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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun. 16, 2006
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    SE Coastal NC
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    1,708

    Default Track wraps vs. stable/standing wraps?

    Hi all -

    I'm using standing wraps on my horse for a tendon injury and needed an extra set of wraps to keep me from doing laundry so often! I ordered a set of "Centaur standing wraps" from SmartPak. Unfortunately, they are a more stretchy and more slick type material and don't seem to stay put over the quilts overnight when my horse lays down in his stall. They haven't come off but they bunch up on the bottom and expose the quilt. I thought maybe I hadn't wrapped them tight enough but wrapping tighter didn't seem to help either.

    My old pair of wraps don't do this and also don't have the same type of stretch to them that these do. Could my old wraps actually be "track" wraps instead of "standing" wraps? Is there a difference or does it just vary from brand to brand? I need wraps without the stretch!

    Thanks for the help!
    "Farming looks mighty easy when your plow is a pencil, and you're a thousand miles from the corn field." --Dwight D Eisenhower

    Boston Terrier Rescue of NC - www.btrnc.org - Adopt for Life!



  2. #2
    Join Date
    May. 11, 2009
    Location
    Dairyville USA
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    2,979

    Default

    I prefer these track bandages. I've never had a problem with them slipping that couldn't be attributed to either improper wrapping technique or the horse chewing on them (thanks Treasure! lol. He gets Bitter Apple spray now) I am not a fan of "flannels", fleece polos, or "stable/standing" over wrap and in my area of the world "standing wraps" refers to the entire bandage (quilt/pillow and overwrap.) I do understand that in many catalogues, some disciplines, and some areas of the country the "standing wrap" means just the overwrap
    Michael: Seems the people who burned me want me for a job.
    Sam: A job? Does it pay?
    Michael: Nah, it's more of a "we'll kill you if you don't do it" type of thing.
    Sam: Oh. I've never liked those.



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun. 16, 2006
    Location
    SE Coastal NC
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    Default

    Thanks Grataan! I too consider the entire wrap as the "standing wrap" and would consider the overwrap to be more like the stable bandage I see listed. So the differences in terminology really confused me when I started looking at different catalogues/websites. I'll check out the ones you mentioned. I really don't want to spend $20 on another set of wraps that turn out to be the stretchy type again, so I was hoping someone could vouch for a particular set before I bought them
    "Farming looks mighty easy when your plow is a pencil, and you're a thousand miles from the corn field." --Dwight D Eisenhower

    Boston Terrier Rescue of NC - www.btrnc.org - Adopt for Life!



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar. 8, 2004
    Location
    Baltimore, MD
    Posts
    20,165

    Default

    Well as someone who has been on the track for 20 years, I have no idea what a track bandage is so I can't really answer your question. I looked up the bandages you have and they look like standing bandages to me. To wrap you hold the end with your left hand and take all the tension out by pulling it taut and wrapping evenly the whole way around.

    The cotton wraps to me are what I would term cold water bandages. The stretchy Saratoga bandages are sort of like polos. Neither of which are designed to be used as standing bandages but either could probably do the job if wrapped correctly.



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun. 16, 2006
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    SE Coastal NC
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    Default

    Ok so maybe the "track" bandage and "stable" bandage are actually the same wrap - but just called by more than one name in the catalogues. Perhaps that Centaur wrap I have just has more give to it than other brands might. They're not stretchy like polos but they just don't stay put. The older set of bandages I have look the same but have NO give to them and don't have any sheen to the fabric like these to. They don't move an inch when I put them on. I wish I could remember where I ordered them from!
    "Farming looks mighty easy when your plow is a pencil, and you're a thousand miles from the corn field." --Dwight D Eisenhower

    Boston Terrier Rescue of NC - www.btrnc.org - Adopt for Life!



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov. 8, 2006
    Posts
    2,446

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by SkipHiLad4me View Post
    Ok so maybe the "track" bandage and "stable" bandage are actually the same wrap - but just called by more than one name in the catalogues. Perhaps that Centaur wrap I have just has more give to it than other brands might. They're not stretchy like polos but they just don't stay put. The older set of bandages I have look the same but have NO give to them and don't have any sheen to the fabric like these to. They don't move an inch when I put them on. I wish I could remember where I ordered them from!
    No, they are distinctly different. Track: cotton. Stable: polyester.

    Wash your wraps in oxiclean (or biz or borax) then send them through the dryer on medium. If that doesn't fix it reevaluate if you are wrapping slightly differently. I own about 2 dozen centaur wraps and never had one slip (and I wrap very loose).



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb. 7, 2005
    Location
    Eventing Heaven, VA
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    1,877

    Default

    I've had the same two sets of Toklat standing bandages for years. They are the polyester double-knit, so they have some stretch but not much. The sets I have are probably 6" wide and one is 9' long, the other 12'. I've used them over thicker pillow wraps and no bow wraps, and seldom if ever had a problem with them slipping. I'll probably get nailed for this, but I have even turned out with them to cover a wound, with a spiral of duct tape covering the velcro.

    I've never liked the cotton 'track' wraps, as they do not seem to stretch evenly over time, and they are too narrow for my preference. That is merely my opinion and experience, to be taken or ignored as desired.
    Failure is always an option*
    -Mythbusters

    *As long as you figure out what you f'ed up and fix it! -Me



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun. 16, 2006
    Location
    SE Coastal NC
    Posts
    1,708

    Default

    flyracing - I'll give that a try. I've only washed these once so maybe they just need some more wear and tear like my old ones.

    Thanks for the input everyone.
    "Farming looks mighty easy when your plow is a pencil, and you're a thousand miles from the corn field." --Dwight D Eisenhower

    Boston Terrier Rescue of NC - www.btrnc.org - Adopt for Life!



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Oct. 26, 2007
    Location
    Boston MA
    Posts
    650

    Default

    They are completely different. Track bandages are around 3-4" wide and stretchy cotton knit. Stable or standing bandgaes are around 6" wide and have no stretch to them. http://www.smartpakequine.com/centau...x?cm_vc=Search
    I use the ones above and have never had them slip. You need to use adequate tension to keep them in place, it is a tighter wrap than a polo.



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Feb. 22, 2011
    Posts
    94

    Default

    Although I've done it, I HATE doing standing wraps with a track wrap. It's too narrow and has too much give. I do my standing wraps with what's usually called a standing wrap or what I call nylons (to go over quilts). It's about 1-2" wider than a polo or track wrap and has much less give. I have both 9' (Jack's MFG) and 12' (Equine Textiles) lengths. I like the 9's best for quick wraps, but I feel better about leaving the 12's on overnight because my horse has freakishly long back legs (think XL size boots). The Equine Textiles one seem to be made out of a thinner nylon, but they both wrap the same and I'm happy with both brands. I've had my Jack's ones for 7+ years now and they still look new other than some fading on the color of the velcro.

    If you're really frustrated and have some money to blow, you can't go wrong with vetrap. On a "normal" wrap (no joints involved) it gives the perfect tension every time and is beyond easy to wrap. I've also found that it's harder for the horse to destroy.



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