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  1. #1
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    Aug. 4, 2009
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    MD
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    Default Pour In Pads..Thoughts

    Doing a survey..How many of you routinely use Pour in Pads when shoing your horses??

    Or do you just use them for competition.



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr. 30, 2002
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    Looking up
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    Answer: it depends.
    I use a full pad on Rug in the summer when footing turns to concrete, or when I'm likely to be schooling on concrete or rocky footing someplace. I don't use the full synthetic pad in winter when likely to be in muck or soft footing that could create a suction and pull the shoe off. I have used the pour-ons, but I find that if a horse's sole is that tender, or needs that much protection, a full pad does a better job protecting it, allowing it to heal or recover, and then the pour-ins can be used a bit later on. A full pad is going to change a horse's movement a bit -- and balance -- but a good farrier can help with that, I think.
    With my particular horse I sacrifice movement to get protection. Now if he were a 5yo aiming for the FEI class at Dressage at Devon I'd have to use the pour ons! They are expensive for the amount of protection they provide I think. I know some people swear by them, and I do think they are a good tool in certain circumstances -- but most of the time I'm using a full cheapo pad to do the same thing. It goes without saying that the farrier has to know how to apply both types of course.
    "Passion, though a bad regulator, is a powerful spring." -- Emerson
    www.eventhorse.wordpress.com



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov. 1, 2010
    Location
    VA
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    Default

    Almost never. Depends on the horse. May cause too much sole pressure for some horses.



  4. #4
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    Feb. 10, 2010
    Location
    Joppa, MD
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    564

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    A horse here at the barn uses them. She has extremely thin soles. No idea if they are helping her soles thicken or anything, but she seems to do fine in them. She is just doing very low level dressage so no idea how they'd hold up to any fast work or rough terrain. I know she occasionaly loses one before she's due to be done, but the shoe stays put. She didn't want the problem of moisture staying up under the pad.



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar. 4, 2008
    Posts
    23

    Default

    I've tried them with one of my prelim horses (flat-footed TB) but they always fell out as I did more jumping/galloping. My farrier tried doing it right before a competition but one didn't make it through XC. Perhaps it was just this particular horse but my farrier has opted just to go with rim pads which seem to help just as much so far!



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul. 3, 2007
    Posts
    538

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    I use the blue Vettec stuff on my gelding, but underneath leather pads. He had a tendency to get footsore after cross country, leading to stops on the drops. Haven't had a stop at a drop fence since starting to use it, so I guess he feels beter... (Or, I learned how to ride! )



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct. 22, 2001
    Posts
    5,085

    Default

    My Prelim horse gets them in front like clockwork around late May every year, just when the ground starts getting hard. He's got decent enough feet, but as he gets older, the pads seem to keep him more comfortable: purely anecdotal, but he seems more willing to take a bigger step with them in than otherwise. I've never (knock wood) had one come out unless the horse loses the entire shoe. I do know some folks who have not had good luck with them, and I'm not sure I'd try them with an inexperienced farrier, but with someone who knows what they are doing, I think they can be great.



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun. 1, 2002
    Location
    Indiana
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    10,995

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    It isn't the same but my mare had problems with abscesses so we ended up putting leather pads and packing that smelled like venice turp. on her fronts. I stopped having abscess problems as soon as I put the pads on. It's much cheaper, and you can reset the leather 2 - 4 times. Plus it breathes easily. I had pads on her for over a year with no breaks and her feet looked great after I took them off. If it helps I can upload pictures.



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jul. 27, 2006
    Posts
    484

    Default

    Use them regularly on the front of our thin soled TB competing at the Intermediate level. Sometimes will put new ones in for a competition just to make sure he is comfortable throughout cross country. I have been told by people that they don't do much, but from our experience his little footsies get sore without them.



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Nov. 13, 2002
    Location
    Maryland
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    3,571

    Default

    My mare would get them when the ground started getting hard in the summer. First year I had her I learned she would get footsore with conditioning work in the summer unless I put pour ins in and she did not have any issues on that score after I started using them
    She had soles on the thinner side and they did seem to help with that too
    They stayed in pretty well.
    There is something about the outside of a horse that is good for the inside of a man.(Churchill)



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Dec. 27, 1999
    Location
    Midland, NC, USA
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    I use them on my thin-soled Prelim horse but I use a mesh 'pad' under the shoe and then pour in the material and that way no worries about losing them.

    Jennifer



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Dec. 10, 2004
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    Canada
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    I used them for my guy when he was rehabbing after he broke his coffin bone. He wore them through the season going prelim and for his CCI* long format, but after that I switched to leather pads and I noticed no difference other than cost. Leathers are cheap, last through a few resets and they breath. I found the pour ins lasted me about 3 1/2 weeks and fell out right before the farrier was due. After they came out, he was very sensitive.



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jan. 19, 2005
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    PA
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    Quote Originally Posted by ThirdCharm View Post
    I use them on my thin-soled Prelim horse but I use a mesh 'pad' under the shoe and then pour in the material and that way no worries about losing them.

    Jennifer

    That is what my farrier always did when I used them.

    I have just used a leather pad more often though if I'm just looking for some added protection. I go with whatever my farrier thinks is best for a particular horse.
    ** The difference between genius and stupidity is genius has its limits. -- Albert Einstein **



  14. #14

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    My horse wears them year round in the front, we're doing Novice/moving up to Training. He injured his front right a few years ago, got it stuck in a stall door and cut most of the inside quarter off. Now that it's grown out, he's completely sound, but we use the pads to help with concussion, maintain good sole pressure (which works for him), and help prevent bruising. We may take them off for 1 or 2 shoeings in the winter, depending on how much work he's in. He's sound without them, they are more for prevention and protection.

    He wears a Grand Circuit T shoe on the front, which creates a deeper area for the pour in to sit in, which probably helps w them staying in. And my farrier also puts a rubber mesh thing in between his hoof and the shoe for the pour in to grab on to. He has pulled the pour ins out when we've been cantering/jumping or when he's turned out and playing around, but as long as he has bell boots on they seem to stay in (he does get shod every 4-5 weeks though).

    For cross country/horse shows, to help w traction, my farrier will use only half to 3/4 of the pour in and make it a little thinner near his toe, so he has a little more grip on the ground and that does make a difference in our being able to turn more easily on grass (especially if I have to go in the morning when there is still dew). Heel support is more important for my horse so it works for us, other people might not be able to do that.

    Another factor in using pour ins over other types of pads, is that he also gets corns/bruises fairly easily and these pads aren't "attached" to the foot by any extra nails or rivets. The rubber mesh thing that holds it in just sits between his foot and his shoe and doesn't bother him.

    I've also heard of people using leather pads, and putting magic cushion under them to help promote circulation and hoof growth.
    Hope this helps!



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Feb. 3, 2000
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    Nokesville, VA
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    After Belle dumped my, and ran aound the rock hard Waredaca course without me (2007), she was intermittently, but sometimes quite severly, lame in the left front.

    We never did get a real diagnosis. MRI showed edema in the navicular bursa in BOTH front feet. But blocking the left front foot made her completely sound, so that couldn't be the real cause.

    My farrier, based on some things he observed, suggested pour in pads, and my vet agreed. She came sound quite quickly after that. We stopped the pour in pads after about 6 months (when he ground was not hard).

    But the a year or so later she was off on the same foot again (which was by then, of course, excluded from her insurance). We put her in pour in pads, and she was sound again. I asked if we should go without them in the winter, but the vet said to keep them in.

    So far (fingers crossed) she has stayed sound with the pour in pads.

    But I would only use them if they were clinically needed. I wouldn't use them as a routine procedure. None of my other horses use them.
    Janet

    chief feeder and mucker for Music, Spy, Belle and Tiara. Someone else is now feeding and mucking for Chief and Brain (both foxhunting now).



  16. #16
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    May. 2, 2001
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    Tallahassee, FL
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    Default

    The pour in pads can be a lifesaver for certain horses.

    Ben wore them for almost all of his competition years -- and so did Buzz.

    Application will make all the difference for them staying in. The mesh makes a big difference, and so does the foot being clean and dry when the pour in goes in.

    The reason my farrier preferred them for a horse that needed the cushioning was two fold -- not only did it transfer the sole pressure from the ground, encouraging the sole to thicken, which he said he didn't see with other types of pads, but also leather or rubber pads which were nailed on gave one more layer between the foot and the shoe to create friction where the nails passed through, and he believed they led to loose shoes and a higher incidence of shoe loss.

    Ben did great in them until we pulled his shoes and turned him out to try to take him barefoot -- he lost so much sole depth from simply walking barefoot in the abrasive sandy areas of his paddock that when we had to go back to some kind of protection for his feet to keep the coffin bone from exposure, he could no longer tolerate the pressure of the pour ins, so my farrier had to invent a special shoe for him.

    The pour ins did NOT work well for one of my horses that I did some endurance with. Great protection against slightly rocky trails, but they would get eaten up doing even limited distance.

    YMMV, of course, but I love the Vettec stuff!
    *Proud member of the Hoof Fetish Clique*
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  17. #17
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    Jan. 19, 2005
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    PA
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bensmom View Post
    The reason my farrier preferred them for a horse that needed the cushioning was two fold -- not only did it transfer the sole pressure from the ground, encouraging the sole to thicken, which he said he didn't see with other types of pads, but also leather or rubber pads which were nailed on gave one more layer between the foot and the shoe to create friction where the nails passed through, and he believed they led to loose shoes and a higher incidence of shoe loss.

    Agreed but the leather also reduces some of the shock from the metal shoe stricking the hard ground. So for some horses...this cushion is as important and protecting the sole.
    ** The difference between genius and stupidity is genius has its limits. -- Albert Einstein **



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