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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec. 10, 2009
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    Default Stall size; horse gets cast?

    http://www.thehorse.com/ViewArticle....D=19588&src=VW

    I just read this about Stacy Westfalls mare Roxy, cast in a stall.

    As we are just building a new barn... is there anything we can do to prevent horses getting cast?

    I know of another horse that injured it's stifle getting cast in a 10x10... does the size of the stall matter?

    someone said they had a horse would walk right up to any pasture fence and get cast too...
    just hoping there's something we might do for prevention in our new barn.



  2. #2
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    May. 15, 2009
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    Eastern Ontario, CND
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    Default

    If it's something you're really worried about you can either bank your bedding in your stall or add an anti-caste rail.
    "For some people it's not enough to just be a horse's bum, you have to be sea biscuit's bum" -anon.
    Nes' Farm Blog ~ DesigNes.ca
    Need You Now Equine



  3. #3
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    Dec. 13, 1999
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    Greensboro, NC
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    Default

    Size generally doesn't matter, though certainly if it's big enough, there is less of a chance of ending up at a wall when rolling. Yes, horses can get cast against a wooden fence in a 10 acre pasture

    My WB got cast regularly as a 2yo. His stall wasn't all that large, maybe 10x14 or so, but he'd get cast on the long wall, meaning he was rolling the short way.

    But then again, he's one who has rolled a few times into my fence too - 8 acres Some horses just aren't as spatially aware as they should be.
    ______________________________
    The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances. - ET



  4. #4
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    Dec. 12, 2004
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    Massachusetts
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    6,475

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by JB View Post
    Some horses just aren't as spatially aware as they should be.
    That is the really, really kind way to put it.

    But no, size ultimately doesn't matter a ton if you're talking about the average stall size. (If you're thinking about going down to 6x10 or something then it's a concern.) My stalls are 10x10...I would have liked them bigger, but built into an existing building. My gelding LOVES his naps, and lies down in his stall on a nightly basis. (The other five horses I've had come through the barn also all laid down periodically.) Never had an issue.

    My boss has a stud in what's at least a 14x14 stall....he gets himself stuck pretty frequently, and we're just waiting for him to be one of the pasture fence guys.

    Depends more on the horse, not on the stall/area size. Don't stress about it...if your horse doesn't kill itself in the stall, it will kill itself some other way!



  5. #5
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    Oct. 5, 2007
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    1,013

    Default

    Our 7mo filly (~13hh), has gotten cast 3 times in her 14x12 stall. I think it's something quite a few horses go through as babies/youngins -- size definitely doesn't have anything to do with it in this case!

    I'd still build the biggest stalls you can, but that's more more general comfort for the horse -- 10x12 or bigger, if you can manage.



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb. 9, 2005
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    Upper Midwest
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    Default

    My little idot (aka yearling filly) got cast against a round bale feeder in a big pasture. Luckily, after some inital minor struggling, she redeemed herself and just waited for someone to come rescue her. *sigh*

    Nes has good advice.
    Siouxland Sporthorses: http://slsfarm.blogspot.com/

    DIY Journey of Remodeling the Farmette: http://weownblackacre.blogspot.com/



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Sep. 13, 2002
    Location
    Pacific Northwest
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    Default

    My horse that likes to get cast has done so rolling in the arena -- loves the corner, no matter how big a box he is in! When he was on extended stall rest here at home, I found him cast a couple of times and we put up boards on the wall to help him out in the future. Rather than buying the expensive ones you can find online, we just used 2x4s bolted to the wall at a certain height (I started a thread here in the past about what height, and can't remember exactly what we did -- maybe 30" up? I went by where he had marked up the wall trying to get up when he was cast previously!). He has not been cast since that I have seen -- I'm not sure if he used the boards, but I think he might have, judging by some of the marks on the wall. I also kept his bedding banked when he was locked in but now that he comes and goes, we went back to flat bedding, otherwise he took most of it with him into his paddock and made a mess.



  8. #8
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    Feb. 6, 2007
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    Maryland USA
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    Default

    Even if you are sure there is no more chance of a horse getting cast in a 12x12 stall than a 10x10, it certainly feels a lot safer going into a 12x12 to help a cast horse than trying to find somewhere to stand in a 10x10 that is out of hoof reach.



  9. #9
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    Sep. 13, 2002
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    Quote Originally Posted by tangledweb View Post
    Even if you are sure there is no more chance of a horse getting cast in a 12x12 stall than a 10x10, it certainly feels a lot safer going into a 12x12 to help a cast horse than trying to find somewhere to stand in a 10x10 that is out of hoof reach.
    No kidding! Dummy cast in the arena was easy to help since we had so much room and soft footing. No fun when they are cast in 10x10 show stalls...been there too (not my horse but still scary).



  10. #10
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    May. 11, 2009
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    Dairyville USA
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    Trever got cast in the indoor with great frequency. Even in the middle of the pasture. I would suspect being a broodmare heavy in foal is what precipitated the incident wherein Whizard's Baby Doll became cast. IME anti cast strips and banking the bedding do nothing but make people feel better by thinking they're "doing something"
    Michael: Seems the people who burned me want me for a job.
    Sam: A job? Does it pay?
    Michael: Nah, it's more of a "we'll kill you if you don't do it" type of thing.
    Sam: Oh. I've never liked those.



  11. #11
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    Nov. 2, 2001
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    Default

    I suppose more space invites rolling.
    To prevent casting, but them in a tie stall....
    Quote Originally Posted by Mozart View Post
    Personally, I think the moderate use of shock collars in training humans should be allowed.



  12. #12
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    Mar. 3, 2010
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    I have seen more horses cast in large stalls than small ones.

    My theory is that with the way their eyes are set they have to choose a left or right reality to which to address their response. In a large stall they trust that it is large enough. In a small stall it will not be. Their eyes deceive them Think about it, same reason they get cast on the fenceline. Their other eye says it is okay.

    Not that a horse can't find a way to cast himself, injure himself etc ANYWHERE!
    “Reality is merely an illusion, albeit a very persistent one.”
    ― Albert Einstein



  13. #13
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    Dec. 10, 2009
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    Default

    I was having a look at my stalls now.... they have horizontal wood, and the boards don't fit tight, they flex.

    In my previous barn, my young horse would cast often! The boards were new, and vertical... and now I wonder if the hooves slip more.

    Could you put strips of rubber- horizontally
    instead of a 2x4? with horses loving to chew and all.



  14. #14
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    Aug. 13, 2009
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    I agree with the others who say size of stall doesn't matter. Although I prefer nothing smaller than a 12 x 12, my stalls are 12 x 16 with 30 "runs" on them. I have a mare that gets cast out in her 16 x 30' run! Since it's 3 board she can kick it apart and get up, so mess for me, but she never gets hurt! I also have another mare that has twice in 5 years gotten cast out in the pasture! With several acres to roll in, she just had to roll near the fence! It is no-climb fence, so she had a harder time getting up, but fence is ok and so is horse.

    Also have a friend with a little QH that gets cast often, so she moved him to a foaling stall. he still gets cast just as often!



  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by 17Rider View Post
    Could you put strips of rubber- horizontally
    instead of a 2x4? with horses loving to chew and all.
    So far, my horse hasn't chewed on the 2x4s ... I was thinking maybe the height wasn't convenient for him to chew, being low like they are (kind of like how my top boards on the little bit of wood fencing I have get chewed most, rather than the lower boards). He has in the past picked up rubber stall mats (off the floor) and torn chunks off of them, so hanging strips up on the wall would probably just invite him to tear them off! But that is him, and others have hung the mat strips up and felt they worked. I like the 2x4s as they give a nice ridge for him to brace on. When I've seen him cast, his feet weren't slipping so much due to a slick wall, but not having something to push against. But that's just what I've observed with him.



  16. #16
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    Jan. 18, 2008
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    Alberta, Canada and South Australia
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    Default

    What are anti-cast stripes/ rails??

    I have done waaaay to many runs out to the barn at who knows what time in the night to rescue horses. We now have all walls with rubber on them, 4 or 5 feet up the wall, which has to point helped. This is round 2 with the rubber wall since the first time they just ripped the rubber off in stripes .

    P.



  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Polydor View Post
    What are anti-cast stripes/ rails??

    I have done waaaay to many runs out to the barn at who knows what time in the night to rescue horses. We now have all walls with rubber on them, 4 or 5 feet up the wall, which has to point helped. This is round 2 with the rubber wall since the first time they just ripped the rubber off in stripes .

    P.
    http://www.americasacres.com/product...-Safety-Strips
    Quote Originally Posted by Mozart View Post
    Personally, I think the moderate use of shock collars in training humans should be allowed.



  18. #18
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    Apr. 1, 2011
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    British Columbia, Canada
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by horsefaerie View Post
    I have seen more horses cast in large stalls than small ones.

    My theory is that with the way their eyes are set they have to choose a left or right reality to which to address their response. In a large stall they trust that it is large enough. In a small stall it will not be. Their eyes deceive them Think about it, same reason they get cast on the fenceline. Their other eye says it is okay.

    Not that a horse can't find a way to cast himself, injure himself etc ANYWHERE!
    Very interesting theory!!



  19. #19
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    Dec. 10, 2009
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    Default

    I heard someone say they don't like bigger stalls (12x12) because it encourages the horses to roll in the shavings...and maybe get cast. She thought in 10x10, horses don't try to roll as much.

    I am pretty sure I want 12x12 for my 17h horses... but we'll have 2 10x12 and 2 10x10... for those smaller or messiest horses...



  20. #20
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    Jul. 19, 2010
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    Wow, I don’t believe I have ever read a tread in COTH where everybody is pretty much on the same page! For those readers wondering what a “cast rail” is, basically a 2X4 attached horizontally to the stall walls high enough that the average horse can get some “purchase” with one of their hoofs to push themselves away from the wall. In stalls where the wall boards are not interconnecting, I.e. not tongue and grove, the boards will flex in and they will be able to get a hoof on the bottom of one of them and be able to push off.
    IMO horses don’t get “cast” per-se along a fence line they get a leg under the bottom board. It doesn’t matter the size of the field. It’s where the dirt is. We have found that providing a sand roll in the middle of the paddock pretty much eliminates this. No so much with the uneducated. But they learn.



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