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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr. 5, 2007
    Posts
    42

    Default Managing the Ulcer Prone Horse

    My gelding has recently shown some signs of ulcers. Vet didn't feel the need to scope at this time. She prescribed ranitidine three times a day. This is day 3 and he's already more comfortable. Ricky has plentiful turn out on grass pastures, free choice hay when stalled, eats a ration balancer. Only supplement is magnesium and salt. He is ridden 4 days a week weather permitting. Been in dressage training and the last few lessons seem to have been more demanding physically and mentally. He is a worrier. 8 years old. Wondering if there is something I'm missing or some supplement I can include in his management to create a more comfortable gut.



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr. 15, 2011
    Posts
    448

    Default

    I'm reading great things about "blue pop rocks" both as treatment and effective prevention of ulcers. There are a lot of good threads about this. Also, some folks say adding UGARD pellets or NeighLox to feed once a day helps as an antacid.



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun. 4, 2001
    Location
    NW Louisiana
    Posts
    683

    Default

    My TB at the track is on aloe vera gel, about 30 cc, and that seems to be taking care of his suspected ulcer start. The trainer gets it at the healthfood store in gallon jugs by the case, all of his horses are on it.



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb. 25, 2012
    Location
    Montana
    Posts
    2,855

    Default

    My horse, who was scoped, did well on ranitadine and was on it for a long time (all those pills diluted in water, added to his feed!!). My vet also recommended he get fed four times a day, so he gets his food over many meals,rather than two feedings. Horses are foragers anyway. Some people also say alfalfa hay provides some buffering protection (didn't help him he colicked in both that and beet pulp) but I think for many alfalfa is recommended and evidence suggests that it offers good effect. Good luck!!!



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb. 1, 2012
    Location
    Vermont
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    5,389

    Default

    I recommend purchasing the "blue pop rocks", which are simply omeprazole (the active ingredient in GastroGard, but its MUCH cheaper).

    http://www.abler.com/products/Abprazole

    To treat a horse with ulcers, you would feed 3 packets per day for 30 days, for a 1000 pound horse. These 3 packets would be fed at the same time (i.e. with dinner every day). Much easier than Ranitidine three times a day, and the pop rocks are easier ingested because the horse barely knows they exist. THey are the size of cupcake sprinkles. It essentially costs $175 to treat a horse for a month, versus upwards of $900 if you buy GastroGard here.

    THe preventative dose is 1 packet per day.

    Alfalfa is good

    Vets usually recommend NeighLox for a supplement, my mare is on this now. I'm not sure if you saw the "Ulcers & Bots" thread on here, but there is a lot of info regarding care for the horse with ulcers.
    "If you think nobody cares about you, try missing a couple payments..."



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb. 1, 2012
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    Vermont
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    5,389

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by jbonifas View Post
    My TB at the track is on aloe vera gel, about 30 cc, and that seems to be taking care of his suspected ulcer start. The trainer gets it at the healthfood store in gallon jugs by the case, all of his horses are on it.
    Keep in mind that while aloe helps heal, it won't "heal" the ulcers unless management style changes are incorporated (forage 24/7, preventative during times of stress such as UlcerGard or the pop rocks, etc). A lot of things on the market or that are "recommended" don't create a healing environment for the ulcers like Omeprazole, and simply cover or mask the symptoms because they make the horse feel a little better.

    IMO, its better to use the medication to supress acid production, let those ulcers heal, and then use preventative maintenance to keep them from coming back.
    "If you think nobody cares about you, try missing a couple payments..."



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb. 1, 2012
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    Vermont
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    Default

    And even if aloe does help heal, its goign to take a whole lot longer than using Omeprazole.
    "If you think nobody cares about you, try missing a couple payments..."



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb. 1, 2012
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    Vermont
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    Default

    http://www.ker.com/library/advances/246.pdf

    Forage orage Buffering Capacity Relevant in Gastric Ulcer Prevention - http://www.ker.com/library/equinews/v11n3/v11n312.pdf

    Gastric Ulcers, Neigh-Lox, and the Racehorse - http://www.ker.com/library/EquineRev...hLine/HL05.pdf

    NeighLox should be fed twice a day to be most effective. They recommend 2 to 4 ounces twice a day. the 4 ounce rate will act effectively to buffer acid for up to 6 hours.
    "If you think nobody cares about you, try missing a couple payments..."



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar. 27, 2011
    Location
    SW Ontario
    Posts
    219

    Default

    My 15yo OTTB gelding just started UGard pellets as maintenance after a 2-month course of omeprazole. During the few days' lag between the omeprazole and UGard he stopped finishing his grain again, but he's right back into it after a few days on the UGard. It has an alfalfa base.



  10. #10
    Join Date
    May. 6, 2006
    Location
    Warren County, NJ
    Posts
    3,611

    Default

    Somewhere I read that FOS (fructooligosaccharides), as in prebiotic, were found to lower the acidity of the stomach & gut. (i'll try to find back to article)
    So adding a supplement with FOS or adding pure FOS might be beneficial



  11. #11
    Join Date
    May. 6, 2006
    Location
    Warren County, NJ
    Posts
    3,611

    Default

    Ah found it back, sorry it's the fecal PH that's altered, hence one could assume gut ph & perhaps even stomach ph gets altered as a result of adding FOS
    I read it here :
    http://www.gtcnutrition.com/EN/4dm1n...tifeed-188.pdf
    and I think the study they are referring to is this one
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15956463

    Other great info to be found here.
    http://www.lunatunesfreestyles.com/horse_ulcers.htm

    Free choice hay (with some added alfalfa) would be high on my list, a supplement containing l-glutamine (and l-threonine) can help heal stomach & gut lining.
    And as already posted consider omeprazole to speed up healing.

    Else I'm also learning as I walk the path .



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Feb. 1, 2012
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    Default

    I agree with adding Omeprazole to speed up healing. I suggest the "blue pop rocks" as referenced in other threads. Its the same thing as GastroGard paste, just in a granule, and MUCH MUCH MUCH cheaper.

    GastroGard = $35.00 for 1 tube, therefore $35.00 per day to treat

    "pop rocks" = $1.75 per packet, 3 packets treats 1000 lb horse, therefore $5.25 per day to treat.

    I saw positive results with my mare with the Pop rocks. I initially treated with GastroGard because I didn''t have pop rocks on hand. Finished course of GG paste ($850 later), and after she was off it for a few days she started eating less of her meals. I added 1 packet of pop rocks daily with her dinner, after two days she is back to eating all her food and drinking regularly.
    "If you think nobody cares about you, try missing a couple payments..."



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