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  1. #21
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    Jul. 17, 2008
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    The Beach, Maryland
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    If I was you, when first going out there knowing that this pony hadn't been worked with in a while, I definitely would've started out not riding the first time, but doing the lunging/groundwork as other posters previously suggested.

    You need to get to know the new horse and what tricks he may try to pull, and I think better to see that on the ground than on his back.

    Once you do get on him, start slow, especially if his steering isn't so hot. Just walk and work on transitions, circles, figure 8's anything to make him think and focus on you and what YOU want to do.

    You pretty much just have to start all over again with him and hopefully get him out of his tricks. If when you do get on he does try to pull some crap, get after him and show him that it is not acceptable anymore.
    Friend of bar.ka!
    Quote Originally Posted by MHM View Post
    GM quote of the day, regarding the correct way to do things:
    "There's correct, and then there's correct. If you're almost correct, that means you're wrong."



  2. #22
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    Jul. 27, 2005
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    Chapel Hill, NC
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    Quote Originally Posted by 2tempe View Post
    We don't get "less brave" by the way - we get a bigger sense of self preservation!!
    I think this has to be one of the best things I have ever read on COTH. Love it!!
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  3. #23
    Join Date
    Mar. 25, 2011
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    Pennsylvania
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    Holy crap! And you got on a second time? Why? He is not your problem.

    JMO
    Paula
    He is total garbage! Quick! Hide him on my trailer (Petstorejunkie).



  4. #24
    Join Date
    Jan. 31, 2003
    Posts
    18,472

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    To answer your question, yes, it is dangerous.

    If you arent a trainer, its not your problem (shrug). I would decline to fix her horse for free.
    "Kindness is free" ~ Eurofoal
    ---
    The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances.



  5. #25
    Join Date
    Mar. 25, 2011
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    Pennsylvania
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    Indeed! What happens when he injures you?

    Paula
    He is total garbage! Quick! Hide him on my trailer (Petstorejunkie).



  6. #26
    Join Date
    Jun. 21, 2010
    Location
    Sweden
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    460

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    Quote Originally Posted by 2tempe View Post
    We don't get "less brave" by the way - we get a bigger sense of self preservation!!


    I agree with the others, there are far to many wellmannered horses out there too waste time on crazy/nervous/illbehaved ones. Especially since falling off hurts much more now than 20 years ago... leave this to a pro to handle is my advice, especially since you feel afraid which the horse will pick up on.



  7. #27
    Join Date
    Jun. 17, 2001
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    down the road from bar.ka
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    Quote Originally Posted by Equilibrium View Post
    ....He WAS in a riding school and most of the time those horses are worth their weight in gold...
    Terri
    Or worth their weight in manure if they were allowed to perfect every fracking dirty trick in the book to disuade any rider from persuing any semblence of a decent ride. This should not be confused with "green".

    You CAN rehab (I actually did a few of these these as 6 month flips-they tend to be real cheap and out of condition because nobody wants to ride them) but not if they belong to somebody else, have other riders or only get worked a couple of days a week. They need boot camp- about 60 days of no nonsense, zero tolerance daily sessions until you break through and then frequent refreshers/reminders from any and all riders who must ALL be on the same page, ALL the time, EVERY ride.

    Anyway, does not sound inherently dangerous. Sounds like a pig who learned no is the best answer to rider commands and something that is no fun at all to work with. Smart little stinker, a master of evasion and changing the subject. The stupid ones never figure it out. It can be "unlearned" but only to a point, they will always test. And it takes time. Complicated by the fact it is 13 and the owner is a little less then confident on it.

    I can see why the owner feels that way and, frankly, you don't need the aggravation unless you insist on daily sessions (and have the time) and if you take it on?

    Send the owner a bill.

    Oh, disagree on the lunging. IME freshness and lack of basics is not the problem with these that have hundreds of miles giving lessons. No, they are very well educated and lunge like little darlings. Planning how they will deal with you when you get on. It has to be ridden out.

    You get something of unknown background and iffy training that just was never taught proper basics? Those you can get to by restarting on the lunge and ground driving. If that were the case with the OPs situation, yeah, you start over. But it still would need daily, consistent work on a regular schedual.

    I'd send the owner a bill for that too.
    Last edited by findeight; Feb. 16, 2012 at 10:16 AM.
    When opportunity knocks it's wearing overalls and looks like work.

    The horse world. Two people. Three opinions.



  8. #28
    Join Date
    Apr. 10, 2006
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    7,347

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    Walk away.

    There are lots of nice horses out there, why mess with one like this. Especially if you don't own it! Be thankful, it's not your problem!
    We couldn't all be cowboys, so some of us are clowns.



  9. #29
    Join Date
    Feb. 28, 2006
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    The rocky part of KY
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    Quote Originally Posted by findeight View Post
    Or worth their weight in manure if they were allowed to perfect every fracking dirty trick in the book to disuade any rider from persuing any semblence of a decent ride. Like this one has.

    You CAN rehab (I actually did a few of these these as 6 month flips-they tend to be real cheap and out of condition because nobody wants to ride them) but not if they belong to somebody else, have other riders or only get worked a couple of days a week. They need boot camp- about 60 days of no nonsense, zero tolerance daily sessions until you break through and then frequent refreshers/reminders from any and all riders who must ALL be on the same page, ALL the time, EVERY ride.

    Anyway, does not sound inherently dangerous. Sounds like a pig who learned no is the best answer to rider commands and something that is no fun at all to work with. Smart little stinker, a master of evasion and changing the subject. The stupid ones never figure it out. It can be "unlearned" but only to a point, they will always test. And it takes time.

    I can see why the owner does not want to fool with him and, frankly, you don't need the aggravation unless you insist on daily sessions (and have the time) and if you take it on?

    Send the owner a bill.

    Oh, disagree on the lunging. IME freshness and lack of basics is not the problem with these that have hundreds of miles giving lessons. No, they are very well educated and lunge like little darlings. Planning how they will deal with you when you get on. It has to be ridden out.

    You get something of unknown background and iffy training that just was never taught proper basics? Those you can get to by restarting on the lunge and ground driving.
    Oh, yes. This sounds like learned behavior to me, and why people call ponies evil. They're SMART, and can be calculating.

    IMO, if this were me, I would get off this one with no regrets. OP you aren't a coward or a poor rider, you are an ammy just like me who isn't getting paid to ride somebody's problem child.
    Courageous Weenie Eventer Wannabe
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  10. #30
    Join Date
    Oct. 13, 2008
    Posts
    151

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    Quote Originally Posted by islgrl View Post

    Moreover, it sounds like the owner is asking you to solve her problem. She may need to pay someone to do that.
    This is what I first thought too. It's not worth risking the confidence you do have (trust me-been there, done that). If you don't think you'll have the to give the corrections need, you'll only be doing yourself and the pony harm. Someone had also mentioned that this isn't the only opportunity you'll ever have to ride (agreed). Best of luck.



  11. #31
    Join Date
    Jul. 19, 2007
    Location
    Michigan
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    10,361

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    The spooking/running might be gone with longing and a strong seat. Bucking at canter transitions? One at the barn had developed a habit of that. When I was riding him last summer he tried it with me. Once. I scared the bejesus out of him and drove him on, and he didn't try that again with me. Trying to walk out of the ring and ignore commands also sounds less like rank and more like a bad habit developed as a school horse with riders who couldn't stop him.

    He's checking to see if he can buffalo you, too. Apparently, he can, and I don't blame you. (And why did the owner almost get run over? Get out of the way!) Tell the owner thanks but no thanks--she needs to *pay* a trainer or a pony jock to solve that kind of behavior. Not your job. You're riding for fun, so you should ride something fun.



  12. #32
    Join Date
    Oct. 4, 2003
    Location
    Clinton, BC
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    If it was something that intreged you, interested you, trying to solve this pony's problems, if it was something that you enjoyed doing, it would be worthwhile. But if you feel fear, this points to this not being the case. Find a nice horse to ride. Nice horses may be green, "nice" does not necessarily mean "broke to death", it means "nice". Horses who you enjoy, and enjoy their time with you. Especially if you are not being paid for your work.



  13. #33
    Join Date
    Mar. 1, 2004
    Location
    California
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    363

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    Heh well nothing you stated sounds like the end of the road yet for the little beastly pony. Sounds like escalation behavior after most likely buffalo BS he gave kids in lesson program. Initially when these past "lesson horses" come in they have a pretty high opinion of their evasions and when challenged offer colorful behavior.

    When we tackle a problem with clients weather they live at barn or trailer in it is always a little worse before better. To help the kids understand and be brave I tell it to them like this: Your horse/pony has had the most lenient most funny baby sitter ever and now a new nanny is in town and they will pull out all the stops because naughty behavior has worked in past.

    Now you may not be up or game (not that it is something most want to do, that is fix someone else's training neglect) and there is nothing wrong with you passing on this pony gone wild. Sounds like I would tackle him on the ground first, drive his little butt and then clear the ring for some good nanny like behavior which leaves him positive outs for good behavior. That is if he tries to meet you half way meet him and build from there!



  14. #34
    Join Date
    Jun. 17, 2001
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    down the road from bar.ka
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    They are called "Pony" because all the other 4 letter words were taken and a Pony is the only legal form of child abuse.

    Not their fault. Most are very smart and never get corrected for kid mistakes so they continue to assume they can get away with them and add more.

    Add to that the sad fact many school Ponies in programs don't get "tune ups" often or at all and learn all manner of evasions plus how to defend themselves against painful bad riding. Enough time goes by and they get to where you can't ever trust them.

    That spook/spin/bolt/into the wall slam can be perfected by horse or Pony that has had too many riders afraid of it-I ought to know. My good Hunter came with that installed courtesy of prior owner who dumped it in 6 months because she was afraid of it. Took alot of good Pro rides to get it manageable but it would sometimes surface-and not when it was fresh either. Never in the show ring either, always at home. Never figured that one out.

    Lunging won't help the cheater/evader who learned they could get away with it. They know exactly what they are doing.
    When opportunity knocks it's wearing overalls and looks like work.

    The horse world. Two people. Three opinions.



  15. #35
    Join Date
    Apr. 29, 2008
    Posts
    167

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    It sounds like you know you don't want to ride the pony but need some backup

    DON'T RIDE THE PONY! hehe It's clearly not worth it to you. You're not getting paid for training and you aren't having fun.

    I also second the hot/sensative vs naughty. I can ride hot horses all day long, but I don't ride a buck all that well and now that I have a herniated disk in my back it isn't worth it to me. Don't wait until you get injured to listen to your gut!



  16. #36
    Join Date
    Feb. 18, 2001
    Location
    New York, NY
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    6,850

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    Quote Originally Posted by meupatdoes View Post
    You do not owe it to the world, your colleague, or anything or anyone else to ride every rank POS in the universe. This is someone else's pony with an attitude problem, not Totilas that someone bought for you for $15 million that you have to figure out how to ride to get tour country a gold medal.

    Toss it back and go ride something worthwhile.

    For what its worth I know someone who got dumped off a lesson pony she was schooling and it has been endless harangue with sevwral surgeriea, workers comp blah blag blah for YEARS.

    Who needs it?
    That was my thought too.

    Regardless of whether or not the pony's behavior is actually dangerous (it's not—he just sounds like a pig), you don't sound like you're having much fun. He's not a worldbeater so why is he worth your effort?



  17. #37
    Join Date
    Jun. 20, 2005
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    844

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    This reminds me of a fat, sassy appy hony I used to ride back when I was in IHSA that had recovered from a hock injury and needed ridden back into lesson-horse behavior. He'd do some of the same stuff (complete with, no lie, pig-squeals like I've never heard and running across the diagonal with buck-capriole maneuvers). He just needed ridden down but the difference was, I knew that munchkin and knew he wasn't "dangerous" if you could stick with his freshness. Which he worked out of in, oh, 5-10 min.

    I don't think I'd be that confident on something I've sat on once or twice. Or probably now, since I've morphed into a much more cautious mode. So yeah, I'd pass.



  18. #38
    Join Date
    Feb. 16, 2012
    Posts
    7

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    Hi all,

    Thank you so much for the advice Since the owner doesn't know him well I'm wondering if he appeared calm when she got him because he wasn't fit (he had been out of work for a while), and now that he's feeling better, his true colors are showing.

    I think I'm going to tell the owner that I'm not comfortable riding him, which is disappointing and hard for me to do because the owner is lovely, I'd love to have a horse to ride, and I really enjoy hanging around at the barn (and was hoping that others might offer to let me ride, once they got to know me). All of my previous barns/people that let me ride their horses are 4-6 hours away. But, as you've all said, it's not worth getting hurt, or having my confidence shaken. Sigh.



  19. #39
    Join Date
    Apr. 26, 2006
    Posts
    394

    Default Naughty pony!

    My guess is you never rode ponies. They require very quick reflexes and they have an uncanny ability to dish out what they think their riders can handle. I have my kids use the 3 second rule: you have 3 seconds to correct any undesirable thing the beast is doing wrong or they will keep at it.
    If that pony took that much advantage of you then you did not read and react to his warning signs quick enough. You must be the boss! Its starts even before you get on. Maybe if you arm yourself with some drawreins or at the very least have a martingale on so he can't get his head up to evade you.
    Think like a really bossy rider and you should gain some headway.
    Good luck!



  20. #40
    Join Date
    Apr. 23, 2005
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    RileysMom - Have you looked here?

    http://www.chronofhorse.com/forum/sh...d.php?t=227167



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