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  1. #1
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    Sep. 30, 2005
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    Default Polo wraps vs. standing wraps

    Please educate me on the difference between polo wraps and standing wraps. How are the two used differently?

    Which one is best when wrapping a leg to help reduce some minor swelling?

    Thank you in advance.



  2. #2
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    Jan. 16, 2002
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    Default

    There are all sorts of philosophies about this, but to answer your question, I generally consider polos as being either decorative or there to prevent minor bumps and bruises while working a horse.

    Standing bandages mean TO ME quilts and bandages put on a horse either for shipping or for standing in its stall, with the intention of a) preventing bangs and bruises and b) to minimize minor swelling and c) to maybe hold a poultice in place. I don't typically put bandages on a horse without quilts or pillow wraps and I'm not sure many others do, either. So that's MY definition of "standing bandages/wraps".

    If your goal is to minimize swelling, I'd go with standing wraps while the hors is confined to a stall or in a trailer. I would not use polos on a horse that isn't being ridden (actually I don't use them ever) and wouldn't put either one on a horse that was turned out.

    And for my money, ice or cold hosing beats bandages HANDS DOWN for preventing or treating minor swelling. But I do use standing wraps at shows since my horses are not used to being in stalls and can stock up a little bit when confined.
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  3. #3
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    Default

    Ditto what delta said.

    IMO, polos are quite useless, other than to offer some protection while being ridden.

    Standing wraps always have quilts/no-bows and then track bandages. This is what I use to reduce swelling/prevent stocking up/hauling/poulticing.

    I definitely wouldnt use polos to minimize swelling.
    Charlie Brown (1994 bay TB X gelding)
    White Star (2004 grey TB gelding)

    Mystical Moment, 1977-2010.



  4. #4
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by deltawave View Post
    There are all sorts of philosophies about this, but to answer your question, I generally consider polos as being either decorative or there to prevent minor bumps and bruises while working a horse.

    Standing bandages mean TO ME quilts and bandages put on a horse either for shipping or for standing in its stall, with the intention of a) preventing bangs and bruises and b) to minimize minor swelling and c) to maybe hold a poultice in place. I don't typically put bandages on a horse without quilts or pillow wraps and I'm not sure many others do, either. So that's MY definition of "standing bandages/wraps".

    If your goal is to minimize swelling, I'd go with standing wraps while the hors is confined to a stall or in a trailer. I would not use polos on a horse that isn't being ridden (actually I don't use them ever) and wouldn't put either one on a horse that was turned out.

    And for my money, ice or cold hosing beats bandages HANDS DOWN for preventing or treating minor swelling. But I do use standing wraps at shows since my horses are not used to being in stalls and can stock up a little bit when confined.
    ^^^This!

    And, remember if you only need to wrap 1 leg for bandage purposes, you should also use a standing wrap on the corrresponding leg for support. I.E. if the left hind must be wrapped, you should use a standing warp on the right hind as well. Personally, I wrap all 4 when one must be wrapped for all around support.

    I never use polo wraps alone...I'm not good at wrapping them, and a bad wrap can do more harm than good. I use the nylon track bandages over pillow wraps for standing wraps.
    "If you think nobody cares about you, try missing a couple payments..."



  5. #5
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    Nov. 27, 2011
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    Default

    A thick layer of non-medicated clay poultice under shop towel/newspaper, quilts and standing wraps would be my treatment for swelling (providing there are no cuts).

    Ditto what others have said re. uselessness of polo wraps for much except decoration.



  6. #6
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    Jan. 16, 2002
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    if the left hind must be wrapped, you should use a standing warp on the right hind as well
    See, here's where philosophies differ. If a horse is not LAME, and I only want to wrap one leg, I only wrap one leg. Wrapping the opposite leg serves no purpose at all if the horse isn't overly weighting the opposite leg (and even if it is, it's doubtful that makes any impact).

    But I do get it that horse people dislike asymmetry and it looks odd to have one leg wrapped. I'm comfortable with odd numbers.
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  7. #7
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    Feb. 3, 2000
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    Polo wraps are for decoration, and to protect the horse's leg from minor bumps- originally from the polo mallet or the ball, in other sports mostly for minor interference.

    If you want to reduce swelling you need standing bandages.

    My vet' preferred method for minor swelling is a furacin poltice

    smear the furacin on the leg
    cover with plastic wrap
    cover with quilt
    wrap with a bandage
    Janet

    chief feeder and mucker for Music, Spy, Belle and Tiara. Someone else is now feeding and mucking for Chief and Brain (both foxhunting now).



  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by SuckerForHorses View Post
    And, remember if you only need to wrap 1 leg for bandage purposes, you should also use a standing wrap on the corrresponding leg for support. I.E. if the left hind must be wrapped, you should use a standing warp on the right hind as well. Personally, I wrap all 4 when one must be wrapped for all around support.

    This USED to be the "received wisdom" but it is my understanding that scientific studies have more recently shown that it doesn't make any difference.

    If you want to wrap the other leg(s) for aesthetic reasons, go ahead, but it is not veterinarily needed.
    Janet

    chief feeder and mucker for Music, Spy, Belle and Tiara. Someone else is now feeding and mucking for Chief and Brain (both foxhunting now).



  9. #9
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    Well, that's why I didn't say "you mustwrap the other leg"
    "If you think nobody cares about you, try missing a couple payments..."



  10. #10
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    Dec. 13, 1999
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    Ditto everything DW said, including whether to wrap the other leg or not

    I know some people do, but *I* would never, not in a million years, leave polos on unattanded.
    ______________________________
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  11. #11
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    My mare was just wrapped for six weeks, left hind, hoof to hip, rewrapped every 3 days. OMG I would've died if I had to wrap the other hind too! I used to subscribe to that philosophy but... this round killed that pretty quickly!



  12. #12
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    LOL Jo, if you'd "had" to wrap the other leg, you'd have only need to do a basic standing wrap
    ______________________________
    The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances. - ET



  13. #13
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    Well - that is true - but still, it would've been a pain!!!



  14. #14
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    Oct. 4, 2003
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    Default

    I'm just going to say here... If you don't know the difference between a polo wrap and a standing wrap, please do not apply either one without instruction/input from somebody who does.

    Polo bandages are not just for decoration. They are for protection, from brushing, from run down, from speedy cutting, from blows from other legs or obsticles. Correctly applied, they do not shift, even under speed conditions. They protect fully, all the way round the leg, from under the ankle to under the knee. But they are not standing wraps.

    Standing wraps can be of various material, over padding. If you have not used them before, the non stretch cotton flannel ones tend to do the least damage if you are inexperienced at applying them. The stretchy ones are OK if you are secure in the knowledge of how they should be applied, not too tight, not too loose. Standing wraps are used to supply warmth to the lower legs, to increase circulation through that warmth, as well as protection and/or holding treatments on the leg.


    PS. The "minor swelling" is telling you something. You can apply pressure to it, and it might go away, but it is still telling you the same thing. There is an injury. Making the swelling go away does not cure the injury. Time cures the injury, healing cures the injury. Warmth, circulation of blood, helps to cure the injury, but it still needs time. Make sure you know the nature of the injury, and what it will require to aid it's healing.



  15. #15
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    Oct. 15, 2010
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Janet View Post
    Polo wraps are for decoration, and to protect the horse's leg from minor bumps- originally from the polo mallet or the ball, in other sports mostly for minor interference.

    If you want to reduce swelling you need standing bandages.

    My vet' preferred method for minor swelling is a furacin poltice

    smear the furacin on the leg
    cover with plastic wrap
    cover with quilt
    wrap with a bandage
    Ditto.



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