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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr. 7, 2007
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    Default Should I be worried about the neighbors red maple trees?

    We are putting a bid on a small property today that is next to a fairly new development of houses. I see some red maples in back yards. We will have to put our pasture fence 25 feet from the borders but should I worry about those leaves blowing onto our property in the fall? Will the horses eat them or avoid them?



  2. #2
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    Aug. 30, 2001
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    Purcellville, VA
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    I wouldn't worry. Just don't rake them up and dump them in your pasture.


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  3. #3
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    Aug. 28, 2007
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    Triangle Area, NC
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    The odd leaf wouldn't freak me out. That said I would communicate to your new neighbors that they can't feed them to the horses or start a compost near your fence line.
    What was to be my first horse died the day before money was to exchange hands because the neighbor shared a compost with the horse owners pasture and dumped red maple leaves. (lots of stupid in this story)
    www.destinationconsensusequus.com
    chaque pas est fait ensemble



  4. #4
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    Mar. 6, 2009
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    Default Perhaps a SIGN on the backside of your fence for neighbors ?

    Perhaps ( if this sounds 'sound' for your situation ) a SIGN on the backside of your fence indicating that the red maple leaves are poisonous and not to be fed to horses.

    Or just a general sign
    "DO NOT FEED HORSES PLEASE !THEY ARE ON SPECIAL MEDICAL DIETS "
    Zu Zu Bailey " IT"S A WONDERFUL LIFE !"


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  5. #5
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    Feb. 28, 2006
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    The rocky part of KY
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    Default

    I have a very large Red Maple in my front paddock and haven't had any trouble in the two years we've used it. I do cruise and pick up fallen branches with green leaves, green leaves that have been blown off, and occasionally rake and remove leaves in general.

    I don't recommend putting your pasture fence right up against subdivision boundaries because the homeowners will feed your horses grass clippings and just junk from over the fence - my Mom's next door neighbor used to feed the horses behind her day old bread, so the red maples may be the least of your worries.
    Courageous Weenie Eventer Wannabe
    Incredible Invisible


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  6. #6
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    Jan. 28, 2008
    Location
    Warren County, NJ
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    I would be very worried! I know of a farm near me who had some branches break and leaves blow over..they had 4 with maple leaf poison and lost 1.

    Any maple tree that gets a red vine in the leaf can be toxic...I had a green one removed because in the fall it would get a red vine.

    My feeling is to reduce any risks when you can.
    Until one has loved an animal, a part of one's soul remains unawakend. ~Anatole France~
    www.EquineKneadsLLC.com



  7. #7
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    Jan. 26, 2006
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    Fort Worth, Texas
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    Default

    few horses would be alive in Kentucky if every maple leaf eaten killed a horse as most pastures there have many maple trees


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  8. #8
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    Apr. 8, 2005
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    Quote Originally Posted by clanter View Post
    few horses would be alive in Kentucky if every maple leaf eaten killed a horse as most pastures there have many maple trees
    This. You can't worry about every little thing. Cherry trees (wilted leaves anyway) are a whole lot more toxic than red maple and there are cherry trees everywhere in KY! I have a few along my line fences only because I never remember to cut them down in the winter when they have no leaves.



  9. #9
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    Oct. 28, 2007
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    NY
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    Can you have a double fence to keep humans from reaching over to feed? I don't know how expensive chain link is, but that will keep leaves out too. Then have an interior fence for the horses.



  10. #10
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    Apr. 7, 2007
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    east coast
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    Most of the houses have a perimeter fence and ours will be in 25 feet. I was upset about that lost pasture space but now I have rethought it and like a double barrier between humans and horses!



  11. #11
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    Sep. 5, 2011
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    Quote Originally Posted by clanter View Post
    few horses would be alive in Kentucky if every maple leaf eaten killed a horse as most pastures there have many maple trees
    Ahhh - but there are "Maple Leaves/Trees" & there are "Maple Leaves/Trees".

    The maple family covers a LOT of ground, & most are harmless to horses. However, the "Red Maple" is extremely toxic, & it doesn't take a lot to fatally poison a horse.

    It's a very common tree in the northeast - & particularly in the Mid-Atlantic/south. In fact, they're one of the very first trees to announce spring as their buds are deep burgundy-red & can be seen for miles as they dot the woodlots & mountains here.

    I, unfortunately have quite a few in my woodlot - one very attractive & very old one next to one of my fenced fields. Whenever we have high winds or a heavy storm, I make a point of going out & raking up any/all fallen leaves/branches - along with the also inevitable wild cherry leaves/branches - as wind-blown/wilted material is the most dangerous. Thankfully, since my gang is well-fed, they don't seem very interested in any flotsam/jetsam. Still, it's better to be safe than sorry.

    As for posting signs, I think it would be better to get to know the neighbors instead of doing that. Signs for next-door neighbors without reason/understanding to the reader look/feel snobby. I'd be doing a personal friendly visit before resorting to that.


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  12. #12
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    Sep. 24, 2004
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    Piedmont Triad, North Carolina
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    Quote Originally Posted by heavensdew View Post
    Most of the houses have a perimeter fence and ours will be in 25 feet. I was upset about that lost pasture space but now I have rethought it and like a double barrier between humans and horses!
    I would just have enough space between the fences for what ever mower or tractor I used. 25 feet is over kill and wasted energy/fuel to maintain.



  13. #13
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    Apr. 7, 2007
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    east coast
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    I know it is a waste but it is the township zoning law. And....a township employee is one of the neighbors. .



  14. #14
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    Sep. 26, 2008
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    Are there any weeds near the trees that need a bit of round up



  15. #15
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    Actually i have never had a tree that I would knock down (they are still up but I give them the side ways eye every now and again) until I saw a house that would have had the best views ever ... except for the 2 trees that totally blocked the view. After semi subtile questioning it turned out they were there for sentimental reasons ... would have been down in a sec if I lived there. A quick few drills in the trunk add a bit of round up (with water) and guess what they would be dead woops. Then I would have planted something less view blocking.



  16. #16
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    Nov. 1, 2005
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bacardi1 View Post

    The maple family covers a LOT of ground, & most are harmless to horses. However, the "Red Maple" is extremely toxic, & it doesn't take a lot to fatally poison a horse.
    Before we planted next to our riding ring I did some research on red maple and that is what I discovered as well. Apparently it is the compound that causes the red colour of the leaf that is poisonous.

    Frankly though, I predict you will have more trouble from keeping horses next to a subdivision. It just never seems to go well.
    I love cooking with wine. Sometimes I even put it in the food.



  17. #17
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    Mar. 28, 2012
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    Quote Originally Posted by heavensdew View Post
    Most of the houses have a perimeter fence and ours will be in 25 feet. I was upset about that lost pasture space but now I have rethought it and like a double barrier between humans and horses!
    It will make a nice riding spot too.



  18. #18
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    Oct. 12, 2001
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    it won't be a "double barrier" though with 25 feet in there and no way to block the neighbors from entering from their side of the 25 foot zone- it'll turn into a walking path/ playground/ garbage dump area. It would only be a "double barrier" if YOU put in a tall, electrified no-climb fence on the outside of the zone and also put in a fence to keep the horses in on the inside of the zone.



  19. #19
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    Jan. 31, 2003
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    I have a perimeter fence and an interior fence and love it. It makes a huge track to ride on

    As far as maples.. IME if your horses have appropriate pletiful forage they are unlikely to eat things they shouldnt. As long as its not too close I think you will be ok
    "Kindness is free" ~ Eurofoal
    ---
    The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances.


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  20. #20
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    Feb. 6, 2000
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    MA
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    Quote Originally Posted by lolita1 View Post
    Actually i have never had a tree that I would knock down (they are still up but I give them the side ways eye every now and again) until I saw a house that would have had the best views ever ... except for the 2 trees that totally blocked the view. After semi subtile questioning it turned out they were there for sentimental reasons ... would have been down in a sec if I lived there. A quick few drills in the trunk add a bit of round up (with water) and guess what they would be dead woops. Then I would have planted something less view blocking.
    Charming.
    Are you related to the neighbor from the other thread that cut down the OP's trees?
    "It's like a Russian nesting doll of train wrecks."--CaitlinandTheBay

    ...just settin' on the Group W bench.


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