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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan. 30, 2010
    Posts
    333

    Default Saddle pads starting to slip - collected work?

    Mare and I have been working on some very collected canter work recently - interestingly, I have noticed that my saddle pads (dressage pad and Mattes half pad) have started to shift and slip as we work. The saddle has been fitted to her and I've never really experienced this issue before. It *seems* that the more she sits down on her butt, the more they shift. Has anyone else ever experienced this? We do a lot of collected trot and canter work during our rides with no shifting pads, but the other night was the first time I noticed this, and in that ride we really had focused on very collected canter/large canter pirouette steps.

    Am I totally off base to suspect these two things are related, or could it be something else? Not really sure the best way to address this issue! Hopping off and readjusting is a pain.
    Looks like I picked the wrong week to quit sniffing glue.

    A Voice Halted



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr. 1, 2003
    Location
    Cocoa, Fla
    Posts
    4,107

    Default

    With us it was a combination of things as collected work increased muscling on side of withers causing saddle to move. So used a Thinline pad to keep saddle from slipping and saddle maker (Verhan) moved front billet further front for a larger distance between billets, stablizing the saddle.
    Sandy in Fla.



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan. 30, 2010
    Posts
    333

    Default

    Bumping this back up - agreed, she likely has some additional muscling on her withers, but she hasn't drastically changed shape the last few months - we've been doing the same type of work but I supposed the addition of the very collected canter work is somewhat new...I'm just surprised because saddle slippage has never been an issue really, and it's just recently that I've begun to notice this, and even then as I said, only after she's really been sitting down.

    Currently I am using a regular Mattes sheepskin half pad on top of a dressage pad - the Mattes pad slips way forward during the canter work so it's shifted under the panels of the saddle. Is this something some non slip material could help to rectify?
    Looks like I picked the wrong week to quit sniffing glue.

    A Voice Halted



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug. 22, 2005
    Location
    mid-atlantic
    Posts
    2,418

    Default

    Keep in mind that saddle fitters usually fit the saddle to your horse while he's standing still. If he's doing correct collected work, his back's shape during trot & canter strides will be quite different than the standing-on-crossties profile.

    I would urge you to be your own saddle fitter, and imagine your horse's back lifted and reassess saddle fit. You could even engage a friend to poke his tummy and get him to lift his back, if he will oblige, while you get up on a step-stool and check your saddle's fit. It's quite possible that the back of the saddle is coming up, or that a saddle that does not bridge standing still is now rocking on a pivot point.
    "You become responsible, forever, for what you have tamed." - The Little Prince



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