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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep. 16, 1999
    Posts
    831

    Question Cleats on trailer ramps

    I am thinking about adding cleats to the ramp of my horse trailer (Kingstson, goose-neck, 2-horse, slant load) and would very much appreciate any opinions on the pro's and cons of ramp cleats.

    The ramp currently is lined by the manufacturer-installed rubber matting that also lines the trailer floor. The matting on the ramp becomes a little slippery when wet, hence my interest in adding cleats.

    The trailer dealer who would install the cleats (and is very good), recommends using strips of Rumber.

    Any thoughts or experiences on trailer ramp cleats? Is there any "set formula" for how widely they should be spaced? Anything else that I should consider with them?

    Thanks so much! WJ



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb. 16, 2003
    Location
    MI USA
    Posts
    7,431

    Default

    We have cleats on all our ramps, to provide traction if ramp should be the least bit damp. Some days it is raining when you need to haul someplace!
    Cleats provide horses the security of good grip, limited slip if ramp is wet.

    Husband put our cleats on, they are about 14 inches apart, only on the center of the ramp. 2" wide, about 1" thick, screwed to the ramp over the rubber or wood lining of the ramps. We have several trailers, with varioius surfaces on the ramps.

    We have never used rumbar, can't say anything about it for cleat use. But being plastic, it might shatter if hit wrong. Do get the corner edges on top rounded off. A 90* angle can be quite sharp if you slide into it.

    Our strips of wood have the sharp corner edges on top slightly rounded, so they are not sharp. We use the wood because it is easy to work with. Cheap to cut those small strips if they need replacing. And wood provides grip to the studded shoes ALL the time. If the studs should tear up the strips, we remove it and put on another strip of wood.

    Horses wear road studs in their shoes so they have grip on all normal working surfaces, doesn't protrude very far below the metal shoe. Sometimes the horse going in or out of the trailer will step on the cleats, instead of between them. Stud will put a little dent in the wood, and with many dents in the wood, they may need to be replaced now and again.

    I would totally agree with your needing cleats on the ramp. Even ONE slip on a wet ramp is TOO MANY. One of ours slid out backwards, foggy morning got the ramp damp. We had cleats on that afternoon, no more slips for anyone. They all load and unload well, so we want to keep it that way, without avoidable injuries that cleats can prevent.



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec. 21, 2010
    Posts
    580

    Default

    Rumber is RUBBER, not plastic. Very tough and long lasting, can flex, can have edges rounded, etc.

    chicamux



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb. 16, 2003
    Location
    MI USA
    Posts
    7,431

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by chicamux View Post
    Rumber is RUBBER, not plastic. Very tough and long lasting, can flex, can have edges rounded, etc.

    chicamux
    Thanks for that. I thought it was one of the synthetic woods, like Trex.



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