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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb. 22, 2009
    Location
    Wisconsin
    Posts
    2,665

    Default The joys of explaining things. Thanks everyone

    Thanks all. Glad to see that everyone agrees on here on this situation So we shall see what happens.
    Last edited by Couture TB; Feb. 19, 2012 at 11:31 AM.



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov. 26, 2001
    Location
    Nashville, TN USA
    Posts
    1,174

    Default

    Explain it as a person who can go barefoot on rocks with no problem whereas others cannot go barefoot at all due to sensitivity issues------pain. Me.



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan. 4, 2007
    Location
    TX
    Posts
    40,845

    Default

    Maybe have them talk to their vet about this?
    Last edited by Bluey; Feb. 19, 2012 at 11:18 AM.



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr. 10, 2006
    Posts
    7,354

    Default

    Maybe it's not the right buyer for the horse.....?
    We couldn't all be cowboys, so some of us are clowns.



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar. 10, 2006
    Location
    Albany NY
    Posts
    5,490

    Default

    You say "Now, some horses can go barefoot, but this guy needs shoes because his soles are thin and he can go lame quickly from stone bruises without them, so you need to keep him shod. As long as he is shod, he is fine. Do you have a good farrier? If not, I suggest you keep my farrier for a while so you can learn what he needs. He can't go barefoot."

    I too have seen people riding barefoot horses who are mincing, stone bruised and lame, or they are nursing absesses two seasons out of the year, saying that very thing: Shoing makes my horse lame. Sad.
    Airborne? Oh. Yes, he can take a joke. Once. After that, the joke's on you.



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun. 1, 2002
    Location
    Indiana
    Posts
    11,131

    Default

    I'd explain it to the trainer because people like this shouldn't be shopping alone.



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr. 28, 2006
    Posts
    1,621

    Default

    Tell them to bring the horse back from the trial, that he doesn't sound like the right match for them... I would ask them what book they are using to learn how to buy a horse?



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep. 7, 2009
    Location
    Lexington, KY
    Posts
    17,780

    Default

    I agree...bring him back from the trial. Refund any money. I'm sure the horse would thank you if he could.
    "We can judge the heart of a man by his treatment of animals." ~Immanuel Kant



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Oct. 14, 2010
    Location
    Horse Heaven
    Posts
    1,892

    Default

    Are buyers like this (wanting to do it all by themselves but complete newbies) among the most PITA? I would worry this type of buyer will be the one to cry the loudest and hardest when things go south because of their stupidity that gets blamed on all those trying to help them. And they are most likely to fall under the spell of the most hair-brained pseudo-horse gurus with crazy training and care ideas. Oh, so glad I am not a seller!! Best wishes getting this sale resolved for yourself and horse.



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Mar. 10, 2006
    Location
    Albany NY
    Posts
    5,490

    Default

    Bring him home, shoe him, and make sure he's sound before sending him out again.

    My horse tested positive behind when he was sold to his first trainer, but he was barefoot behind. He went on to another owner and was barefoot for a couple of years mostly pastured. He was ouchy when I got him, then I shod him and he's been sound as a dollar ever since. When I got him, his soles were flat, he had platter feet. Now his soles are concave and hard, but it is because he has been correctly shod for several years.

    Get the horse's feet in good shape and sell him at his best. You would be doing the horse a disservice to sell him to this yahoo, who apparently doesn't have the where withall to manage the horse correctly, and you would be doing the horse a disservice yoruself not to gethis feet in the best shape, ie shod, as you could before he went out.
    Airborne? Oh. Yes, he can take a joke. Once. After that, the joke's on you.



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Feb. 22, 2009
    Location
    Wisconsin
    Posts
    2,665

    Default

    It is not my horse so not my choice to bring him home or not. He is sound, they are still riding him while he is there and the little girl and him are a good fit. His feet are in good shape, but do require shoes for working on hard ground. It is up to my client to make a decision.



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