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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul. 2, 2005
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    1,655

    Default Fencing for rocky ground????

    After having a horse get loose this week, I want to completely enclose our property from the street. This means I need a line of fencing of about 20-30 feet between our house and a current fenced pasture. And I need another sort of S curved line of fencing from one pasture going across a driveway (with a gate) to another pasture.

    The problem with our land is that the ground under both these lines of proposed fencing is major rocky. A few of our existing fence posts are held in place with concrete cause the holes could not be dug deep enough.

    I could do rock walls, like in Ireland. That is probably really expensive. I thought of split rail fencing like Civil War type where the rails lay on one another. I would love to avoid having to put fence posts in.

    Any ideas or suggestions?
    ********
    There is no snooze button on a cat that wants breakfast.



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr. 17, 2002
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    between the barn and the pond
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  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan. 5, 2010
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    2,152

    Default

    Bonetti's Defense :=) I thought it fitting considering the rocky terrain...
    Nudging "Almost Heaven" a little closer still...
    http://www.wvhorsetrainer.com



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar. 24, 2010
    Location
    Tucson
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    Default

    It depends on availability in your area, but railroad ties arranged similarly to that Z Fence (zigzag not necessary) can work well. You can get them for $1/tie here, though - may not be as available where you are.
    My horse is a dressage diva so I don't have to be.

    Quote Originally Posted by katarine
    If you have a fat gay horse that likes Parelli, you're really screwed



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan. 5, 2010
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    2,152

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Bank of Dad View Post
    I could do rock walls, like in Ireland. That is probably really expensive. I thought of split rail fencing like Civil War type where the rails lay on one another. I would love to avoid having to put fence posts in.

    Any ideas or suggestions?
    On the serious side,

    Those zig-zag fences look really neat.... seen quite a few in minnesota too
    Nudging "Almost Heaven" a little closer still...
    http://www.wvhorsetrainer.com



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb. 28, 2006
    Location
    The rocky part of KY
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    Default

    We have limestone close to the surface here too. We can either pay to have a guy with a Beltec drill put in the holes or use t-posts - you can shift a t post back and forth till you find a spot if your ground is rocky and doesn't have ledge under there.
    We've thought about the rail fences but you lose a lot of ground if they are a perimeter fence and you want to keep the whole thing on your side.

    They definitely have their uses over real rocky ground http://t1.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:A...aVmi4w_F4r5WV0
    Courageous Weenie Eventer Wannabe
    Incredible Invisible



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr. 17, 2002
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    between the barn and the pond
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    Default

    You need the Z shape for strength laterally. Otherwise Mr Horse will just push on it and topple it over.There are no fence posts to hold the fence up- the fence itself holds itself up.



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb. 28, 2006
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    The rocky part of KY
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    Quote Originally Posted by katarine View Post
    You need the Z shape for strength laterally. Otherwise Mr Horse will just push on it and topple it over.There are no fence posts to hold the fence up- the fence itself holds itself up.
    If you are referring to that fence in the picture link - I just picked it to illustrate the kind of ground they (the rail fences) are the absolute best for. It's a whole lot of extra work with those little short perpendicular rests. Short could be as long as three feet though, there's no scale in that pic.
    There's a sample buck fence at McConnell Springs in Lex and the thing is at least five feet in width, that's a lot of land to lose.
    Courageous Weenie Eventer Wannabe
    Incredible Invisible



  9. #9
    Join Date
    May. 17, 2003
    Posts
    5,641

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    Buck fence is the way they go around here. You can do a straight line of fence, about 2'6" at the base. For horses, I would put an off-set electric wire on it so they don't munch their way out...



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Apr. 17, 2002
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    between the barn and the pond
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    Quote Originally Posted by ReSomething View Post
    If you are referring to that fence in the picture link - I just picked it to illustrate the kind of ground they (the rail fences) are the absolute best for. It's a whole lot of extra work with those little short perpendicular rests. Short could be as long as three feet though, there's no scale in that pic.
    There's a sample buck fence at McConnell Springs in Lex and the thing is at least five feet in width, that's a lot of land to lose.
    I was responding to netg, not to you.



  11. #11
    Join Date
    May. 15, 2009
    Location
    Eastern Ontario, CND
    Posts
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    I would do the buck fence as well, but the way it's normally done around here there are 3 legs/post instead of 2 so it doesn't spread out quite so wide. Very safe as long as it is maintained, and it lasts forever.
    "For some people it's not enough to just be a horse's bum, you have to be sea biscuit's bum" -anon.
    Nes' Farm Blog ~ DesigNes.ca
    Need You Now Equine



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Mar. 24, 2010
    Location
    Tucson
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    Quote Originally Posted by katarine View Post
    You need the Z shape for strength laterally. Otherwise Mr Horse will just push on it and topple it over.There are no fence posts to hold the fence up- the fence itself holds itself up.
    For a non-turnout area, I don't think horse-leaning protection is likely as needed, but the curve is likely enough if railroad ties are used. Those suckers are HUGE and heavy, more so than the z-fencing shown. Neighbors have a stud pen made with them with no posts into the ground and it holds up fine.
    My horse is a dressage diva so I don't have to be.

    Quote Originally Posted by katarine
    If you have a fat gay horse that likes Parelli, you're really screwed



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Nov. 23, 2009
    Location
    Lyman, ME
    Posts
    401

    Default

    Depending upon the quantity of rock available, you could construct a low stonewall about 1 1/2 feet high, supporting posts that get you to your 4 1/2 fence height...that might look really attractive too. You could use concrete as well around the post points, then just do dry stonewall in between. We are only talking only a 4 post fence here, 8 feet on center...



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Dec. 2, 2004
    Location
    Eastern Ontario, Canada
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    1,471

    Default

    I have shallow soil. The vast majority of fencing on my place is called 'patent' fencing. I rebuilt a section of it last fall. I put two strands of electric wire on it to keep the horses from pushing on it.

    Picture here: http://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fb...type=1&theater

    I like working with patent fence. The cedar poles are light enough for me to handle, and the fencing wire is very inexpensive.



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Feb. 28, 2006
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    The rocky part of KY
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    Crud, Draftdriver, I'd like to see that but I'm getting the "you don't have permission to visit this page".
    Courageous Weenie Eventer Wannabe
    Incredible Invisible



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Dec. 2, 2004
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    Eastern Ontario, Canada
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    Quote Originally Posted by ReSomething View Post
    Crud, Draftdriver, I'd like to see that but I'm getting the "you don't have permission to visit this page".
    I *think* I fixed it. Please try again and let me know. (Relatively new to FB )



  17. #17
    Join Date
    Feb. 28, 2006
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    The rocky part of KY
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    Default

    Got it this time. That fence intrigues me and looks very good for my woods - what sorts of dimensions are the logs, the height, width of the X, is it wired or pinned etc etc?
    Courageous Weenie Eventer Wannabe
    Incredible Invisible



  18. #18
    Join Date
    Dec. 2, 2004
    Location
    Eastern Ontario, Canada
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    Default

    The long logs are about 8 ft long. Can be any consistent length, depending on what's available in your area. Shorter is stronger, but then you will need more pickets.

    Pickets are 5 ft long and 2.5 - 3 inches across at the skinny end. Plant them fat end down. You may have need of some longer or shorter ones, depending on how the fence goes together. It's like a giant jigsaw puzzle. Some people put a bracer, usually about 3 ft long, between the two picket legs which run perpendicular to the long rails, to keep things from splaying out under the weight of the long logs. Sometimes I used them, sometimes I was able to use other material like half-exposed rocks, to brace the picket legs against.

    Two, 3 or 4 pickets are used at each junction, 4 being the strongest configuration. The first two are set perpendicular to the long poles. The second two are set more in line with the plane of the long poles, and are used to brace the first pickets, one on each side of the fence. I often found that 3 pickets worked well for me, tripod fashion.

    The lowest rail of the fence goes on top of the bracer, to keep it away from the dampness of the ground. I was working with a century-old fence line and if the lower run was rotten and moldering into the ground, I left it in place and built over top of it. I was able to salvage more than 90 percent of the long poles and re-use them. Cedar is a remarkable wood.

    Everything is wired with soft black fencing wire. Up here, one can get 50 lb packages for $70. Usually there are 4 or 5 rolls in the package, so it's moveable in smaller quantities once you get it home. That will do an awful lot of fencing! The heavier the gauge, the stronger the wire will be. As with electric wire, small numbers means larger diameter.

    Don't wire to living trees -- in about 30 years, the wire will be grown into the bark of the living tree, and will choke it to death.

    A good pair or pliers is a must! I prefer blunt nosed pliers to fencing pliers. When twisting the wire, get it tight, so it bites into the wood. Trim and pound down the rabbit-ear ends so there is less chance of humans or animals getting cut by them. I carry a little plastic pail with me to collect the cut off ends. I also carry a hand saw or pruning saw to trim or cut shorter pieces, as needed, and to cut back surrounding brush.

    I do this solo, and enjoy the peace of the land, the scenery, etc. The work would go more quickly with a good helper.
    Last edited by draftdriver; Feb. 16, 2012 at 01:38 PM. Reason: Add more detail



  19. #19
    Join Date
    Feb. 28, 2006
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    The rocky part of KY
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    Thank you Draft Driver. We have old fenceline criss crossing our woods - unfortunately it's old field fence and you generally find it by hanging up the brushhog or tripping over it. The only wire left is the bottom, heavier gauge one.
    Courageous Weenie Eventer Wannabe
    Incredible Invisible



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