come back up if you use them too far. Cell phones for calling. Used candles and oil lamps for lighting at night. Strangely, the candles and oil lamps provided way more light than an electric light. Listened to the radio a lot. Battery TV but could only get one channel. Eventually bought a camper and a travel trailer for bathroom and an oven.

    A neighbor bought a wrecked VW Beetle and used the engine for their power, using inverters. Another had solar panels and flat screen TV's/washer/dryer. Another had cable TV from batteries and the sun. Another had a little windmill on the top of his house and watched TV at night, after he came home.

    It was so quiet out there, you could hear your heart beat. Except for the ex being there, it was the perfect life, I thought. Except for the ex, one of the happiest times of my life.

    Right now, even though I live in a stick built home, I live about halfway to alternative.

    I had my horses, dogs, chickens, goats, rabbits...but, other than the horses, not all at one time. The dogs ate my rabbits when the goats rubbed their horns (they had escaped their pen) on the rabbit hutch's door and unlocked it. We also had trouble with some of the neighbors', who turned out were in the Witness Protection Program and were allowed to do what they wanted. On top of that, people who lived in town thought we were not-quite-trash, even though my ex taught at the college and had advanced degrees. They usually were surprised we were on the educated side.

    Sometimes I want to dump everything and live in our 5th wheel and call it a day.

    I forgot to add, we were going to build a solar house and never got around to it. One of the reasons was it was too much trouble. We were actually happy living the way we were....except for the ex being there!!
    Last edited by goneriding24; Apr. 8, 2012 at 05:59 PM. Reason: .
    GR24's Musing #19 - Save the tatas!!



  18. #18
    Join Date
    Dec. 5, 2001
    Location
    virginia
    Posts
    3,253

    Default

    I did briefly live that lifestyle working as a "field Tech" aka archaeologist. I lived 4 months in a $20 Montgomery Ward Pup tent. I slathered Thompsons Water Seal on the fly to make it water proof. I've also spent a couple weeks traveling across the western states and camping out of my truck. This was way before cell phones.

    recommendations; 5 gal water containers that are tall and narrow, easy to stack a couple side by side. I used a coleman propane 2 burner stove since I lived in campgrounds with picnic tables. ie I didn't hike into the backcountry I had my car/truck parked nearby. I loved having warm water for washing dishes and hands when camping. I used solar showers, a plastic bag that held 2 gallons of water that you left out in the sun to warm up. Most of the field techs lived out of their trucks and outfitted them like a sailing boat with tiny cabinets that held things, and an elevated platform bed with storage underneath.



  19. #19
    Join Date
    Nov. 28, 2000
    Location
    Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    11,642

    Thumbs up

    Quote Originally Posted by MunchingonHay View Post
    I did the Combined driving show circuit in England for a summer and I lived in the carriage lorrie that had the horses stall tied to the side. (the walls of the lorrie lifted so the horses were under cover, and basiclly in the middle with me. 4 foot wall divider) I LOVED it. I had access to a lorrie with an LQ for a shower. But we had campfires, muck tubs full of Pimms, propane cooking, and enjoyed the English summer.
    Sounds lovely to me too.

    When I was a child we had a cottage deep in the woods, on a remote lake.
    For years, there was no power, just oil lamps, a cookstove with a reservoir for hot water, an 'icebox',and a pump you had to pump by hand to get water.
    We bathed and washed our hair in the lake, and did laundry with a scrub board.

    It was heavenly.

    Nowadays we have the farm, but out back we have an old 1970's 'Scotty' trailer.
    My DH and I go out there most nights during the spring/summer/fall - far away from the phone,the computer.. we read,play scrabble, or Crazy 8's.
    It's not an alternative lifestyle, by any means, but for both of us it is a welcome escape.

    I agree with those who have said go for it, life is short....
    A FINE ROMANCE - JC Reg Thoroughbred - GOLD Premium CSHA - ISR/OLDNA Approved
    CSHA Brickenden Stallion Award Winner - for Performance offspring.
    Please visit A Fine Romance on FB!



  20. #20
    Join Date
    Jun. 23, 2004
    Location
    horse country, usa
    Posts
    773

    Default

    My brother and his wife are selling their million dollar property and moving into an rv because they want to travel. They are both retired now and didn't want a big property nor all the stuff. They have plans for two upcoming beach trips and plan to head to Baja Mexico for the winter.

    I'm envious of them to a point, however, I would want my horses with me and that wouldn't work.

    I did recently find a gorgeous property with an indoor arena that I would have gladly lived in an rv to have that property and barn/indoor...but i had already bought my farm.

    Will keep you posted to see how they like rv living!
    For things to do in Loudoun County, visit: www.365thingstodoloudoun.com



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