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View Poll Results: Pros, do you do the work so you have clients, or have clients so you can do the work?

Voters
18. You may not vote on this poll
  • I ride/train so I can have clients.

    3 16.67%
  • I have clients so I can ride/train.

    12 66.67%
  • To heck with A Rand, you gotta stick to the middle of the road.

    3 16.67%
Results 1 to 16 of 16
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun. 21, 2009
    Location
    Hunterdon County NJ
    Posts
    3,009

    Default Professionals....

    Do you ride to have clients?

    OR

    Do you have clients so you can ride?

    (I should confess, I just watched the movie of Ayn Rand's The Fountainhead.)



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug. 25, 2005
    Location
    Northeast
    Posts
    10,809

    Wink No vote!!!!!

    Dunno! Have the same sort of clients since I stopped riding, and showing.

    But have observed that to the general public, you are felt to "know' more when you show. What ever your scores. You show!! So obviously you are a better instructor.
    Even if you,after years, can't crack 60, at First.
    Some riders change their horse, they change their saddle, they change their teacher; they never change themselves.



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb. 22, 2007
    Posts
    3,928

    Default

    As someone who has been self-employed for most of her life (save some temp jobs) and done quite well for herself: I read The Fountainhead and wanted to shoot myself afterwards. Ayn Rand is a terrible author, and the objectivist philosophy is no more than an extreme response to her growing up in the USSR. I only read The Fountainhead because I won a copy in an essay contest and have an aversion to having books I haven't read on my shelves. I wrote an essay on Anthem for a high school English class (also, Anthem is such a ripoff of Zamiatin's We--for someone who so idolized people with unique ideas, Rand didn't have many) which was submitted to some national Objectivist Society or Foundation or whatever by my teacher, and won honorable mention so I got a nice copy of The Fountainhead. Funny part is that I didn't write my actual thoughts on the topic (as a true objectivist should, from my understanding) but rather what I thought my teacher wanted to hear so I could pass the class and get on with life. My favorite* part is when Roarke rapes the main female character and as a result she falls in love with him.

    Anyway, I train professionally because I love to work with horses, so I can't imagine a better way to make a living. I'd ride whether I did it professionally or not, and my business is totally on my terms--I've intentionally diversified my income streams to make it that way. I kind of quit because I wasn't getting the right kind of clients, but lately I've been getting a lot of interest so it's beginning to be a bigger part of my income again (went from full time to part-time for a little while). So I guess both? Neither? The Fountainhead is a ridiculous piece of so-called literature that no one should bother to read because all the ideas in it are put forth more eloquently elsewhere and heavy-handed parables with 30-page speeches suck?

    *by "favorite" I mean the part I first wanted to gouge my eyes out at so I could stop reading. Still not sure how I finished it.



  4. #4
    Join Date
    May. 20, 2005
    Location
    Desert Southwest
    Posts
    6,301

    Default

    The Gary Cooper/Patricia Neal film? Embarassingly bad. The more recent "Atlas Shrugged" (part 1) was pretty well done, but Rand's "philosophy" is pretty hard to stomach unless you're a dyed in the wool Objectivist.

    Nevertheless, Rand has nothing to do with why I teach. If I didn't teach, I'd still have a horse, ride it and compete. If I taught but had no horse, I'd find some way to keep my butt in the saddle. I teach riders; haven't had a client's horse in training for a while now.

    I teach because I love it. I love seeing a student get that "AHA" moment. I love seeing a rerider regain her poise and confidence. I love the horses; love what they can do for us spiritually and physically; love to watch my students find that magic in the relationship.

    Anyway, so I couldn't answer the poll.



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec. 27, 1999
    Location
    Midland, NC, USA
    Posts
    7,262

    Default

    Well, I would ride no matter what, but if it was just a matter of being able to afford to ride I would ditch teaching and put all my hours into horseshoeing, which is significantly more profitable. So.... Dunno. I enjoy riding, I enjoy teaching, I enjoy shoeing horses, I enjoy breeding horses. I guess I'm diversified!!

    Jennifer



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun. 21, 2009
    Location
    Hunterdon County NJ
    Posts
    3,009

    Default

    I read the book Atlas Shrugged and watched the movie of The Fountainhead. Yes, the movie was hard to deal with. No rape in the movie. She whacks Roark across the face with her riding crop but in the movie all the vicious behavior is perpetrated by everyone else but Roark.

    I liked the poll question because I do know equine professionals who will do or say anything to 'keep the wheels greased,' keep the clients happy, paying, etc. Regardless of whether it is good for the horses, horsemanship, or in the clients' best interest long term.

    Consider all the threads complaining about drugging horses, riding horses badly for the sake of 'frame,' ribbons,etc. There do seem to be plenty of folks willing to short change everyone and everything so long as it keeps them in the game and financed.

    I know only a few horseman who hold their principles absolute.



  7. #7
    Join Date
    May. 6, 2009
    Location
    The Left Coast
    Posts
    3,318

    Default

    I'm not a trainer, but I would like to vote to heck with Ayn Rand anyway.

    Thank you.
    2012 goal: learn to ride like a Barn Rat

    A helmet saved my life.



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan. 31, 2010
    Location
    Alberta
    Posts
    3,928

    Default

    I teach because I like to teach.

    I board because I like to have people to ride with, but prefer to have my horses at home.

    Because of the above, I am quick to say Adieu to any clients that do not share my barn's philosophies/goals.

    I used to train because I liked to train, but now that my legs are going, so is my nerve, so I train more because it is part of what I feel I need to offer, and less because I really want to. I no longer take the "problem" horses though, which is something I used to really enjoy.



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Apr. 17, 2002
    Location
    between the barn and the pond
    Posts
    14,495

    Default

    A clear conscience is usually the sign of a bad memory.

    -Steven Wright





    Ahhh, youth!



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jun. 21, 2009
    Location
    Hunterdon County NJ
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    3,009

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by katarine View Post
    A clear conscience is usually the sign of a bad memory.

    -Steven Wright





    Ahhh, youth!

    Hah!!



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jun. 21, 2009
    Location
    Hunterdon County NJ
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    3,009

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by TheHorseProblem View Post
    I'm not a trainer, but I would like to vote to heck with Ayn Rand anyway.

    Thank you.
    You've got plenty of company there.

    But I still want credit for slogging thru a monster of a book. And really, I did find things in it worth exploring.

    When I see trainers/business owners who proudly display banks, and banks, and banks of WEF blues and tricolors, I also see practices I don't admire, behavior I deplore, etc. And it just never occurred to me to ask "why do they do this?" What are these professionals getting out of the horse business? What are their values?



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Feb. 12, 2004
    Location
    No. VA
    Posts
    683

    Default

    I perceive myself in the first category, which is probably "wrong" and also the reason I have an unhealthy ratio of horses I own to horses I get paid to ride.



  13. #13
    Join Date
    May. 6, 2009
    Location
    The Left Coast
    Posts
    3,318

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Isabeau Z Solace View Post
    You've got plenty of company there.

    But I still want credit for slogging thru a monster of a book. And really, I did find things in it worth exploring.
    I speed-read it as an underemployed 18-year-old, and by the time I got to the Speech, I just skimmed, I was so sick of the whole thing!

    But Isabeau, are you assuming that success in the show ring somehow makes the motivation less worthy?
    2012 goal: learn to ride like a Barn Rat

    A helmet saved my life.



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Feb. 23, 2005
    Location
    Spotsylvania, VA
    Posts
    13,580

    Default

    No one in their right mind would pay me to ride or train but one of the saddest things I ever heard was from a horse professional. "I don't like to ride anymore, it's just a job"
    I wasn't always a Smurf
    Penmerryl's Sophie RIDSH
    "I ain't as good as I once was but I'm as good once as I ever was"
    The ignore list is my friend. It takes 2 to argue.



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Jun. 21, 2009
    Location
    Hunterdon County NJ
    Posts
    3,009

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by carolprudm View Post
    No one in their right mind would pay me to ride or train but one of the saddest things I ever heard was from a horse professional. "I don't like to ride anymore, it's just a job"
    Ah yes, I am familiar with that. And, I can even understand it to a certain extent.

    So much of what passes as 'success,' feels like just cramming one bright young horsey after another into the same old boring box.

    'Success' is ribbons. Regional championships. USDF medals. International credentials. Most dressage trainers trying to explain their skill set will explain their competition credentials.

    It is an error to think competition credentials and skill set are the same thing, but it is a very human error to make.

    I'll pick an easy example...Buck Brannaman doesn't have too many of those....(at least dressage wise.) But I doubt there is a student, working or paying, in the USA who could do better for themselves to work with him INSTEAD of their current trainer.

    And not because he is in a recent movie, but because his values reign well over those of most 'professional' horse trainers who are trying to get/keep clients.

    Most professionals will do what is necessary to keep clients like McDonalds will do what is necessary to keep customers. Most professionals will attempt to perfect what the customer will pay for.

    Therein lies the ultimate failure that is 'high stakes/top level' western pleasure, saddlebred/gaited, racing, and now, or so it seems, dressage. Almost all sports seem to pursue ultimate achievement, ultimate putrefaction, and ultimate bastardization simultaneously.



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Jun. 13, 2001
    Location
    usa
    Posts
    6,133

    Default

    Is the main question: Are you willing to compromise principles to get or keep clients? Or, which comes first, the horse or the client?
    I.D.E.A. yoda



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