The Chronicle of the Horse
MagazineNewsHorse SportsHorse CareCOTH StoreVoicesThe Chronicle UntackedDirectoriesMarketplaceDates & Results
 
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 30
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec. 19, 2010
    Posts
    46

    Default Need Help with Facility Layout

    Hi there everyone,

    I was wondering if anyone had any good examples of nice multi-discipline training facilities you would like to share. We are looking for some examples of farms with multiple arenas, barns, and lots of pasture and paddocks.

    We are in progress of designing and planning our facility. We would like to include a main barn with an attached indoor area, a training barn for me, a covered jump arena, a few outdoors for dressage and jumping, grass jump ring, and a small cross country course.

    Please reply with links or info or PM me.

    Thanks for the help.



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb. 23, 2005
    Location
    Spotsylvania, VA
    Posts
    12,829

    Default

    Much of that is really dependent on your terrain. Your local Soil and Water Conservation Service or DNR should be able to help.

    I rode in 2 clinics here

    http://www.wyndham-oaks.com/facility.htm#The Indoor Arena
    I wasn't always a Smurf
    Penmerryl's Sophie RIDSH
    "I ain't as good as I once was but I'm as good once as I ever was"
    The ignore list is my friend. It takes 2 to argue.



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov. 24, 2006
    Posts
    1,125

    Default

    I would look into how barns have their indoors attached. Ours is open above to the main barn's hay loft- and there's alot of dust from the indoor. I wouldn't do that if I was designing. That indoor generates lots and lots of dust sometimes. Just a thought to keep in mind.
    Kerri



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun. 15, 2001
    Location
    MA
    Posts
    1,107

    Default

    Agree on attached indoors. I know that any structure will eventually be coated in dust, but who wants to accelerate the process? If it were my choice, no hay loft and no attached indoor.
    Disclaimer: My mom told me that people might look at my name and think I had an addiction other than horses. I don't; his name was Bravado.



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan. 4, 2007
    Location
    TX
    Posts
    40,174

    Default

    Indoor arenas separated by a wall and doors from the stables, all under one roof, don't necessarily have to be a dust problem for the stable area.
    I know many that are not.
    The convenience of attached buildings, other than hay, that is a real fire hazard, should be stored in it's own separate building, is priceless in bad weather.



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec. 19, 2010
    Posts
    46

    Default

    We are thinking of building our main arena 100 x 200 feet and making 100 feet of it covered and the other half uncovered. On the side there would be a 12 stall barn with a wash rack, a few cross ties, and a big tack room.

    There is a place I ran across which has an arena similar (http://eremonfarm.com/facilities.html) but no barn attached. One question is what is the best way to design turnouts?

    Since we are going to be building about 50 stalls, we don't want individual paddocks for everyone. Should we maybe do 15 paddocks and some bigger grass pastures and offer half day turnout?



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec. 19, 2010
    Posts
    46

    Default

    Bluey, there was a barn near us that recently had a bad fire and lost several horses. We are defiantly building a separate hay and bedding barn and its going to be one of the modular barn types that is fire safe. Our feed and grains going to be in separate sheds outside each barn too.



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Oct. 11, 2002
    Location
    Colorado
    Posts
    4,608

    Default

    Weather/wind directions, drainage, and orientation of the slope of the land (in areas with cold winters) are the first things to consider. They will dictate a lot of what you plan.
    Comprehensive Equestrian Site Planning and Facility Design
    www.lynnlongplanninganddesign.com



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Dec. 19, 2010
    Posts
    46

    Default

    We are going to be building on top of a hillside so drainage will be pretty good. We were thinking that we were going to put all the barns and paddocks on the higher part of the property then the pastures and cross country course down below as well. The site is 120 acres and most of it will be usable, just a little to steep for stuff.



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Aug. 2, 2004
    Location
    Whidbey Is, Wash.
    Posts
    9,656

    Default

    Wow, how luck you are to be at this stage of planning out what sounds like a nice facility!! I bet you are excited (and stressed).

    I created a thread that discussed attached v not-attached indoors, and there was a lot of good discussion there on that.

    An example of a barn with, I think, good layout, is my Mom's facility. I'm still on the fence with attached indoors of any good size, because of the cost. But she has one barn that is 120' long with 16 stalls, and another barn with a few stalls and hay/equip storage right next to it, about 20' away. Making a second building an indoor might be more cost effective than a wide span for an attached indoor??

    I wish I could put up a Web site, but hers just isn't that good anymore and it doesn't have as many pictures as it did before....
    Aisha, my heart from 03/06/1986 to 08/22/2008.

    COTH's official mini-donk enabler.
    Odie, aka the Evil Burrito, is on Facebook.



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jan. 4, 2007
    Location
    TX
    Posts
    40,174

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by TheJenners View Post
    Wow, how luck you are to be at this stage of planning out what sounds like a nice facility!! I bet you are excited (and stressed).

    I created a thread that discussed attached v not-attached indoors, and there was a lot of good discussion there on that.

    An example of a barn with, I think, good layout, is my Mom's facility. I'm still on the fence with attached indoors of any good size, because of the cost. But she has one barn that is 120' long with 16 stalls, and another barn with a few stalls and hay/equip storage right next to it, about 20' away. Making a second building an indoor might be more cost effective than a wide span for an attached indoor??

    I wish I could put up a Web site, but hers just isn't that good anymore and it doesn't have as many pictures as it did before....
    Not necessarily, may be the other way around, as building an arena and following the roof line with an attached area for stalls, tackroom etc. is cheaper than building two whole structures.
    If nothing else, that common wall/supports is cheaper than two of those.

    That is what we may build some day, takes the less material and labor to build and less labor later to run, everything being under one roof.
    This is the way so many bigger barn/arenas are built any more, cost the least, easiest to work from and practically no maintenance to them.

    Scroll down to the grey building with attached stalls on the long sides:

    http://www.ranchandgolf.com/miscprojects.html

    Still, each one has their own preferences, cost is only one of the considerations.

    (Does anyone know why some links I just can't open, keeps saying "Safari can't open the page ... ")



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Aug. 2, 2004
    Location
    Whidbey Is, Wash.
    Posts
    9,656

    Default

    Bluey, you provided a lot of information on the thread I linked to . And I did more reading and liked the idea of the "main" structure being the indoor, and a "lean-to" for the barn area. The way I was reading it, since the "lean-to" doesn't share the spans, it'll be cheaper.

    Cost goes up with width, after all.

    DH and I are still throwing ideas around. The one he likes the most, is the one I absolutely abhor, but I'll put it up for the OP to see. It's a large arena (with calf chutes and round pen in it), and the stalls, tack room, etc are along the top/short side and more stalls down one long side. Hay storage is at the bottom/short side. No real good pictures, but the Web site shows one small pic down at the bottom of the training page. The aisle has to be sweep several times a day when the indoor is getting used, and you have to blow off a spot on the wall to lean your arms, or else you get FILTHY.
    Aisha, my heart from 03/06/1986 to 08/22/2008.

    COTH's official mini-donk enabler.
    Odie, aka the Evil Burrito, is on Facebook.



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jan. 4, 2007
    Location
    TX
    Posts
    40,174

    Default

    If we get to some day build our barn, a neighbor is part of this, we will buy the whole 120' x 250' metal barn kit and erect it ourselves from the certified engineering specs that come with those, that are approved by counties and insurances.

    Then, later, for the overhang on a long side for stalls and on the front for the roping chutes, we will buy the metal for framing and the sheet metal locally and build it ourselves from that.
    While you tie in to the main building, the overhang can be made easily self supporting, or close to it.

    The local company is not even close to competitive with the prices of the larger ones, so for the main building, we will buy from them.

    You may consider getting whoever builds it for you to check into that.

    Now, if someone has more financing, they can get those companies that turn key build the whole thing and those tend to be very good, just very costly.



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Dec. 19, 2010
    Posts
    46

    Default

    I think ill post some of my ideas on here for you guys to look at. I have a ton of layouts I have been working on and rearranging. We probably are going to attach some stalls onto a covered arena and have a open concept design with European stall fronts and then maybe shared paddocks behind for every few stalls and so on days they can't go into the field they will get out for a few hours.

    I recently visited a barn like that and it seemed to function quite well. One issue I see with a bunch of barns is that the cross ties are in the aisle so your constantly moving to let people go by. Thanks for the feedback everyone!



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Jun. 24, 2005
    Location
    PA
    Posts
    3,246

    Default

    If you need dimensions or more specifics - just pop us a note. If you scroll down this page, you'll see our layout. We started (in 1970) with the old cow barn, renovated it to 12 stalls and then added the indoor in 1980, stallion barn (6 stalls) in '86. The paddocks are pretty much Jenny Craig dirt lots now, but we have easy keepers for the most part, so that works just fine.

    As for dust & the indoor being attached to the barn and above the stalls hay storage - all of that depends on your management and topographical layout! We have loft storage in both barns and maintain the footing in the indoor so there is very, very little dust with excellent airflow from the barn into the indoor, not the reverse...so it is possible!



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Dec. 19, 2010
    Posts
    46

    Default

    Here is one of our first designs. 14x14 Stalls with european stall fronts so its pretty open, big tack room, three cross ties, and maybe one of them a wash rack or we'll add one where a stall is. We do want plenty of cross ties because we go through horses quick and my working students will have a bunch out all the time. I am going to put a shedrow near this barn most likely for school horses and some of mine. Since these stalls are the biggest we'll have I want to save them for boarders only.

    http://www.freeimagehosting.net/t/1xhjb.jpg



  17. #17
    Join Date
    Dec. 19, 2010
    Posts
    46

    Default

    Sorry the picture didnt come out well, I'll try and get a better one.



  18. #18
    Join Date
    Dec. 19, 2010
    Posts
    46



  19. #19
    Join Date
    Feb. 14, 2003
    Location
    Windward Farm, Washougal, WA- our work in progress, our money pit, our home!
    Posts
    6,759

    Default

    Having boarded for years, and worked in boarding barns--feed storage inside the barn (grain, at least) is much easier on the help, especially with a long barn aisle.

    As a boarder--attached indoor is more attractive than a walk to the indoor from the stalls. Having the option to have mud-free paddocks to the stalls and turnout is very, very attractive (those paddocks need to be cleaned daily, so it adds to your labor costs though).
    Proud member of the "Don't rush to kill wildlife" clique!



  20. #20
    Join Date
    Dec. 19, 2010
    Posts
    46

    Default

    I might add the feed and med room back onto the barn, it does take up space for stalls though which was my concern. What if it was placed closer to the front of the barn, do you think that would help?

    The paddocks are something I looked for when choosing a barn because some days the pastures were to wet and I didn't mind having my horse take a day off pasture so they can grow a little or at least not get worse. There is a barn nearby which has small paddocks off each stall, probably about 12x12 which is nice so they can get fresh air, then they have 10 big paddocks with sand for them to go in throughout the winter.



Similar Threads

  1. Pasture Layout
    By mactanscott in forum Around The Farm
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: Dec. 30, 2011, 10:56 AM
  2. Help w/Page Layout
    By FancyASB in forum Help Forum
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: May. 31, 2010, 02:42 PM
  3. PM layout difficulties
    By slp in forum Help Forum
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: Jul. 14, 2009, 08:29 AM
  4. Help with pasture layout?
    By dmalbone in forum Around The Farm
    Replies: 14
    Last Post: Jun. 14, 2009, 08:09 PM
  5. What do you think of this barn layout?
    By dmalbone in forum Around The Farm
    Replies: 23
    Last Post: May. 29, 2009, 05:46 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •