The Chronicle of the Horse
MagazineNewsHorse SportsHorse CareCOTH StoreVoicesThe Chronicle UntackedDirectoriesMarketplaceDates & Results
 
Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123
Results 41 to 57 of 57
  1. #41
    Join Date
    Mar. 10, 2009
    Posts
    5,491

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Bacardi1 View Post
    I think that's going a bit too far. You can't expect your neighbors to dig up their landscaping simply because it doesn't jive with your horsekeeping. It's up to YOU to deal with the issue.

    And as for replacing maples with Bradford Pears?? Lousy choice. Bradford pears are short-lived shallow-rooted trees that, while pretty in spring, are considered an over-used landscaping nuisance.
    Plus those pretty Bradford Pears stink when they bloom. I call them the "sperm trees" because they smell like, well, semen. A development near us went crazy planting those things and the air positively REEKS in spring when the Bradfords bloom.



  2. #42
    Join Date
    Sep. 29, 2006
    Location
    NW Oregon
    Posts
    549

    Default

    It would be well worth the money to offer to replace the acer rubrum with a larger safe tree -- and to do the digging and replanting for them. The worst that can happen is that they say no.

    For minis or small ponies, because of their smaller size it only takes a very few leaves to be deadly -- I've heard as few as 4 leaves. Unless one considers their horse disposable, this is not worth the risk.
    They're not miniatures, they're concentrates.

    Born tongue-in-cheek and foot-in-mouth



  3. #43
    Join Date
    Aug. 6, 2012
    Posts
    176

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Bacardi1 View Post
    I think that's going a bit too far. You can't expect your neighbors to dig up their landscaping simply because it doesn't jive with your horsekeeping. It's up to YOU to deal with the issue.

    And as for replacing maples with Bradford Pears?? Lousy choice. Bradford pears are short-lived shallow-rooted trees that, while pretty in spring, are considered an over-used landscaping nuisance.

    I wouldn't EXPECT a neighbor to dig up their landscaping. I see nothing wrong with offering to replace a small tree if it's a danger, and I certainly wouldn't be offended if a neighbor asked me to do the same. Wouldn't bother me in the least, especially if they paid for it and did the work.

    Seems like your harsh response is meant to make me feel stupid. I was simply offering up another suggestion.



  4. #44
    Join Date
    Sep. 5, 2011
    Posts
    2,966

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by LauraKY View Post
    You would think. However a year ago in the fall, my guys pushed down a fence to get to the neighbor's burning bush. Turns out they're mildly toxic. Three had the runs, but the fourth was very sick and ended up with laminitis. No one could believe it, my pasture looked like a golf course.
    Yes - "Burning Bush" is another bad one. My husband really likes the looks of them, but we decided against planting. Plus they're considered an invasive thanks to birds spreading the seed & how easily they sprout.



  5. #45
    Join Date
    Sep. 5, 2011
    Posts
    2,966

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by wcporter View Post
    This thread is 9 months old....??
    Uh, but with still relevant information, unlike a lot of old threads that get dug up on here.



  6. #46
    Join Date
    Nov. 8, 2012
    Location
    gulf coast
    Posts
    981

    Default

    Heavensdew what did you do? It's been 10 months, how did Autumn go?



  7. #47
    Join Date
    Sep. 11, 2011
    Location
    Charlottesville, VA
    Posts
    269

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by wcporter View Post
    This thread is 9 months old....??
    Yes, it is. I did a search for maple trees before starting a brand new thread and replied to this one since it already had multiple posts worth of good information. Isn't that the point of researching the archives before creating a new post on a topic that has already been discussed?
    "No hour of life is wasted that is spent in the saddle" - Winston Churchill

    Check out Central Virginia Horse Rescue


    1 members found this post helpful.

  8. #48
    Join Date
    Jun. 14, 2006
    Location
    VA
    Posts
    11,372

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Mara View Post
    Plus those pretty Bradford Pears stink when they bloom. I call them the "sperm trees" because they smell like, well, semen. A development near us went crazy planting those things and the air positively REEKS in spring when the Bradfords bloom.
    OMG! We call them "cum trees" too. Bahahaaa! It's AWFUL. We had one right outside our bedroom window at our old house and I hated to even open the windows in the spring.
    A good horseman doesn't have to tell anyone...the horse already knows.

    Might be a reason, never an excuse...



  9. #49
    Join Date
    Oct. 16, 2008
    Location
    Central Oklahoma
    Posts
    3,101

    Default

    You know, it takes "A LOT" for a horse to inject "3 pounds" of leaves to become lethal..... I mean, don't be stupid to fee them to the horses intentionally. A few blown in leaves? I wouldn't worry about it. I got a mature red maple in my front yard where the occasional escapees will roam into and one time one was playing with the maple before I shooed him off. None had suffered any ill effect yet.



  10. #50
    Join Date
    Sep. 29, 2006
    Location
    NW Oregon
    Posts
    549

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Gloria View Post
    You know, it takes "A LOT" for a horse to inject "3 pounds" of leaves to become lethal..... I mean, don't be stupid to fee them to the horses intentionally. A few blown in leaves? I wouldn't worry about it. I got a mature red maple in my front yard where the occasional escapees will roam into and one time one was playing with the maple before I shooed him off. None had suffered any ill effect yet.
    I'm guessing that your tree is not acer rubrum, which is the deadly one. Ironically, the maples that are red throughout the summer ARE NOT the deadly red maple. As pointed out above, acer rubrum is green with only a slightly red tinge until autumn.

    The key word in the above quote is "yet."
    They're not miniatures, they're concentrates.

    Born tongue-in-cheek and foot-in-mouth



  11. #51
    Join Date
    Jun. 17, 2007
    Posts
    347

    Default

    My next door neighbor lost his two draft ponies after they grazed during the day in their paddock which had a red maple tree outside the fence about 20' away.



  12. #52
    Join Date
    Jun. 30, 2006
    Location
    Middle Tennessee
    Posts
    4,769

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Bacardi1 View Post
    And you'll be saying that until one of your own horses eats something & becomes ill &/or dies that could have been avoided. Then you'll be back here singing another tune. Or perhaps not.

    Err on the side of caution. My gang is well-fed, but we DO have Wild Cherry & Red Maple bordering the fenceline. And I DO go out & pick up/rake up wind-blown branches & leaves asap.

    Wild Cherry & Red Maple toxicity isn't an old wive's tale - it's TOTALLY DOCUMENTED. Don't take the possibilities lightly, regardless of naysayers.
    No one is implying it's an old wives tale-- I have been apart of treating horses for maple leaf toxicity in my years working at New Bolton Center... not to mention all the horses we saw with "mystery" poisoning symptoms from who knows what plant. I've witnessed walnut-induced laminitis. Farms I worked at lost foals to tent worms in cherry trees. Heck, I own have a horse who gorges on acorns until she shows symptoms of acorn toxicity. I don't think I'm being laissez-faire-- I think I'm practicing common sense. Don't plant red maples as shade trees in your pasture, but also don't forgo a perfectly good farm on the chance that the neighbor's leaves MIGHT blow in the pasture.
    Don't fall for a girl who fell for a horse just to be number two in her world... ~EFO



  13. #53
    Join Date
    Feb. 6, 2000
    Location
    MA
    Posts
    12,661

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by susanne View Post
    It would be well worth the money to offer to replace the acer rubrum with a larger safe tree -- and to do the digging and replanting for them. The worst that can happen is that they say no.

    For minis or small ponies, because of their smaller size it only takes a very few leaves to be deadly -- I've heard as few as 4 leaves. Unless one considers their horse disposable, this is not worth the risk.
    You heard wrong--more like 3 pounds of dried leaves for the average horse.
    Ponies proportionately less. But still considerably more than 4 leaves.
    "It's like a Russian nesting doll of train wrecks."--CaitlinandTheBay

    ...just settin' on the Group W bench.



  14. #54
    Join Date
    Oct. 16, 2008
    Location
    Central Oklahoma
    Posts
    3,101

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by susanne View Post
    I'm guessing that your tree is not acer rubrum, which is the deadly one. Ironically, the maples that are red throughout the summer ARE NOT the deadly red maple. As pointed out above, acer rubrum is green with only a slightly red tinge until autumn.

    The key word in the above quote is "yet."
    Yeah. It is, Bloody Queen. The point is, it takes three pounds, not one, or two, or three leaves. Be careful, but don't get paranoid about it.



  15. #55
    Join Date
    Sep. 5, 2011
    Posts
    2,966

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Gloria View Post
    Yeah. It is, Bloody Queen. The point is, it takes three pounds, not one, or two, or three leaves. Be careful, but don't get paranoid about it.
    Sorry "Gloria", but "Bloody Queen" is NOT the red maple we're all talking about here. Do some research before spouting. The red maple that's toxic to livestock is NOT RED. Again - NOT RED in color. It has a slight reddish tinge to the leaf stems & GREEN LEAVES that are silvery on the underside. While there may not be a reason for folks to get "paranoid" if they have "Bloody Queen" on their property (although Japanese maples also contain some toxicity), there IS reason for folks to be "paranoid" about the toxic variety of acer rubrum. Please do some RESEARCH before telling folks they're being paranoid about a toxic plant.



  16. #56
    Join Date
    Sep. 7, 2009
    Location
    Lexington, KY
    Posts
    17,800

    Default

    Can you plant a thorny hedge along your perimeter to keep the neighbors out? Something like pyracanthra or holly.
    "We can judge the heart of a man by his treatment of animals." ~Immanuel Kant



  17. #57
    Join Date
    Jun. 30, 2006
    Location
    Middle Tennessee
    Posts
    4,769

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by LauraKY View Post
    Can you plant a thorny hedge along your perimeter to keep the neighbors out? Something like pyracanthra or holly.
    Both toxic... just sayin'...
    Don't fall for a girl who fell for a horse just to be number two in her world... ~EFO



Similar Threads

  1. Maple trees-toxicity-sugar vs. red
    By mstraebel in forum Around The Farm
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: Apr. 17, 2012, 10:30 PM
  2. Replies: 0
    Last Post: Jun. 28, 2011, 11:21 AM
  3. Red Maple
    By monstrpony in forum Horse Care
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: Apr. 23, 2011, 10:45 AM
  4. Maple Trees
    By tuppysmom in forum Around The Farm
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: Jul. 17, 2009, 07:28 PM
  5. Replies: 289
    Last Post: Jan. 3, 2008, 11:26 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •