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  1. #1
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    Default Disinfecting Paddock Soil

    I will be moving one of my horses into a paddock that was previously occupied by a horse with chronic pigeon fever and has been vacant for a few months. I heard that limestone ( lime something ??) might work? Any other ideas? TIA
    "Reite dein Pferd vorwärts und richte es gerade.” Gustav Steinbrecht



  2. #2
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    Default

    I don't think you could disinfect it--have you talked to a vet about procedures or done an internet search for solutions? I think the easiest way to avoid contact with the soil would be to cover it with a layer of gravel--say 8" or so, perhaps with a geotextile cloth base, then add your stone?


    A quick Google search led me to several articles that explain that there is no way to "disinfect" soil, and removal of soil where pus or drainage occurs is vital, but whole areas can't be disinfected with bleach and the like. The bacteria is spread by direct contact and flies. I think adding a thick layer of new footing would help, as well as perhaps using a bleach solution on fences and shelters?
    Last edited by Calvincrowe; Mar. 15, 2012 at 12:19 AM. Reason: more info
    Proud member of the "Don't rush to kill wildlife" clique!



  3. #3
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    Default

    You may be able to burn it off.
    Probably not the safest way to get things done around a barn though.
    Charlie Piccione
    Natural Performance Hoof Care



  4. #4
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    Default

    This is not my property, it's a boarding barn, so bringing in new footing won't be feasible. I'll see my vet in a couple of days and will discuss with him then, but wanted to get a head start. I did some google searches, but found nothing of value.
    "Reite dein Pferd vorwärts und richte es gerade.” Gustav Steinbrecht



  5. #5
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    Default

    If this article is correct, it sounds like the paddock shouldn't be used at all. Horses pawing the soil brings the bacteria back up to the surface and it's spread by flies. Sounds like all the horses would be at risk. But, I know almost nothing about pigeon fever...

    http://www.nbcdfw.com/news/local/Hor...137701913.html
    Last edited by LauraKY; Mar. 15, 2012 at 10:38 AM.
    Join the Clinton 2016 campaign...Hillary For America. https://www.hillaryclinton.com/



  6. #6

    Default

    tek trol has a good record with soil contact

    Tamara
    Production Acres,Pro A Welsh Cobs
    I am one of the last 210,000 remaining full time farmers in America.We feed the others.



  7. #7
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    Default

    Most of Northern California is infected with Pigeon Fever, it is literally everywhere. It's spread by flies and randomly pops up places. Your best defense is to have a healthy horse and during fly season to use a paste fly ointment on the midline.

    You might want to bleach the paddock, rake it in, and bleach the walls of the stall and fences in the paddock to make yourself feel better, but your horse standing in a paddock covered with puss doesn't necessarily make her any more susceptible than a horse half a mile away.



  8. #8
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    Default

    btw, what is "chronic" pigeon fever? I have never heard of such a thing. PF has a lifespan like chicken pox, how was it "chronic"? A case that never went away?



  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by Perfect Pony View Post
    btw, what is "chronic" pigeon fever? I have never heard of such a thing. PF has a lifespan like chicken pox, how was it "chronic"? A case that never went away?
    it means that like some cases of strangles it settles in the body and cannot be removed in the normal ways
    Tamara
    Production Acres,Pro A Welsh Cobs
    I am one of the last 210,000 remaining full time farmers in America.We feed the others.



  10. #10
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    Concord, NH
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    Default

    A friend used to work in a dog kennel and talked about disinfecting the play yard (sand) that the dogs went into - some sort of spraying. You might check into what they use for that proscess.



  11. #11
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Tamara in TN View Post
    it means that like some cases of strangles it settles in the body and cannot be removed in the normal ways
    Tamara
    That sounds awful, I seriously have never heard of such a thing with PF. My mare's PF was the worst experience of my life, I cannot imagine dealing with it constantly.

    But fwiw (to the OP) she got it during rehab for surgery and after she had a serious reaction to her vaccines. The other horses on the property where she was were that became infected very young are had issues. The vets told me that flies in Nor Cal are carrying it all over the place, it management of flies and making sure your horse is healthy that helps, but location of infected horses or soil doesn't mean a whole lot. It just rears it's ugly head all over the area when the conditions are right. On a property with 50 horses only 3 became infected, and they were very far away from each other.



  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Perfect Pony View Post
    btw, what is "chronic" pigeon fever? I have never heard of such a thing. PF has a lifespan like chicken pox, how was it "chronic"? A case that never went away?
    The horse had a compromised immune system and had a very, very long episodes of recurring pigeon fever and lymphangitis (eventually even non-responsive to anti-biotics and had to be put down). None of the other horses at the barn got PF even she was actively treated. I boarded at this barn for a long time, I'm just looking to do what I can to minimize risk. I'll use bleach for all the hard surfaces, but thought someone might have heard of something else for the soil
    "Reite dein Pferd vorwärts und richte es gerade.” Gustav Steinbrecht



  13. #13
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Tamara in TN View Post
    tek trol has a good record with soil contact

    Tamara
    Super, thanks!
    "Reite dein Pferd vorwärts und richte es gerade.” Gustav Steinbrecht



  14. #14
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    Default

    On second thought, maybe I take my chances with the PF. Tek Trol is phenol based and according to OSHA:

    * Summary of toxicology

    1. Effects on Animals: Phenol is an irritant of the eyes, mucous membranes, and skin; absorption causes convulsions as well as liver, kidney, and other systemic damage [Hathaway et al. 1991]. In animals, the predominant effects of acute toxicity are exerted on motor centers in the spinal cord, which induces marked twitching and severe convulsions. Following absorption of a toxic dose, the heart rate first increases and then becomes slow and irregular; the blood pressure initially rises slightly and then falls markedly. There may be salivation and marked dyspnea, and the body temperature usually decreases [Clayton and Clayton 1982]. The mean lethal concentration for rats inhaling phenol vapors is 316 mg/m(3), and for mice it is 177 mg/m(3). The oral LD(50) values are 317 mg/kg and 270 mg/kg for rats and mice, respectively. In rabbits, the dermal LD(50) is 850 mg/kg [NIOSH 1991]. Prolonged oral or subcutaneous administration of phenol to animals can cause damage to the lungs, liver, kidneys, heart, and genitourinary tract. Prolonged inhalation of vapor concentrations in the range of 30 to 60 ppm causes respiratory difficulties, lung damage, loss of weight, and paralysis [Clayton and Clayton 1982]. In contact with rabbit eyes, crystalline or concentrated aqueous phenol causes almost instantaneous white opacification of the corneal epithelium; 8 hours after application, the cornea is anesthetic, the surface ulcerated, and the stroma opaque. Five weeks later, scarring of the conjunctiva and opacity of the cornea occur. In addition, glaucoma has been induced experimentally in rabbits by injected 5-percent phenol subconjunctivally [Grant 1986]. Phenol administered by gavage has produced fetotoxic effects in rats and mice. An increased incidence of leukemia and lymphomas has been reported in rats receiving 2,500 ppm of phenol in drinking water for 103 weeks, although phenol was not considered to be carcinogenic. In mice treated twice weekly for 41 weeks by application of one drop of a 10-percent solution of phenol in benzene to the shaved dorsal skin, papillomas occurred in five of 14 animals after 52 weeks, and a single fibrosarcoma appeared at 72 weeks. Phenol may act as a nonspecific irritant to promote the development of tumors when it is repeatedly applied in large amounts to the skin [Hathaway et al. 1991].
    "Reite dein Pferd vorwärts und richte es gerade.” Gustav Steinbrecht



  15. #15
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    Default

    In order for bleach to be effective you have to remove all organic matter. Any organic material will make the bleach ineffective. So if you're doing it on all the hard surfaces make sure you clean them thoroughly with soap and water first. It won't do anything for soil. You need to find a disinfectant that wont become inactivated when in contact with organic material.



  16. #16
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    BC, Canada
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    Default

    Sunshine (lots of it) has, in my experience, always been a VERY good disinfectant.
    Disclaimer: I know nothing about PF.



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