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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb. 19, 2011
    Location
    Portland, OR
    Posts
    836

    Default Oh what do I do with this horse??

    Where to start . . . ? (this is not an ad, as this horse is not currently for sale).

    What does one do in this tough market when they have a "Princess and the Pea" (pee, ha ha! See explanation below) type horse that is difficult to place, that really needs to go right about NOW? She is older (16), small (15.2), talented (TL/1st lvl dressage, jumping, trails, quick hind leg, beautiful piaffe and passage at liberty), sensitive (TBx), mare (sensitive) that really needs to go (have had her 10 years, but I am downsizing) NOW, but the only interested parties are beginning rider adults who also have 13 year old kids who want to ride? (Sure, if their kid can ride like I did when I was when I was their age, absolutely! But they just don't make kids like they used to. :-( ). People automatically think that because of her age she should act like an old lady and be dead broke, but instead, she acts like she is about 4. ;-)

    I have had all sorts of working students and young people ride her over the years, and she was awesome for them.

    She is a bit of speedy gonzales and probably should have pursued barrel racing or some speedy sport (jumping? eventing?) in another life. Is it too late for that?

    She could make a really tactful dressage rider happy, BUT she is so "Princess and the Pea" that she requires a very tactful seat who understands the balance, not clamping or banging the legs (piss her off and she might just kick out). I have always joked that she was my $500 Grand Prix horse since we got her 10 years ago because of her warmblood like gaits, athleticism, cadence, piaffe and passage at liberty. Too bad she was low horse on the totem pole and I never pursued her talent (not that she cares). She could also be a school horse for intermediate riders.

    If I did not have a bunch of DWBs, I would be happy to keep her and pursue her talent myself. I have kept her for this long because I love her and she is easy to be around. As it stands now, she is just not a priority over her cousins. There is only one me, and too many of them. :-( Bottom line, somethings got to give.

    So what to do? I really not sure where to value her, and hate to give her away, but I am wondering if that is the route I should go? What about donating her somewhere?

    Thank you for listening.
    Last edited by Dutch Lovin' Dressage Rider; Mar. 21, 2012 at 06:11 PM.



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul. 17, 2006
    Location
    Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    1,113

    Default

    Yes, this horse is a "giveaway", i'm sorry to say.

    In this market, bla bla bla.. yes, it's true.. people are giving away sound, sane & easy older horses for free. It doesn't matter how talented she is if she's tricky/difficuly/uber-sensitive to ride/deal with. Basically, from what you have said, anyone taking her on and assuming all her expenses & care would be doing *you* a favor, not the other way around. So it does not make sense to ask for $$ for her.

    There are still plenty of homes for free horses - and giving them away does not mean they would not be treated well. Take myself, for instance - i could never afford to plunk down more than a few thousand dollars for a horse, but that's because the ones i have get the best care possible, from chiro/massage to custom tack to supplements & top quality feed (not included in board) to one of the best (& most $$) farriers in the area... so please do not assume that anyone who can't shell out big bucks up front won't take excellent care of your mare.

    Cut your losses now and offer her up as free to a good home.

    Good luck! It's a terrible market!



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar. 8, 2004
    Location
    Baltimore, MD
    Posts
    20,173

    Default

    There was a pea under the stack of mattresses, she did not wet the bed. I agree that you should give her away since you have so many DWB to deal with that she isn't worth your time.



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar. 16, 2000
    Location
    Chatham, NY USA
    Posts
    4,100

    Default

    Possible donation to a GOOD school equestrian program?

    Carol
    www.ayliprod.com
    Equine Photography in the Northeast



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr. 8, 2004
    Location
    The Great, uh, Green (?!?!) North!
    Posts
    3,870

    Default

    Free lease her on your property, under your supervision. If you find THE ONE for her that way, look at gifting her to that person. If you cannot do that, sell one of the Dutch horses to cover her retirement.

    (And LR - thank you for correcting the pee/pea. Drives me nuts when you see them swapped!).
    "Adulthood? You're playing with ponies. That is, like, every 9 year old girl's dream. Adulthood?? You're rocking the HELL out of grade 6, girl."



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan. 31, 2010
    Location
    Alberta
    Posts
    3,913

    Default

    I would explore other careers for this horse. Could she be a competitive trail horse? Or just a trail horse in general? Team penner? Gymkhana horse?

    What about a pony club mount?

    Offering a lease to own may help you find someone more likely to consider your horse as well. I would do that before giving a horse away, even if you end up waiving the payment in the end.



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb. 5, 2002
    Posts
    2,072

    Default

    My friend owns a horse who sounds a lot like yours, adopted after she failed at a university riding program. I second the idea of finding someone to lease her on your property and then, hopefully, giving her to that person after they click. You might be surprised to find an adult re-rider who enjoys a hotter type of horse and will think she's great.



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jul. 23, 2008
    Location
    Da UP, eh
    Posts
    767

    Default

    Free lease... You might be surprised how good some of today's youth are. Could be that you aren't the only one who can ride this mare to her potential.

    A small, 16 yo, training level horse won't command a high price, especially if she can't be ridden by a training level rider.


    LOL @ LR! That was my first thought too!



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb. 7, 2007
    Posts
    1,399

    Default

    I would definitely contact Pony Club. There are a lot of needy kids out there who could benefit from your horse. Even if you didn't give her directly to a Pony Club kid, an instructor might be able to take responsibility for her and then lease her to deserving students.



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Feb. 19, 2011
    Location
    Portland, OR
    Posts
    836

    Default

    It is me who is really The Princess and The Pee! Had to laugh at my own type oops! You see I have pee or peeing on the brain after having kinda minor Kidney infection in the fall, and subsiquent flare up of an ulcerated bladder condition that then came out of a 10 year remission. (sorry if TMI) Fun! Two procedures/operations later, feeling a bit better. So ha ha on me! :-). (at least I can now laugh at these things).

    Thanks for all of your advice! Excellent ideas and options! :-)



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jun. 27, 2001
    Location
    Chesterfield, NH
    Posts
    1,374

    Default

    She sounds like the right kind of horse for someone like me. We are out there! I have a mare and am not looking but just saying.

    I like mares, I need small, I don't have the time or the money to be showing much at all (although I really want to, reality is such a bitch!), with a talented rider in a daughter who will need a horse like this in a couple of years for Pony Club. Offer her on Giveaways or as a free lease with a tight contract, check references etc. She could end up in a wonderful home, although it may not be fancy she'd end up with an experienced rider who would love her for who she is.
    The mare I have right now IS YOUR MARE! 16 years old, sensitive mare, Trained through First level but you really need to push the right buttons to get her to act anything like it, has a good brain most of the time but is overly attached to my pony and a pain in the tush because of it. She is just barely 15.3 and gray. She is my heart horse and my husband doesn't understand at all. But I'm experienced enough to know she's a diamon in the rough and I bought her for $700 last year! She's my LOVE!
    We are out there! Give her a chance to find her person.
    Grab mane and kick on!



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jun. 30, 2009
    Posts
    6,998

    Default

    You mare is NOT the typical Giveaway in my area - sound AND trained through 1st level AND jumps AND trail rides - she'd actually sell for a few K,
    how many would depend on how long you were willing to wait/look for the appropriate home




  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jun. 15, 2010
    Posts
    2,471

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by alto View Post
    You mare is NOT the typical Giveaway in my area - sound AND trained through 1st level AND jumps AND trail rides - she'd actually sell for a few K,
    how many would depend on how long you were willing to wait/look for the appropriate home

    Maybe. OP, your mare sounds a lot like mine. We both have the hard situation of having essentially a lower level horse that requires a decent rider with quiet legs, an independent seat, and forgiving hands (am I wrong here?). Many of the riders who have that skill are either already riding at a higher level and have no need for a lower level horse, or want a horse they make move up through the levels. Not many are skilled enough to handle a sensitive horse tactfully but have no desire to go up the levels and are willing to take on a older horse.



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Dec. 21, 2008
    Location
    Missouri
    Posts
    2,201

    Default

    If you are being truthful about this mare and her only problem is she is sensitive? ( i don't see this as a problem). She is no giveaway I have ever seen. I think dumping her off as a giveaway after having her 10 years is doing her a disservice. The free lease / lease on site is a good way to find the right rider for her , then if in your heart you feel it is a good match-- give her to the person.



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Feb. 19, 2011
    Location
    Portland, OR
    Posts
    836

    Default

    Thanks guys! Nice to see that her clones are out there and that people see value in such a horse.

    Candyappy - the problem lays in the fact that when I listed her for sale, and the ONLY people that respond are the ones like those I've mentioned. I was shocked at how many beginning level dressage women riders also have young (7-13 children) who ride, and that many of those children are young boys. Of course when I asked if they understood a half halt, how steady their leg is, if they understood a balanced seat and seat aids, they didn't know what I was talking about. This type of rider would likely be a mismatch for this horse

    The actual qualified riders who would enjoy a horse like this didn't respond. EVER.. Is it because she was too cheap and wasn't over 5-10K? Because she's not a WB, even though she has WB movement? Because she's small? When I showed her last year, I had several people comment on how cute she was.

    I texted my vet friend who is also a dressage rider yesterday, and she is asking around.



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Nov. 16, 2004
    Location
    NE Indiana
    Posts
    5,530

    Default

    I would be leary of giving her away and I personally think a sound, L1 horse that is trail safe, is very marketable. Heck, I'd be interested if I weren't full.

    I love teenaged horses. There are others like me out there - don't throw her away just yet! Just put on your marketing hat (or ask for help here designing a good ad). SOmetimes the ad is what draws a specific type of looker....

    If you were closer, I'd tell our local PC about her. They've taken in an older TB gelding for me and it worked out great for the kids.

    ETA: "throw her away" was a poor term choice...i know you wouldn't do that. I think I meant: don't give up yet!
    Last edited by hundredacres; Mar. 22, 2012 at 04:19 PM. Reason: wrong word



  17. #17
    Join Date
    Feb. 19, 2011
    Location
    Portland, OR
    Posts
    836

    Default

    Thanks. Not giving up yet! I am still optomistic that the right situation with the right person will present themselves. I really love her and care for her, that is why she has impeccable care all of her life, and that is why I still have her. :-) She is just not for everyone . . . .


    If I did assess a price to her if/when I am ready to list her, where do you suppose it should be


    BTW, my ex husband was adamant about buying her because he wanted to get her and her foal years ago "so she could mow the grass"! Seriously! About the most expensive darned lawn mower I've ever hear of if we calculate initial purchase price plus care over 10 years! (I wonder how many JD lawn mowers I could have gotten?). ;-)



  18. #18
    Join Date
    Oct. 12, 2007
    Location
    Andover, MA
    Posts
    5,845

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Dutch Lovin' Dressage Rider View Post
    Candyappy - the problem lays in the fact that when I listed her for sale, and the ONLY people that respond are the ones like those I've mentioned. I was shocked at how many beginning level dressage women riders also have young (7-13 children) who ride, and that many of those children are young boys. Of course when I asked if they understood a half halt, how steady their leg is, if they understood a balanced seat and seat aids, they didn't know what I was talking about. This type of rider would likely be a mismatch for this horse

    The actual qualified riders who would enjoy a horse like this didn't respond. EVER.. Is it because she was too cheap and wasn't over 5-10K? Because she's not a WB, even though she has WB movement? Because she's small? When I showed her last year, I had several people comment on how cute she was.
    As someone else said -- most "qualified" riders for a horse like this are going to be looking for something they can move up with, possibly a bit younger. Money may or may not be an issue; there are always good riders around who have less budget than they'd like, but again -- do they want a horse like this?

    I think most TL and First Level riders -- certainly those of us who know we will not go higher -- are going to put rideability and a nice disposition ahead of most other things. All the talent in the world is worthless if the horse intimidates you -- I know this from experience! Most of us are probably not the "qualified" rider you're looking for.

    I do like the idea of offering an on-farm free lease with the understanding that if the rider and horse get along, the rider can have the horse for free or at a very low cost.

    Also, she does sound like she'd make a nice Pony Club horse, if she jumps and trail rides as well as doing LL dressage. Some fearless teen could have a lot of fun with her for a few years.

    Is it possible to get her out to a few schooling shows or something like that, to help get the word out that she's available?
    You have to have experiences to gain experience.

    Proudly owned by Mythic Feronia, 1998 Morgan mare; G-dspeed Trump & Minnie; welcome 2014 Morgan filly MtnTop FlyWithMeJosephine



  19. #19
    Join Date
    Feb. 19, 2011
    Location
    Portland, OR
    Posts
    836

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by quietann View Post
    As someone else said -- most "qualified" riders for a horse like this are going to be looking for something they can move up with

    She is by no means topped out at TL/1st. She knows lateral work. Half steps. (as I joked earlier - my $500 GP prospect - although she cost way more than that 10 yrs ago when I got her). She has just been low horse on the totem pole, and a bit of a generalist with a dressage foundation. Too many other horses to work on over the years, and I just enjoyed having her around. It has been nice having a horse that I could put HS equestrian team kids on.



  20. #20
    Join Date
    Aug. 11, 2008
    Location
    MD
    Posts
    3,834

    Default

    I'd definitely try the free lease route before giving her away. If she's sound and can jump, she's a perfect match for an experinced petite rider or pony clubber who maybe wants to try lower level eventing? In my area, she'd probably be a hot commodity.

    Have you tried contacting a h/j or event trainer that might take her for a resale project? If you find the right person, they could work with her, price her appropriately and sell her on commission.

    She sounds like she's too good a quality horse for a giveaway. She just needs to get exposure in a market where hot horses are not a problem. You don't want a timid adult dressage rider, you're looking for a brave eventer type with a good solid foundation.
    Lowly Farm Hand with Delusions of Barn Biddieom.
    Witherun Farm
    http://witherun-farm.blogspot.com/



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