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  1. #1
    Join Date
    May. 16, 2000
    Posts
    4,723

    Default Washing Machines

    Can anyone suggest a really good, reliable washing machine that can not only handle gentle/hand wash cycles but also be used for washing horse blankets? I've been going through all the options on the Sears site and have a headache. Thanks!
    Charter member of the I-Refuse-to-Relinquish-My-Whip Clique



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb. 16, 2003
    Location
    MI USA
    Posts
    8,004

    Default

    We purchased a Speed Queen top loader last time I bought a washer. I like top loaders for many reasons and after hearing so many unhappy owners of front loaders on here, I didn't even consider getting one.

    The advantages with my Speed Queen have been about the best warrenty on any brand. 3 years, if I remember correctly, covers everything.

    Second is washer has a huge stainless steel tub, so no buckles flopping will hurt it. I do quite a bit of horse laundy, so the stainless tub is a great deal to me. Can't rust if dinged. It holds quite a bit of laundry. I don't blanket regularly, so my blankets are not the super thick types. They are BIG, horses all wear 84s, but not thick layered. I would only put one blanket in at a time. Doing pre-wash stain treatments or soaking dirt loose, helps get things more clean in horse clothing or people clothing. Just "washing" things may not get stains out if you don't help the machine with some stain treatments. Most of those spray on treatments work VERY well, stuff comes out looking like new after washing it.

    Great spin cycle, gets things quite dry, so less dryer time needed. Faster drying on horse stuff I hang to dry to prevent shrinking.

    I can stop washer and add things to a load, reset the cycle and it does fine. Can't do that with front loaders full of water. Speed Queen has quite a few settings for water levels, so that will save water and fabric still seems to come clean.

    I don't need special soap products as some newer washer models ask for. I use Tide powder and get great results on TINY amounts of soap with our soft water. I get lots more loads of wash done than the soap box says it holds.

    The receipt says it is an AWN412, but the washer itself doesn't seem to have a model number. Just Speed Queen, Commercial Heavy Duty, Super Capacity Plus, 2-Speed, on the face. Our local store sells them, and this was only slightly more than the Sears model I thought I wanted. Sears model was one of the Consumers Report good buys, but not available for 6 weeks! I can't live without a working washer, we get DIRTY around here!!
    My mother has had the SAME Speed Queen washer for over 20 years, and they make the laundromat machines, so I was willing to go with Speed Queen and not wait for a Sears.

    We are into our second year with washer and quite happy with the machine. I consider it a step up from the Sears machines, which worked hard for me, but have only lasted about 8 years on average. We worked them very hard, they did some kind of laundry daily. Will have to see if this machine out lasts them. But a 3 year warrenty was a BIG seller to us, parts and labor. The salesman says they seldom ever have any problem with their Speed Queen machines, he highly recommended them. We have been quite happy with the Speed Queen dryer which is a year older than the washer, and other appliance products this same salesman has recommended to us. Store sells a variety of name brands, all good ones, has been in business quite a while.



  3. #3
    Join Date
    May. 16, 2000
    Posts
    4,723

    Default

    Thanks so much. This is very helpful. I was unsure of getting top loader or front, but your post has convinced me to stick with a top loader. Now off to find this model nearby!
    Charter member of the I-Refuse-to-Relinquish-My-Whip Clique



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov. 18, 2004
    Location
    Catonsville, MD
    Posts
    6,966

    Default

    DO. NOT. Buy a Whirlpool Cabrio, ours is broken after 15 months of regular use. I wanna smack someone. Of course the warranty is over.
    I tolerate all kinds of animal idiosyncrasies.
    I've found that I don't tolerate people idiosyncrasies as well. - Casey09




  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct. 12, 2010
    Location
    North Carolina
    Posts
    1,223

    Default

    LOVE my Samsung front loader and matching dryer! DH is a grading contractor so his clothes getting truly clean was definitely a test of the machine's capabilities. It handles his laundry quite well, in addition to my barn clothes, and the kids' sport uniforms.

    I will admit I haven't washed any BIG horse items in it, nor do I intend to. The only things horse-related were no-bow wraps and polo wraps, and a baby pad. I'd rather pay someone else to handle the hassle of blankets and heavier saddle pads, and luckily we have a shop nearby that can do it.
    Alis volat propriis.



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov. 4, 2003
    Location
    Sanger, TX, USA
    Posts
    5,261

    Default

    Have had a Samsung front loader for 4 years and still going strong. My guys
    wear an 82 and 84 and their thick blankets with belly bands don't get clean.
    The lighter stuff and sheets do fine. So the heavy ones go to the laundromat's biggest front loader.



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov. 12, 2003
    Location
    PA
    Posts
    108

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Lori B View Post
    DO. NOT. Buy a Whirlpool Cabrio, ours is broken after 15 months of regular use. I wanna smack someone. Of course the warranty is over.
    ^^^^ THIS. (Knocking wood)...mine is not broken, but I really REALLY hate this machine. I have contacted Whirlpool....and well, that was a joke.

    STAY AWAY from Whirlpool.



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan. 3, 2008
    Location
    Tennessee
    Posts
    256

    Default

    We have a Frigidaire front loader. Not especially expensive. Over 8 years old. I stuff it full on a regular basis. Have washed many horse blankets - 78-82. Have had no problems.



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Apr. 20, 2010
    Location
    Harpers Ferry, WV
    Posts
    2,828

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Lori B View Post
    DO. NOT. Buy a Whirlpool Cabrio, ours is broken after 15 months of regular use. I wanna smack someone. Of course the warranty is over.
    Very cheaply made. Whirlpool is no help.
    www.Somermistfarm.com
    Hunter Ponies & Quality GSDs
    www.UnleashedK9.net



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Sep. 18, 2003
    Posts
    4,735

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by goodhors View Post
    We purchased a Speed Queen top loader last time I bought a washer. I like top loaders for many reasons and after hearing so many unhappy owners of front loaders on here, I didn't even consider getting one.

    We are into our second year with washer and quite happy with the machine. I consider it a step up from the Sears machines, which worked hard for me, but have only lasted about 8 years on average. We worked them very hard, they did some kind of laundry daily. Will have to see if this machine out lasts them. But a 3 year warrenty was a BIG seller to us, parts and labor. The salesman says they seldom ever have any problem with their Speed Queen machines, he highly recommended them.
    I just bought a Speed Queen to replace my Maytag, which quit after 20 years. The salesman was showing me the newer, high-efficiency models (1100 RPM! and all the fancy cycles, etc).

    When I asked him about durability, he said don't expect one of these to last as long as your Maytag. OK ... then show me one that will and *ta-da* the Speed Queen. It was at least $100+ cheaper than the least expensive high efficiency machines, and I didn't want those preset cycles anyway.

    Two things I don't like as well as my old Maytag --
    1. Speed Queen is a little louder, but my washroom is in the basement, so not a huge deal;
    2. If you don't have at least a medium load on the gentle cycle,the clothes stay pretty wet. I imagine that's because of the bigger tub -- the clothes stay in the bottom, rather than the sides.

    I like everything else -- big, stainless steel tub and the 3-year warranty most of all. I've washed saddle pads in it on regular cycle and breeches on the gentle cycle. Will be doing the winter blankets in a few weeks.
    __________________________
    "... if you think i'm MAD, today, of all days,
    the best day in ten years,
    you are SORELY MISTAKEN, MY LITTLE ANCHOVY."



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Nov. 20, 2010
    Location
    Upstate New York
    Posts
    4,492

    Default

    I have a Whirlpool Duet pair - front loaders which I love, purchased about 10 years ago. They can do very delicate items, and I just washed my "non-washable" couch slip covers, and also a "non washable" extra large dog bed insert recently with no issues. Originally bought the front loader to be able to hold a king sized comforter which is no problem. Plus now that I'm back to owning, must use the washer for horse blankets (including heavy duty) & sheets as well, and they come out great. I just make sure I run the washer empty through a hot cycle in between the horse blanket and whatever's next!

    But from what I recall in past discussions of this topic, the newer front loaders do not do the job that those with a little bit of age do. Thus, when/if I move, they are comin' with me!
    How can there be so many currents in such a little puddle?
    National Velvet



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Mar. 26, 2005
    Location
    Back to Normal.. or as close as I'll ever get
    Posts
    10,371

    Default

    I cannot say enough good things about Sears' Kenmore line.

    My first set lasted over 25 years, for all I know the dryer is still working (sold the house 8 years ago & left it).

    It was a heavy-duty top loader circa 1979 & I washed horse blankets - 1200d, fiberfill - in it for years w/o a problem. One size 82 at a time never gave it a problem.

    I brought its replacement - also Kenmore HD - with me when I moved as it was only a couple years old.

    The house I bought has a 30yo set - also Kenmore top loader - and I was planning to use the older washer for horse laundry, but it is hooked up to drain into the laundry sink (??) and that is such a PITA that instead I use the newer model.

    If blankets are especially icky, I'll run a load of barn towels through after the blankets to pick up any hair left behind.
    *friend of bar.ka*RIP all my lovely boys, gone too soon:
    Steppin' Out 1988-2004
    Hey Vern! 1982-2009, Cash's Bay Threat 1994-2009
    Sam(Jaybee Altair) 1994-2015



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Aug. 31, 2011
    Location
    southeast Georgia
    Posts
    3,970

    Default

    My Sears Kenmore washer and dryer are going strong. They were purchased in 1979. I never tried to wash a horse blanket in them, but have washed many heavy loads of filthy, thick saddle pads with no problems.



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Aug. 6, 2000
    Posts
    520

    Default

    My front-loader Maytag washer was purchased in 2004 and has been in constant use ever since....and I mean constant like a few loads a day every day!! I highly recommend it.



  15. #15
    Join Date
    May. 16, 2000
    Posts
    4,723

    Default

    When I went to the Sears site, I quickly took Whirlpool off of my list because of the numerous poor reviews.

    Do any of you know what size machine I would need to do my horse blankets? It's not a must-have feature but rather a would-be-nice. More important is that there are enough temperature selections and wash settings (wool, delicates, etc.). I'm really leaning toward the Speed Queen and just want to know what model. When I went to their site, it had surprisingly little info.
    Charter member of the I-Refuse-to-Relinquish-My-Whip Clique



  16. #16
    Join Date
    May. 12, 2000
    Location
    NE TN, USA
    Posts
    6,223

    Default

    FWIW, I used to operate a chain of coin-op laundries.

    I like the Speed Queen. While it's more expensive, it's also more durable. I particularly like the stainless steel tub and the convenience of the old-style rotary mechanical timer. They are much less susceptible to power surges than the "modern" digital timers are. Besides, I'm old-school. I prefer knobs and switches over those ^&#$ tactile membrane buttons.
    “There are two ways to conquer and enslave a nation. One is by the sword. The other is by debt.”
    John Adams



  17. #17
    Join Date
    May. 16, 2000
    Posts
    4,723

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    I'm with you on all counts, Frank.
    Charter member of the I-Refuse-to-Relinquish-My-Whip Clique



  18. #18
    Join Date
    Jan. 10, 2007
    Location
    too far from the barn
    Posts
    5,864

    Default

    Something like this is fantastic. http://www.lg.com/us/washers/lg-WT51...op-load-washer
    We really like the top loader versus the front and the higher capacity. No agitator, so great for delicate stuff, but super for horse stuff too.
    OTTBs rule, but spots are good too!



  19. #19
    Join Date
    Oct. 28, 2007
    Location
    NY
    Posts
    5,080

    Default

    Sears kenmore is our choice and as Frank said, mechanical knobs. I read somewhere that the circuitry in the digital ones is/was the failure point in many machines.
    The economical ones, green water savers? Lots of complaints on those.

    I would seriously consider a second hand washer, if your local fix it man is good. Older machines often are built better last and last longer, and plenty of people throw out old machines that can be fixed simply because the repair didn't know how to fix it. Thus assumes of course that you have a trusty mr. Fixit guy somewhere in your town. Some of the problems are minor and some too costly to make it worth it.



  20. #20
    Join Date
    Aug. 25, 2007
    Posts
    11,012

    Default

    Buy a good quality "household" washer of your choice for your personal clothing.

    For "barn use" (equine "clothing" and gear) go to a reputable second hand store and buy something for under $100 (around here you can do that all day long). Only use it for horse gear. It will, ultimately, get clogged up with horse hair and become nothing but a large "paper weight." This will usually happen 3-4 years after purchase. At that point get rid of it and go buy another one.

    While this might seem "excessive" it will save the good machine in the house and there will be no complaints about "horse hair" in other household members' clothing.

    I think we are on "barn machine" #4 after more than 16 years.

    G.
    Mangalarga Marchador: Uma Raça, Uma Paixão



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