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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov. 13, 2011
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    Question Breeding to "calm her down"

    That was the reasoning behind this post

    http://ic.pics.livejournal.com/tiki_.../17966_900.jpg
    Which made its way from a FB page to a bad_riding blog and then back to a Snarky FB page where the teen responsible for posting it made a point of calling all her friends and make vague internet threats and then her mother ( i think) and employer, who i believe is in charge of this breeding and training facility:
    http://www.aubreyhill.com/our-staff/

    All interwebz drama aside, how common is this notion of breeding mares to calm them down in the U.S.?
    And btw, does anyone here know more about this equestrian center?
    Yes, I smell like a horse. No, I don't consider that to be a problem.

    Quote Originally Posted by DottieHQ View Post
    You're just jealous because you lack my extensive koalafications.



  2. #2
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    Oct. 27, 2009
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    Default

    I don't know how prevalent it is amongst horse people at large. I think it goes without saying that the only people who have this notion are people who have no knowledge and no business breeding horses.


    9 members found this post helpful.

  3. #3
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    Nov. 1, 2007
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    ....in a classroom in Fl, by the ocean
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    Having worked on a large Standardbred breeding farm and smaller operations, I can assure you that the foals take on their mother's personality more times than not. At the STB farm there was a saying....70% mare 30% stallion.


    3 members found this post helpful.

  4. #4
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    Aug. 25, 2005
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    Northeast
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    It sounds like a really bad idea. As mentioned before, the mom seems to pass on her personality traits (I wonder why)-should those foals be weaned at birth?
    Some riders change their horse, they change their saddle, they change their teacher; they never change themselves.


    3 members found this post helpful.

  5. #5
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    May. 23, 2013
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    664

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    We have a paint mare at my barn who was mellow until they bred her. Now she is a *B* and has to be on raspberry leaves and they have tried other things to chill her out as well. I wouldn't count on it calming a mare down, at all. I know having babies did not make me any more relaxed and chipper. In fact I never had a cramp in my life until after having a baby.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  6. #6
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    Mar. 8, 2004
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    Baltimore, MD
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    You generally end up with two that need calming.


    8 members found this post helpful.

  7. #7
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    Nov. 1, 2007
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    because its a watched/learned behavior. They did a study on it ages ago on the wild pony herd at New Bolton, but I have watched it first hand. (that is what happens when you have 400 head of broodmares).

    'A' mare bosses around 'B' mare and the others, mare 'A's foal watches and sees 'B' mare back down. Mare 'B's foal backs down as well because she moves with her mother. Mare 'A's foal learns how to push the other horses around (and by push I don't mean like being pushy, just learns how to communicate like her mother).

    Does this make sense, I am tired and may have been a bit vague.


    Quote Originally Posted by merrygoround View Post
    It sounds like a really bad idea. As mentioned before, the mom seems to pass on her personality traits (I wonder why)-should those foals be weaned at birth?


    3 members found this post helpful.

  8. #8
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    Feb. 1, 2008
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    Nowhere, Maryland
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    Default

    It does work (temporarily) with some mares. That's why giving Regumate or Depo can help to improve a mare's rideability/ temperament. Obviously it's a stupid non- solution to actually breed the mare.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  9. #9
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    Sep. 4, 2012
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    Southeast US
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    For some mares, breeding them can improve their disposition. I had my best riding seasons with my mare when she was bred. She was much more cooperative and easier to deal with.

    No, that wasn't why she was bred, it was simply a much appreciated side effect.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  10. #10
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    Aug. 9, 2007
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    Quote Originally Posted by RedmondDressage View Post
    I don't know how prevalent it is amongst horse people at large. I think it goes without saying that the only people who have this notion are people who have no knowledge and no business breeding horses.
    I totally agree with Redmond. It's a dumb thing to do: to breed a mare to "calm her down?" When I bought my very hot TB mare Callie, she'd had 6 foals after her 3 yrs on the track. She was hot, and I loved her for that. I'd always thought growing up that breeding a mare would ruin her spirit. Not my total of 3 ottbs, all mares. Now I have a 14 yr old ATA, whose former owner tried to breed her to her stud. Hattie resisted, and her owner ended up with a huge vet bill for a leg injury. She's still hot, and won't be having a foal although she and Cloudy have been trying to have one for over 5 yrs. I would never breed one of my mares. (Cloudy is not supposed to be a stud still.) People who buy TB mares and trakehner mares need to love hot horses or else buy something calmer.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  11. #11
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    Dec. 19, 2005
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    Quote Originally Posted by NoSuchPerson View Post
    For some mares, breeding them can improve their disposition. I had my best riding seasons with my mare when she was bred. She was much more cooperative and easier to deal with.

    No, that wasn't why she was bred, it was simply a much appreciated side effect.

    I have a mare who was a good race mare, is easy to live with but can be a bit of a hot and bothered sort of girl about a few specific things. Those issues melt away when she is in foal heck even around foals. She LOVES babies and wants nothing more then to be a mother. Its what she is best at , raises good tractable foals with out any issues and does not exhibit any of her worried behavior around them. So for her breeding her does change her behavior/personality. However the issues she has when shes open are not unmanageable or dangerous.
    "I would not beleive her if her tongue came notorized"



  12. #12
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    Nov. 17, 2013
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    Quote Originally Posted by MunchingonHay View Post
    70% mare 30% stallion.
    Agreed. I have never understood people who can't handle the mare, why would you want her offspring...


    5 members found this post helpful.

  13. #13
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    Dec. 7, 2009
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    Maryland
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    Even more important, why would you bred a mare that's so hard to handle? Aren't there enough unwanted horses in the world? Breeding should be done by people who have an idea what they're doing. There's no reason to thing about continuing her difficult personality on for another generation. I'm so tired of people thinking you should breed a mare if you can't ride it because it's crazy or unable to stay sound.


    3 members found this post helpful.

  14. #14
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    Sep. 8, 2011
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    Just point out the obvious here, but not ALL mares that are hard to handle are that way genetically. I had a mare who was very reactive who had two very mellow foals. The mare herself had been pushed as a 2-3 year old and was a nervous wreck, but she didn't pass it. And yes, breeding her did calm her down. She had an air that I called her "Hippy Hum" (sort of dazed and stoned) while she was actually pregnant, and each of the 2 pregnancies toned her down a little.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  15. #15
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    May. 25, 2009
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    Branson
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    Quote Originally Posted by MunchingonHay View Post
    because its a watched/learned behavior. They did a study on it ages ago on the wild pony herd at New Bolton, but I have watched it first hand. (that is what happens when you have 400 head of broodmares).

    'A' mare bosses around 'B' mare and the others, mare 'A's foal watches and sees 'B' mare back down. Mare 'B's foal backs down as well because she moves with her mother. Mare 'A's foal learns how to push the other horses around (and by push I don't mean like being pushy, just learns how to communicate like her mother).

    Does this make sense, I am tired and may have been a bit vague.
    It makes sense, but I disagree. Environmental factors can play a part, but I subscribe to the theory that mtDNA plays a much greater part in the greater influence by the mare than observation of the mare's behaviors.

    As to breeding a mare to settle her down, there is little question that works with SOME mares, but in and of itself it is, IMO, no justification to breed unless it is followed by lute. Breeding should be planned - not done for some knee jerk reason...


    4 members found this post helpful.

  16. #16
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    Mar. 27, 2009
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    Upstate NY
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    Sounds like magical thinking which gives the beleiver a "reason" to breed when there isn't a good reason to otherwise.
    Trainer's website - photos of my horse Airborne under About and Francesca Edwards also in media page 1

    http://www.patricianorciadressage.com/


    3 members found this post helpful.

  17. #17
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    Dec. 21, 2008
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    I remember hearing this notion way back when I was a kid/ teen. It was expressed by people who had no experience and those who tried it quickly found out that it doesn't work.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  18. #18
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    Mar. 30, 2012
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    Know that place and dear lord my opinion just greatly changed about them.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  19. #19
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    Nov. 1, 2007
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    perhaps, I worked on one of the largest STB farms in PA. Its is no longer operational unfortunately. We had 400 head of mares and foals by their sides in herds of 20-30 out in huge fields. You could tell what yearling was what mare's when it came into the barn for sale prep just by their temperament and how they treated their herd mates.

    Quote Originally Posted by Faceman View Post
    It makes sense, but I disagree. Environmental factors can play a part, but I subscribe to the theory that mtDNA plays a much greater part in the greater influence by the mare than observation of the mare's behaviors.

    As to breeding a mare to settle her down, there is little question that works with SOME mares, but in and of itself it is, IMO, no justification to breed unless it is followed by lute. Breeding should be planned - not done for some knee jerk reason...



  20. #20
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    Jan. 24, 2011
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    Midwest
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    Not worth the possibility of bringing another hot horse into the world to me.

    Stellar bloodlines/useability maybe would sway me....but for just a horse? No.



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