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  1. #21
    Join Date
    Apr. 7, 2007
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    east coast
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    245

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    No, no connection.



  2. #22
    Join Date
    Dec. 14, 2007
    Location
    Wilsonville, Ontario, CANADA
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    4,378

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    Exactly this ...

    The maple family covers a LOT of ground, & most are harmless to horses. However, the "Red Maple" is extremely toxic, & it doesn't take a lot to fatally poison a horse.
    Here is a good article on the toxic red maples

    http://www.omafra.gov.on.ca/english/...cts/06-109.htm

    Because a maple has red leaves it doesnt mean its of the acer rubrum species

    Our local TSC store had a terrific special on red maples. I bought 4 to plant along my paddocks for shade.

    I THEN researched them and went $H!T!!! And up they came out of the ground 2 days later and back to TSC they went and I told the TSC staff they really needed to educate anyone buying them and warn them NOT to plant them anywhere horses are located

    Maybe its a one in a million chance that my guys would have gotten sick from these leaves but it wasnt a chance I was willing to take either ...



  3. #23
    Join Date
    Feb. 6, 2000
    Location
    MA
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    12,658

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    Quote Originally Posted by heavensdew View Post
    No, no connection.
    I was inquiring as to whther the poster who advocated killing trees on someone else's property was related, not you. (and it was somewhat tongue in cheek)

    You sound like a concerned horseowner, not a potential vandal.
    "It's like a Russian nesting doll of train wrecks."--CaitlinandTheBay

    ...just settin' on the Group W bench.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Sep. 11, 2011
    Location
    Charlottesville, VA
    Posts
    269

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    Is there a way to tell/test the maples to know for sure if they are toxic? We just realized there is a cherry tree in our pasture and want to take that down... we definitely have a few maple trees back there as well, but not 100% sure how to tell just by looking at the leaves.
    "No hour of life is wasted that is spent in the saddle" - Winston Churchill

    Check out Central Virginia Horse Rescue



  5. #25
    Join Date
    Feb. 15, 2004
    Location
    Ontario
    Posts
    7,973

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    If your horses have plenty to eat in their paddocks, they should not be interested at all in the maple leaves...


    1 members found this post helpful.

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Aug. 3, 2004
    Location
    Vermont
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    1,433

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    Quote Originally Posted by My3Sons View Post
    Any maple tree that gets a red vine in the leaf can be toxic...I had a green one removed because in the fall it would get a red vine.
    Acer rubrum aka "Red Maple" is the only maple that is toxic. Red Maple trees have green leaves (don't confuse them with a "purple maple" which has the dark purple colored leaves).

    Of course all maple trees turn color in the fall so you have to really do your research to determine if a maple tree is in fact acer rubrum.

    I have two red maples (along with some sugar maples and silver maples) that are on my fence line. They have been there for 30 years along with the horses.



  7. #27
    Join Date
    Jun. 14, 2006
    Location
    VA
    Posts
    11,372

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    Gosh. Have I been under a rock? I had no idea those were toxic to horses. I knew about black walnut. Maybe I've just never lived anywhere with a lot of red maples? I'll have to check that out. Interesting thread.
    A good horseman doesn't have to tell anyone...the horse already knows.

    Might be a reason, never an excuse...



  8. #28
    Join Date
    Aug. 12, 2002
    Location
    Calera, AL
    Posts
    1,901

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ghazzu View Post
    I was inquiring as to whther the poster who advocated killing trees on someone else's property was related, not you. (and it was somewhat tongue in cheek)

    You sound like a concerned horseowner, not a potential vandal.
    Pretty sure she meant she would have taken the trees down if she lived on that property: "would have been down in a sec if I lived there."


    1 members found this post helpful.

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Nov. 26, 2003
    Location
    NE FL
    Posts
    6,479

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    I have Red Maples in my pasture. I have 4. The leaves are toxic when they fall and begin to dry or for instance if a branch falls, etc. I make sure to get all the branches up as soon as they fall but I can't get every little leaf.
    I do make sure to have a roll out there so they have hay 24/7 and no need to eat the leaves, and when the grass is growing i have nice grass. As long as they have something else to eat they should not show interest in the leaves. We have been here 10 years.
    "Perhaps the final test of anybody's love of dogs is their willingness to permit them to make a camping ground of the bed" -Henry T. Merwin



  10. #30
    Join Date
    Apr. 14, 2001
    Location
    Fort Collins, CO
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    16,515

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    I think that 25' setback requirement gives you an excellent place to plant fast growing, thorny, thick evergreens. Make your neighbors disappear, keep them off your land, keep their crap out of your fields--including maple leaves--and provide a nice shelter belt for wildlife.

    I know if can be really tough to find good land close to town without a subdivision next door, but it's not something I would want to sign up for. There are entirely too many idiots out there



  11. #31
    Join Date
    Dec. 15, 2005
    Posts
    3,426

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    My horse ate the wilted leaves off a red maple limb back in June. The limb blew down from a neighbor's tree and landed in our pasture. I had no idea that the neighbor's trees were red maple, so I did not immediately remove the branch. My very well fed, 1600lb horse ate the red maple leaves despite having grass and hay in his pasture. The next day, he was quiet and ill appearing. He developed mild laminitis. Most of the hair on his face fell out so he was pretty bald. His gums were pale. Fortunately, he recovered.

    I will be immediately removing any downed branches from the pasture in the future.



  12. #32
    Join Date
    Dec. 29, 2012
    Location
    La La Land
    Posts
    478

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    I realize you are talking about Red Maples, but since the point is toxic trees, and the Black Walnut has been mentioned, I just wanted to add the Black Locust to the list. These are real bad espescially the pods that drop in the fall. Its all about awareness, and threads like this are great.



  13. #33
    Join Date
    Sep. 2, 2005
    Location
    Upstate NY
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    12,146

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    Quote Originally Posted by OTTBcooper View Post
    we definitely have a few maple trees back there as well, but not 100% sure how to tell just by looking at the leaves.
    The link that Truecolors posted shows many types of maple tree leaves so you can do a quick comparison.


    I do not think it is safe to say that if you feed them they will not eat them as a blanket statement. It really depends on the horse(s). Know your animals and know your trees and do what is necessary.

    I had a very large red maple in my hedge row that would drop leaves in my dry lot. I had it removed. I own horses that like to eat things and are always on a diet. Leaves are yummy.



  14. #34
    Join Date
    Jun. 30, 2006
    Location
    Middle Tennessee
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    4,763

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    I'm going to go out on a limb (no pun intended!) and point out that many common trees have varying levels of toxicity to horses. The same goes for indigenous weeds, ornamental landscaping plants, etc.

    You'll go crazy trying to avoid them all.

    So long as your horses have plenty to nosh on, it's unlikely they'll eat the stray red maple leaves that blows into the pasture. It would not be a deal breaker for me-- I'd just keep an eye on the situation in the fall.
    Don't fall for a girl who fell for a horse just to be number two in her world... ~EFO



  15. #35
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    Sep. 5, 2011
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    2,966

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    Quote Originally Posted by Texarkana View Post
    I'm going to go out on a limb (no pun intended!) and point out that many common trees have varying levels of toxicity to horses. The same goes for indigenous weeds, ornamental landscaping plants, etc.

    You'll go crazy trying to avoid them all.

    So long as your horses have plenty to nosh on, it's unlikely they'll eat the stray red maple leaves that blows into the pasture. It would not be a deal breaker for me-- I'd just keep an eye on the situation in the fall.
    And you'll be saying that until one of your own horses eats something & becomes ill &/or dies that could have been avoided. Then you'll be back here singing another tune. Or perhaps not.

    Err on the side of caution. My gang is well-fed, but we DO have Wild Cherry & Red Maple bordering the fenceline. And I DO go out & pick up/rake up wind-blown branches & leaves asap.

    Wild Cherry & Red Maple toxicity isn't an old wive's tale - it's TOTALLY DOCUMENTED. Don't take the possibilities lightly, regardless of naysayers.



  16. #36
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    Aug. 3, 2004
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    Vermont
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    Quote Originally Posted by TrueColours View Post

    http://www.omafra.gov.on.ca/english/...cts/06-109.htm

    Because a maple has red leaves it doesnt mean its of the acer rubrum species
    Right...acer rubrum (aka Red Maple) has green leaves not red like the name suggests (of course they change color in fall).

    In that article is the following statement:
    "Ingestion of wilted or partially dried red maple leaves from fallen or pruned branches causes lysis of the red blood cells with the subsequent development of a hemolytic anemia, which can be deadly."

    This is what I've always been told...the wilted/dried leaves "from fallen or pruned branches" are toxic....not the natural dead leaves that fall after foliage season.



  17. #37
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    Aug. 6, 2012
    Posts
    176

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    How old are the maples? If they've been newly planted or are fairly young you could simply explain to the neighbor that they're are a potential threat to your horses and offer to replace them with the non-toxic tree of their choice. Of course that won't fly if they're older mature trees.

    Where I am they clear cut for subdivisions so most of the trees are just saplings. A fast growing Bradford Pear or something similar might be a good replacement.



  18. #38
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    Sep. 5, 2011
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    2,966

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    Quote Originally Posted by Remington410 View Post
    How old are the maples? If they've been newly planted or are fairly young you could simply explain to the neighbor that they're are a potential threat to your horses and offer to replace them with the non-toxic tree of their choice. Of course that won't fly if they're older mature trees.

    Where I am they clear cut for subdivisions so most of the trees are just saplings. A fast growing Bradford Pear or something similar might be a good replacement.
    I think that's going a bit too far. You can't expect your neighbors to dig up their landscaping simply because it doesn't jive with your horsekeeping. It's up to YOU to deal with the issue.

    And as for replacing maples with Bradford Pears?? Lousy choice. Bradford pears are short-lived shallow-rooted trees that, while pretty in spring, are considered an over-used landscaping nuisance.



  19. #39
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    Sep. 7, 2009
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    Lexington, KY
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    Quote Originally Posted by FalseImpression View Post
    If your horses have plenty to eat in their paddocks, they should not be interested at all in the maple leaves...
    You would think. However a year ago in the fall, my guys pushed down a fence to get to the neighbor's burning bush. Turns out they're mildly toxic. Three had the runs, but the fourth was very sick and ended up with laminitis. No one could believe it, my pasture looked like a golf course.
    "We can judge the heart of a man by his treatment of animals." ~Immanuel Kant



  20. #40
    Join Date
    Apr. 29, 2011
    Location
    Maryland
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    2,114

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    This thread is 9 months old....??
    Barn rat for life

    The Big Horse



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