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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar. 16, 2008
    Location
    western NY
    Posts
    233

    Default Rear Tack in Slant Load

    Looking for pros and cons of having a rear tack room in a slant load trailer vs. just having the space completely open. Some questions:

    How much of a pain in the a-- is it to remove the collapsible partition if you don't want to use the rear tack?

    If you simply collapse the partition when not in use, how much road noise does it generate when towing and does it get in the way at all?

    If you never had a rear tack, would you get one in a new trailer?
    If so why?

    Thanks for any input.

    Mary in Western NY
    http://www.bpequine.com



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr. 12, 2010
    Location
    PA
    Posts
    389

    Default

    Depending on the brand of trailer the rear tack is very easy to remove or collapse (I have a Featherlite and its easy). Some horses do not like loading when it is open, some could care less. Personally I never put tack there but do put a muck tub, lead ropes, extra halters, pitchfork etc. We have a camera with sound in ours and I have never heard any extra road noise from it either open or shut (but we do secure ours).



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul. 23, 2008
    Location
    Da UP, eh
    Posts
    751

    Default

    I have a rear tack in my 3h exiss. I moved the saddle rack to the unfinished dressing room to use as a larger tack room/storage.

    I almost never collapse the rear tack area; It's always full of extra hay bags to switch out during the trip, hay for the shows, water for trail rides, spare shavings, etc. I like it because this way my show clothes/tack/whathaveyous in my tack/dressing room aren't always covered in little bits of flyaway hay.

    The ONLY time I've collapsed it down was to move a mare and foal. It took about 5 seconds to collapse against the wall, and was not as noisy going down the road as I thought it was going to be.

    The cons: It's a PITA to remove the back tack and center bar for the doors if you have a real problem loader (or have to move a manure spreader... just saying).

    I always go by the more storage space, the better.... Hope this helps!



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul. 29, 2009
    Location
    South Florida
    Posts
    640

    Default

    I've had 2 slants and rear tacks in both. I camp and the storage is a must for me. My current trailer is a weekender, so the rear tack holds all my horse tack, chairs, tire saver, step, hoses, tree savers, fence tape for the electric fence, etc And that doesn't count the saddles, pads, bridles, halters, medicines, brushes, etc I had 3 brush trays (added 2) and about 10 bridle hooks.

    As far as folding it up, I have done that one time with each traielr due to a horse that refused to back out of the trailer. I do have an escape door on the first stall. You have to empty the rear tack, take out the bolts holding the hinges and fold it up. then replace all the tack. Not something I'd want to do on a regular basis. Each trailer may vary on how the rear tack folds, but probably not by much. I use my trailer pretty much every weekend. I camped last weekend for 3 days and am heading out Fri for a 9 day trip, so the rear tack stays full of stuff.

    As far as leaving it in place folded, I think you would need to attach it somehow to keep it from opening up. I have 2 saddle racks, so you'd need to take those out if closing it up or removing it. If you don't want or need a rear tack, you'd probably be better off getting one without it or remove it, store it and don't use it. I personally couldn't do without mine.



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec. 31, 2007
    Location
    Ocala
    Posts
    332

    Default

    I have a 3-H slant and DH took out the rear tack to help someone move some furniture.

    He never put it back and I just realized upon reading this thread it has been over a year. I love the extra room loading and unloading without it. Tack goes up front and I guess I have never missed it.

    Don't know how hard it was to remove as I wasn't there.



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul. 5, 2007
    Location
    Beside Myself ~ Western NY
    Posts
    6,190

    Default

    We had a slant load with a fixed tack compartment in the back. BAD idea. The horses never learned the concept of loading in it. We created loading problems every time. It was even harder to unload them than it was to load. We traded the darn thing in.

    A friend had a swing out one and that was actually quite clever.

    Fixed tack compartments in a slant load require the last horse to load and turn immediately. If you have a hesitant loader, it may look in, see that divider 3 feet from his nose, and conclude there is no room in there for a whole horse. They had a hard time grasping the concept that the horse steps to the left. We got it figured out well enough that we could load and unload, but decided it wasn't worth the hassle. They were obedient, just not happy. Unloading, it not only requires the last horse to make a turn while backing out, but also decreases visibility for all horses unloading.



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar. 16, 2008
    Location
    western NY
    Posts
    233

    Default Rear Tack

    Thanks guys for your input. Sounds like most of you use the rear tack.

    I've never had one and when I go to horse shows with one horse, I use my trailer as a box stall. My horse loves being able to move around and look out the back as well as the front/side and I hang a hay bag and water for him on the top edge of the ramp. Obviously, I can't do that with a rear tack if I'm using it as a rear tack.

    Horseshrink, interesting that you had it but don't miss it. What about the hardware (hinges, latches) used for the rear tack that are still in the trailer? Do they get in the way at all?

    Another question for those that use the rear tack for say a pitchfork or broom....would you be able to leave those in there when you collapse the rear tack?

    Sorry for all the questions but I've never had one and need to make sure that if I get one on my new trailer, it won't be in my way.

    Thanks again,

    Mary in Western NY
    http://www.bpequine.com
    Last edited by Black Points; Feb. 15, 2012 at 02:46 PM. Reason: missing signature



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov. 5, 2002
    Location
    way out west
    Posts
    3,080

    Default

    My two horse b.p. has a collapsible rear tack. I have never used it in ten years. I prefer the open feeling, have a large tack room in front of the trailer that's sufficient for my needs, so I keep it in the collapsed position.



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Apr. 12, 2010
    Location
    PA
    Posts
    389

    Default

    We have shipped horses with the rear tack in and using it as an open "box stall" we just removed the two dividers, hung buckets and hay and horses were quite comfy.



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jul. 23, 2008
    Location
    Da UP, eh
    Posts
    751

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Black Points View Post
    Another question for those that use the rear tack for say a pitchfork or broom....would you be able to leave those in there when you collapse the rear tack?
    No, once the tack is collapsed (at least on my trailer), it folds flat and secures against the wall. There would be no place to store anything.
    I formed a box stall at one point by taking the last divider out to make a double sized 'stall'. Now, I prefer to have my horses tied in so that my jerk of a gelding can't nip at his neighbors over/under the divider.



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Feb. 9, 2005
    Location
    Ocala, FL
    Posts
    1,759

    Default

    I have a big horse. I'll be looking for a trailer sometime this spring. I will NOT consider one with a rear tack. Feels too restrictive.

    L



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Dec. 31, 2007
    Location
    Ocala
    Posts
    332

    Default

    Black Points: I guess all of the hardware was in/on the tack door? No hardware left in trailer except something permanently attached to the side wall, but small.

    Interestingly, I never used it for tack and had not had the trailer very long before DH removed it. So, maybe I would like it...don't know. I have a very large, extended dressing room, so plenty of storage up front plus the gooseneck.

    But, I do love the extra room when loading and unloading. My problem is that it is a step up and although my mare is very good at loading/unloading, I think I would prefer a ramp so I could turn her around and walk her out.

    I'm trying to figure out if a ramp can be installed after-market?



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Apr. 12, 2010
    Location
    PA
    Posts
    389

    Default

    Yes a ramp can be installed after market, but there are not too many places I would trust to do it. Ask in your area...



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Oct. 25, 2011
    Posts
    376

    Default

    Our 4-horse has the rear tack. It's collapsible and we do occasionally collapse it. We rarely use the last stall, and it can be a real pain to load/unload a horse in the rear stall if they are large or inexperienced. They have to go in and get out on their own, which I know all of them should do, but in real life that is not always the case.

    I definitely like the space for muck buckets and other bulky, grungy stuff. We also have extra halters and leads and basic first aid in there. I haven't stored tack in there for a long time, it stays much cleaner in the front tack.

    I have been meaning to get a supply of weather stripping type rubbery material and try to dampen the rattling bits in both of our trailers. Amazing how noisy they are inside.

    Also, if you're trailer shopping for a slant load, make sure your bigger horses fit! With draft crosses, we ended up having to get an 8' wide trailer and they're still a bit crowded against the rear wall with their hind legs. The first slant trailer we bought was too small and we had to resell it. The stall length is important.



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Nov. 30, 2009
    Posts
    748

    Default

    I have seen them used and have used them and would never own one. Confining and dangerous if any thing goes wrong. I want the option to turn horses around if required in an emergency, and I also want to get myself out if I am in. IMO they are not worth the increased risk. I use the bed of the truck for forks/buckets/stuff I do not want in the trailer.



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Jun. 4, 2002
    Location
    Suffolk, VA
    Posts
    16,684

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Black Points View Post
    Looking for pros and cons of having a rear tack room in a slant load trailer vs. just having the space completely open. Some questions:

    How much of a pain in the a-- is it to remove the collapsible partition if you don't want to use the rear tack?

    If you simply collapse the partition when not in use, how much road noise does it generate when towing and does it get in the way at all?

    If you never had a rear tack, would you get one in a new trailer?
    If so why?

    Thanks for any input.

    Mary in Western NY
    http://www.bpequine.com
    I have a Double D trailer and our rear tack compartment is on hinges. It swings completely out of the way without having to empty it so the back is fully open like a stock trailer to load. Nice feature and very convenient.

    I'd not want one that would not swing out like that. I think it makes it a PITA to load into a narrow space.



  17. #17
    Join Date
    Nov. 23, 2006
    Location
    Port Perry Ontario - formerly Prodomus
    Posts
    2,364

    Default

    We have a 4 horse - with a stallion divider for the first section by the emergency exit - so usually we use this section for the dirty stuff - hay, buckets, shavings and all the tools.

    I say get the tack room and tack it out if you don't need it.

    If we have 4 horses in we use the rear tack and put the stuff in there. Taking it out makes that rear stall larger and the horse can actually turn to come out. The only thing I don't like about taking it out is you don't have the butt bar.

    Don't use the rear for tack



  18. #18
    Join Date
    Nov. 2, 2009
    Location
    Iowa
    Posts
    386

    Default

    If you need to remove mine takes about 30 seconds. I wouldn't have one with out it.



  19. #19
    Join Date
    Sep. 26, 2008
    Posts
    1,289

    Default

    I have a 3 horse slant w/ rear tack and I use the rear tack as there are no saddle racks in the dressing room and the dressing room short wall is about 1 ft, its tiny, my problem loader actually loves the trailer, go figure, but he usually gets the middle spot



  20. #20
    Join Date
    Nov. 4, 2003
    Location
    Sanger, TX, USA
    Posts
    4,811

    Default

    My trailer is without--saddle rack in tack room that swings out. Nice to know they can be folded up and secured. Wanted the ability to turn horse around and walk out forward. Had a tough loader and this worked well for him. Mine's a step up but a very low step up. Would like to have some sort of butt bar for second horse, especially since I have a large single door in the back.

    If I was camping, traveling a lot, the rear could be very handy but then I would probably want a three horse for the two guys so the second one in wouldn't feel so confined.

    Someone recently posted some pictures of a couple of trailers where the
    dressing room wall could be swung back against the side, opening up the trailer for other uses. Like taking the Gator to the shop, etc. If there is ever another trailer in my future, that will be high on my list of must haves.
    Julie
    www.centaurfencing.com
    Safer, Stronger, Lasts Longer!
    Godspeed BARBARO--Run fast and free!



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