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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun. 21, 2010
    Location
    DeLeon Springs, Fl
    Posts
    5

    Default Have things changed- This used to be a nono.. Gate on BACK side of triple bar oxer

    Back in the day, it used to be a nono. I was telling a FB friend who runs a horse show, that the triple bar should NOT have a gate on the BACK of the third rail. And the ground line is underneath the front rail... not pushed out to the front standard's feet. Things change? I was always taught this was dangerous.
    https://fbcdn-sphotos-a.akamaihd.net...43568402_n.jpg



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb. 18, 2001
    Location
    New York, NY
    Posts
    6,986

    Default

    No, that's still not acceptable and you won't see it at big shows.

    Don't assume that something is now standard practice just because you've seen it once at what looks to be a schooling/local show. I think a lot of trainers would have said something if they saw that in the show ring.



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan. 25, 2009
    Location
    Rock Chalk!
    Posts
    3,162

    Default

    The ground line is fine. As long as it isn't behind the first rail, it's ok. The only reason to push it out more is to help the horse jump better. Jumpers often don't use ground lines at all.

    JP123 3. A solid element (i.e., coop, wall, etc.) may not be used as part of the further-most element. Only straight rails (not curved), may be used on the back of spread obstacles. Only a single rail may beused on the middle or back of a spread unless the lack of a second rail would leave an excessive
    gap between the top of the front element and later elements. Standards in which the rail rests on the top of the post are prohibited.

    I guess they could've felt that there was an excessive gap...
    A proud friend of bar.ka.



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb. 3, 2000
    Location
    Nokesville, VA
    Posts
    35,434

    Default

    Assuming you are talking about jumpers
    JP123 Spread Obstacles .
    1. Definition. A spread obstacle is an oxer, a triple bar, Liverpool, or a water jump with a width
    dimension. All courses require a minimum of three obstacles in which the spread exceeds the
    height by 5 cm (2”) up to 15 cm (6”). (Exception: Puissance, Six Bars and special classes.) Refer
    to JP122.7 for required number of spreads.
    2. Measurement. Spread obstacles are measured from their two outermost top extremities on a
    line parallel to the ground.
    3. A solid element (i.e., coop, wall, etc.) may not be used as part of the further-most element. Only
    straight rails (not curved), may be used on the back of spread obstacles. Only a single rail may be
    used on the middle or back of a spread unless the lack of a second rail would leave an excessive
    gap between the top of the front element and later elements. Standards in which the rail rests on
    the top of the post are prohibited.
    Even if they thought there was an "excessive gap" they could only add a second rail, not a gate.

    Usually, jumper courses don't HAVE groundlines. The only rules about groundlines ON course are about wter jumps. The rest of the ground line rules apply to the schooling ring.
    Appendix A 11. Ground lines are not mandatory, however if they are used they must be placed either directly
    below the front of the jump or up to 1 m (3’3”) out. If a ground line is used on the landing side of
    a jump, there must be one on the take off side, and it may not be any further out than the one on
    the take off side. If an oxer is flagged so it may only be jumped in one direction, the ground line is
    only permitted on the front of the oxer.
    Janet

    chief feeder and mucker for Music, Spy, Belle and Tiara. Someone else is now feeding and mucking for Chief and Brain (both foxhunting now).



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec. 7, 2006
    Posts
    867

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Janet View Post
    Usually, jumper courses don't HAVE groundlines.
    A lot of times course designers like to make the first fence on course inviting. This usually means something with a ground line.



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb. 3, 2000
    Location
    Nokesville, VA
    Posts
    35,434

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Ravencrest_Camp View Post
    A lot of times course designers like to make the first fence on course inviting. This usually means something with a ground line.
    That is why I said "usually".
    Janet

    chief feeder and mucker for Music, Spy, Belle and Tiara. Someone else is now feeding and mucking for Chief and Brain (both foxhunting now).



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul. 2, 2003
    Location
    Woodland, Ca
    Posts
    6,275

    Default

    Nope, not o.k. and the judge should have said something even if none of the trainers objected.



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov. 15, 1999
    Location
    Middleburg VA and Southampton NY
    Posts
    6,200

    Default

    That is a very badly built obstacle that should not be jumped.



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