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  1. #41
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    I've heard of bears scaring horses so badly that they'd run thru pasture fences but never heard of one actually attacking a horse. Bears are more predators of opportunity..like they stumble over a newborn fawn or something but rarely stalk and hunt like cougars or wolves. We have a lot of bears here and they never bother us or our horses. Usually you hear of bears getting into a cornfield or something around here.



  2. #42
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    May. 19, 2011
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    IME, theyd have to be very desperate or very stupid to try and take down a full grown horse. Ive kept and raised horses in north texas now for going on 11 years..never had issues with coyotes and my larger livestock.

    I have lost barn kitties to them..unfortunantly..and I keep LGD's with my sheep..but they've never bothered my horses (foals or otherwise) and my cattle.



  3. #43
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    Sep. 14, 2004
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    Our pasture seems to be a coyote highway, I see them passing through on a regular basis. The horses pay little attention to them, if any, which annoys me at times, because they WILL occasionally chase my big dog out of the pasture.

    Last summer I took my Yorkie out after dark. Saw a coyote at the fenceline close to the house. The Yorkie saw it too and started running after it, barking. The coyote trotted off about 20 ft, then stopped and turned to watch the dog...as if sizing up the tiny 'threat' or, perhaps, wondering how it had the nerve. I made a mad dash to grab the silly pooch and the coyote finally took off.

    My favorite cat disappeared within two months of moving in, as have most of the neighborhood cats since. I'm sure the coyotes pick them off. The main reason I won't keep barn cats.

    I've seen some pretty interesting interactions between coyotes, deer, and my dog over the years, but have never once been concerned about the safety of the horses.
    Is it me or do 99.9% of cowboys just look better with their hats on?
    <><



  4. #44
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    Mar. 3, 2007
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    North-Central IL
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    We've had an upsurge around my place for the last few years. I know this because besides seeing them regularly and their prints up by the house there hasn't been a feral cat on the farm in years, either (which is VERY unusual). I would say about five years ago I was hanging out with my horse and looking out his back door (cattle barn, stall in one end left open onto a paddock) and heard a coyote (or possibly coy-dog, can't say for sure) scream, come running in my direction, then turn around and scream again. The dumb thing had run under the electric rope fence and gotten shocked each time. I'm not sure if he even knew the horse was there or whether he was just being nosy. So, ours are fairly brazen, but they've never actually taken a shot at a horse.

    Like another poster, I've heard of bobcat sightings, and those worry me much worse. I will say though, the coyotes scare ME!
    Quarry Rat



  5. #45
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    Feb. 6, 2003
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    Bears: do tend to scare the crap out of any domestic animal with a keen sense of smell. mainly because bear STINK to high heaven. Black bear aren't known to attack horses or livestock in general. They will swipe at dogs if dogs try chasing or harassing them. They're much more apt to break into garbage cans, bird feeders, cat food, etc. They have a ridiculously fantastic sense of smell, so don't try hiding these things.

    Coyote: will not attack large livestock. They will nosh on dead livestock, but then what carnivore wouldn't? They will eat chickens, turkeys, cats and small dogs. One of the least safe thing to do is to own a snack-sized dog in a very rural area. Unless you plan to keep it leashed, pan on something trying to snack on it. A person in town here lost a Yorkie to a hawk. If it's small enough for a bird to eat it, it's too small to be outside without a leash period. Don't care if you're out there watching it, at least with the leash you can yank it back up out of something's throat. Coyote tend to look a lot larger than they are. They have long legs and stand-up layered fur. But basically it's a canid smaller than a beagle on stilts for legs wearing a puffy coat. A coyote is not a wolf. Or Cujo. They are smart as hell and even nosier than they are smart. So they often will stand around and watch people and pets. To coyotes people and pets are like reality TV. And no matter where you live, you most likely have coyotes. Even in suburbs and cities. They are extremely adaptable and can stay invisible until they want to be seen. Believe me when I say they're not "just showing up" ...they've been there all along.

    Bobcats: If you live rural, you most likely have them. Most states have a healthy population of them. And they've seen you plenty of times. To see bobcats...look up. You've probably walked or ridden under them a few times. They will most definitely not bother horses. Like a coyote, they look enormous compared to their actual weight and size/
    You jump in the saddle,
    Hold onto the bridle!
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  6. #46
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    Feb. 14, 2003
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    Thanks for that post Misty- exactly my experiences. I've trotted right past coyotes while trail riding, they are such curious, nosy things--they used to sit and watch us ride in lessons at the farm just down the road from my house. Same farm had black bears in the upper fields, eating black berries each fall. Boy, they horses all paid attention to that! But, honestly, not a thing I was concerned about--neat to see, keep your distance, but horses and bears are not food and fork.

    Bobcat? really? If you are bunny sized, then worry. A cougar is the scariest thing I can think of around here. They attack from behind and above, silently. Ack! Thankfully, there are so many deer that I'm not worried about my horses in the least. Now, me, hiking? That gives my the occasional bout of "willies".
    Proud member of the "Don't rush to kill wildlife" clique!



  7. #47
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    May. 4, 2006
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    Quote Originally Posted by Calvincrowe View Post
    Again...Coyotes (is it that hard to spell??) will not attack/hunt healthy, adult large animals. I seriously doubt that rancher's calves were killed by coyotes; our neighbor's cow/calf pairs have never been predated by our local coyotes. I suppose if we had harsher winters and his calves were born in January/February this *might* be a concern...maybe....

    I've seen coyotes in my fields many times, hunting mice or voles, right alongside my two geldings. Least of my worries about my farm, animals and life!
    This is not true, they will kill deer, have neighbors who heard/saw the pack pulling them down. Most definitely they will kill calves if they can, and sheep, as they killed six large ewes on Bainbridge on a farm that I lived on, the couple had the carcasses checked out, and there are no roaming dogs there period. They will even change their hunting patterns, as they never used to hunt in packs, or not usually, and in some areas they do. They will hunt and kill what they can get when they get populous, thus hungry enough. They kill cats and dogs here all of the time. I lived on Bainbridge (Brain Dead) and now on the Olympic Peninsula. Big problem here. In the area where I live now they are somewhat less of a problem because more people own big dogs and they do free roam, plus these folks shoot.

    The poster who wrote ki-oat-ees was playing a word game. I don't think the person is illiterate or unable to spell. I don't see coyotes as harmless little predators, no more than the damned overpopulation of eagles who also take dogs and cats and every other thing they can on Brain Dead Island, because they are too numerous. Same goes for the owls, who some fruit loop Greenies have been feeding there, one juvenile swooped my 16 lb Jack Russell on a walk there and actually FOLLOWED US on the walk and tried several times. Another adult nesting Great Horned or some larger owl attacked a horseback rider, flying into her face and attacking her head. They have no fear because they are not hunted or kept at a level where they don't over populate. Predators seem to be the political rules these days and are so admired. Guess that is why we are being eaten alive by predatory bankers.

    I too hate the shrieking screams they have, I don't think it "romantic" or some romanticized notion of rural living, being freeeeee! I feel like I am in the damned frontier having to fight off the damned wild animals to live. Crazy really, when you think of what our forefathers had to do to establish this country. I will not even think about having fowl or sheep here for that reason, I am not raising animals to feed to the wild ones.

    As a matter of fact, Google the folk singer, young woman who was killed by what was proven to be coyotes when she was out for a hike in a forest in Canada. This is not a joke.
    "I have brought on the hatred of Wall Street and I relish it".
    Franklin Delano Roosevelt



  8. #48
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    Jan. 1, 2008
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    We have quite a few around. The horses could care less. The coyotes seem to be terrified of my pot-bellied pig, who screams bloody murder when he sees one on the edge of the field. The coyotes are also scared to death of my Corgis who go after them hell-bent when they approach the property line. Come to think of it, all the coyotes seem to fear anything that makes a racket.

    I now have house cats (formerly barn cats) and bring the chickens and miniature goats in at night. I think that's tempting fate.



  9. #49
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    Feb. 23, 2007
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    Interesting all the "curious coyote" posts. They sure as hell are not "curious" here. They are opportunistic hunters that are not often seen unless they've moved into a neighborhood to predate on everyone's small pets. They do take calves, goats and sheep here in the SE which is why so many ranchers keep donkeys, LGD's or llamas or a combination of all three around. While I realize it's the exception to the rule, two killed a hiker in the NE a couple of years ago; and one tried to drag a toddler off in CA and here in GA both within the last couple of years as well, so I will not dismiss them as non-threatening.

    I had eerie experience with a pack of them here one evening the fall of 2008. I had a recalcitrant mini mare who was just the devil to catch. I had finally gotten my hands on her one evening and put her into my round pen which is back behind the barn at the edge of the trees and our property line which borders 800 acres of wooded water authority land. The pony continued not to want to caught, even in the round pen and the light was going and the barn lights do not reach the round pen. This was in early fall and I kid you not, the coyotes that had been giving us such a problem came up to fence line there at the round pen and started raising hell at me and that pony, yipping and barking to the point that my husband heard the racket all the way up at the house, came out and cleared them out with a rifle. It was a hair raising experience and they were not intimidated by my yelling at them one bit. DNR or the county one, went onto the water authority property shortly after that and burned out a big den and we haven't had that level of a concentration of them since and we now have the four LGD's which are very effective. No, not a threat to horses necessarily, but given our experience with them, I take them seriously. That was beyond weird being the focus of that yipping, yodel, sing-song thing they do when they pack up.

    Edited to ad this link which references those attacks I mentioned above: http://www.varmintal.com/attac.htm
    Last edited by FatCatFarm; Feb. 14, 2012 at 09:30 AM.
    Let us ride together; blowing mane and hair; careless of the weather; miles ahead of care...Fat Cat Farm Sport Horses



  10. #50
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    Calamber--really? Attack owls? Perhaps, just perhaps the owl was nesting and simply protecting her chicks? I hate the "oh, my god! the wildlife is WILD!" posts. Yeah, coyotes (and I get her word game, but as a teacher it pisses me off when incorrect spelling is perpetuated) are predators. I was simply stating that in MOST situations, coyotes are predators of SMALL animals. Of course they'll take your cats and small dogs--they are small animals and thus prey. Humans are prey too, hard as it is to hear that. Freak death by predator vs. human always riles up folks. Fine. But it does not good to make people fearful when they don't need to be.
    Proud member of the "Don't rush to kill wildlife" clique!



  11. #51
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    Sep. 8, 2011
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    Quote Originally Posted by Calvincrowe View Post
    Headless bunnies are almost always victims of a cat (domestic). A coyote, if it killed a bunny, would eat the whole thing, crunchy bones and all.
    Or possibly foxes. We had a vastly pregnant older broodmare in a stall one time. Barn help went to clean the stall and found something raw and bloody inside that looked like an enormous blood clot. He freaked, thinking the mare was starting to abort and called my husband who is not only a skilled horseperson but also a skilled outdoors person. HE didn't know what the indeterminate, liverish piece of flesh was either but called the vet to check on the mare. Vet came and couldn't identify the body part either but reassured him (and by then, me, since he had called me at the office) that is was NOT from the mare. Later that afternoon we discovered the rest of the bunny body, safely stashed in our shavings bin, and figured that the other part had probably ridden in with a load of shavings. Never did find a head but at dusk the thrifty red housewife who had probably placed it there was spotted digging around looking for her dinner. We laughed about it afterwards. At least until the vet bill arrived. I hate coyotes and they get no free pass on my farm, but I love my resident foxes, they are usually inoffensive and know their boundaries.



  12. #52
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    May. 19, 2011
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    Quote Originally Posted by KSAQHA View Post
    Last summer I took my Yorkie out after dark. Saw a coyote at the fenceline close to the house. The Yorkie saw it too and started running after it, barking. The coyote trotted off about 20 ft, then stopped and turned to watch the dog...as if sizing up the tiny 'threat' or, perhaps, wondering how it had the nerve. I made a mad dash to grab the silly pooch and the coyote finally took off.
    more then likely the coyote was trying to lure your pup out away from you and the yard..the pack sends a "Scout" out to lure dogs out..where the pack is waiting to ambush them. Its happened afew times to people in my area..I watched a coyote try to pull this trick on Kate one early morning while out feeding..I have instilled a foolproof recall into all my dogs because of this.



  13. #53
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    Quote Originally Posted by Calvincrowe View Post
    Calamber--really? Attack owls? Perhaps, just perhaps the owl was nesting and simply protecting her chicks? I hate the "oh, my god! the wildlife is WILD!" posts. Yeah, coyotes (and I get her word game, but as a teacher it pisses me off when incorrect spelling is perpetuated) are predators. I was simply stating that in MOST situations, coyotes are predators of SMALL animals. Of course they'll take your cats and small dogs--they are small animals and thus prey. Humans are prey too, hard as it is to hear that. Freak death by predator vs. human always riles up folks. Fine. But it does not good to make people fearful when they don't need to be.
    Ive lost small kittens to owls...or so I believe..I think the bigger kitties Ive lost were taken by coyotes. We have afew barn owls in our area..I enjoy seeing them. One made a habit of sitting on my guardlight pole at dusk EVERY night and simply watching.

    I did see a neat sight..watching them combine the wheat one year..alittle ways back was a younger coyote, catching the mice and rats who were scurrying away.



  14. #54
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    Apr. 2, 2009
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    Quote Originally Posted by Calvincrowe View Post
    Calamber--really? Attack owls? Perhaps, just perhaps the owl was nesting and simply protecting her chicks? I hate the "oh, my god! the wildlife is WILD!" posts. Yeah, coyotes (and I get her word game, but as a teacher it pisses me off when incorrect spelling is perpetuated) are predators. I was simply stating that in MOST situations, coyotes are predators of SMALL animals. Of course they'll take your cats and small dogs--they are small animals and thus prey. Humans are prey too, hard as it is to hear that. Freak death by predator vs. human always riles up folks. Fine. But it does not good to make people fearful when they don't need to be.
    Thank you.



  15. #55
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    Quote Originally Posted by Calamber View Post
    This is not true, they will kill deer, have neighbors who heard/saw the pack pulling them down. Most definitely they will kill calves if they can, and sheep, as they killed six large ewes on Bainbridge on a farm that I lived on, the couple had the carcasses checked out, and there are no roaming dogs there period. They will even change their hunting patterns, as they never used to hunt in packs, or not usually, and in some areas they do. They will hunt and kill what they can get when they get populous, thus hungry enough. They kill cats and dogs here all of the time. I lived on Bainbridge (Brain Dead) and now on the Olympic Peninsula. Big problem here. In the area where I live now they are somewhat less of a problem because more people own big dogs and they do free roam, plus these folks shoot.

    The poster who wrote ki-oat-ees was playing a word game. I don't think the person is illiterate or unable to spell. I don't see coyotes as harmless little predators, no more than the damned overpopulation of eagles who also take dogs and cats and every other thing they can on Brain Dead Island, because they are too numerous. Same goes for the owls, who some fruit loop Greenies have been feeding there, one juvenile swooped my 16 lb Jack Russell on a walk there and actually FOLLOWED US on the walk and tried several times. Another adult nesting Great Horned or some larger owl attacked a horseback rider, flying into her face and attacking her head. They have no fear because they are not hunted or kept at a level where they don't over populate. Predators seem to be the political rules these days and are so admired. Guess that is why we are being eaten alive by predatory bankers.

    I too hate the shrieking screams they have, I don't think it "romantic" or some romanticized notion of rural living, being freeeeee! I feel like I am in the damned frontier having to fight off the damned wild animals to live. Crazy really, when you think of what our forefathers had to do to establish this country. I will not even think about having fowl or sheep here for that reason, I am not raising animals to feed to the wild ones.

    As a matter of fact, Google the folk singer, young woman who was killed by what was proven to be coyotes when she was out for a hike in a forest in Canada. This is not a joke.
    Eagles were killing lambs over on a plantation where my father often hunted in SC decades ago. An eagle killed a cat (verified with witnesses) in a subdivision 3 miles from my house and right past the barn where I boarded in 2002-2004. (So I took my horses' barn cat, who'd been dumped at the barn as a kitten, and brought him home to be a house cat.)

    When we move to areas with wild life, or when wild life comes to our populated areas (as with the coyotes and eagles here in SE GA), we have to make decisions as to what to do with the wildlife. All my cats are indoor cats so that is not a problem. All my dogs are big and are in the house with a 6 ft high fenced yard. If anything bothers my horses who are now boarded inland, I'm willing to use one of my many guns to protect my horses.

    It's unfortunate that when wildlife and domestic animals meet up, sometimes one of those groups has to die. But as long as I have domesticated animals, I am going to protect them. Even if it means killing a predator. Hawks and owls will take out cats and small dogs. I don't blame people for protecting their outside domesticated animals.

    Now for those yankees who have retired to Skidaway Island and want to kill off all the wildlife because the animals eat their plants, go home!



  16. #56
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    Quote Originally Posted by spinandslide View Post
    ...I have instilled a foolproof recall into all my dogs because of this.
    Unfortunately, IME, there is no such thing for Yorkies.

    I'm always hearing about packs of coyotes, luring dogs into an ambush. Not saying it can't/doesn't happen...but, in all the years I've been observing coyote behavior on our place and around the neighborhood, I've never seen a 'pack'.
    Usually, it's just one; at most, a breeding pair...especially this time of year. I'm aware immature offspring will hang out with the family unit...for awhile. I did witness two coyotes chasing another, so hellbent on the chase, they ran right past me...literally within 15'. My big dog took off after them and they scattered.

    Maybe, the packing-up thing is regional? Just haven't see it around here.
    Is it me or do 99.9% of cowboys just look better with their hats on?
    <><



  17. #57
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    Quote Originally Posted by KSAQHA View Post
    Unfortunately, IME, there is no such thing for Yorkies.

    I'm always hearing about packs of coyotes, luring dogs into an ambush. Not saying it can't/doesn't happen...but, in all the years I've been observing coyote behavior on our place and around the neighborhood, I've never seen a 'pack'.
    Usually, it's just one; at most, a breeding pair...especially this time of year. I'm aware immature offspring will hang out with the family unit...for awhile. I did witness two coyotes chasing another, so hellbent on the chase, they ran right past me...literally within 15'. My big dog took off after them and they scattered.

    Maybe, the packing-up thing is regional? Just haven't see it around here.
    Thats the point though..you don't see the pack..they are off in the darkness...pretty smart tactic for dumb animals.

    We had a young coyote hanging around my place afew years ago..and I know he wasnt a scout..he looked like he'd been cast out of his pack..he was always by himself..



  18. #58
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    I moved to a place with coyote's, bears, wolves and even a cougar sighting this fall. So far my two wimpy show horses have remained unmolested by the local wildlife...

    We did have one coyote episode (no small dogs or horses were harmed)
    And a deer episode (only a fence was harmed)...



  19. #59
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    I would worry only if you had mares foaling, were raising sheep, goats or chickens. You could fence with some type of woven wire and put electric at the top and bottom if you are really concerned. Our neighbors would routinely lose a few newborn calves to coyotes each year ( i suspect the calves were not healthy and normal), but we never had a problem with our animals.



  20. #60
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    Quote Originally Posted by Calvincrowe View Post
    Calamber--really? Attack owls? Perhaps, just perhaps the owl was nesting and simply protecting her chicks? I hate the "oh, my god! the wildlife is WILD!" posts. Yeah, coyotes (and I get her word game, but as a teacher it pisses me off when incorrect spelling is perpetuated) are predators. I was simply stating that in MOST situations, coyotes are predators of SMALL animals. Of course they'll take your cats and small dogs--they are small animals and thus prey. Humans are prey too, hard as it is to hear that. Freak death by predator vs. human always riles up folks. Fine. But it does not good to make people fearful when they don't need to be.
    Yes, the loonies on Brain Dead feed the owls and do not think about the consequences. I grew up riding horses in areas where owls were and never, ever, did I hear about owls attacking people! But, in those days people also used guns to thin out the population of predator animals for obvious reasons. I just don't like to hear the Disneyesque romanticizing about predator animals. I would hazard a guess that if someone in your family were killed or threatened by a predator you might develop a slightly healthier attitude but maybe you would just say, "oh geez, we are in their territory". Greenie Fruitloops. Ask any of the honest wildlife managers in the areas where coyotes roam how many sheep, goats, lambs and calves, that are lost. If they get numerous enough and hungry enough, they will lunch on bigger meat packages and change their habits. That is how they have survived as predator animals do.
    "I have brought on the hatred of Wall Street and I relish it".
    Franklin Delano Roosevelt



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