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  1. #1
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    Oct. 11, 2007
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    Andover, MA
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    Default Curious: is Training Level test 1 a "dud"?

    I've been perusing show results in my area, and am noticing that very few people ride T1, as opposed to T2 and T3. Something about the canter work is difficult (you pick up the canter on a circle, canter halfway up the long side, do a half-circle and come down the opposite long side.)

    My mare was still on her journey to soundness when I practiced T1 last year, and the canter parts just. did. not. work. So we went on to T2, which is similar to the old T2 but has a stretchy trot circle added. I rode T2 at a fall schooling show and it went fine, with no major bobbles and a 69.something score. For 2012, I won't bother with T1 at all; we'll do T2 and T3, and **if** things are going well at the end of the season, might try First-1.

    I really thought the problem was in me and my horse, not the T1 test itself. Now I am not so sure...

    If there are only 3 tests at a level, and one turns out to be a dud, it seems worse than where there were 4 tests at a level... because we have to live with a dud test that almost no one does for years, and there are only 2 other tests to choose from.
    You have to have experiences to gain experience.

    Proudly owned by 1998 Morgan mare Mythic Feronia; G-dspeed Trump & Minnie; welcome 2014 Morgan filly MtnTop FlyWithMeJosephine



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar. 4, 2010
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    Default

    I think it has more to do with the new Intro C test. Doesn't seem to me that there is a whole lot of difference between them. So, if I had a horse that did well at Intro C, I'd skip T1 and go on to T2 and T3. And, if your schooling shows are like ours, skipping T1 means you show later and you don't have to get up at the crack of dawn!



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul. 1, 2009
    Location
    Northern Virginia
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    Default

    I'm definitely not a fan of the T1 test. I hate that most of it happens down at A.

    Most people here tend to do T2 and T3. Personally, I think T2 is a favorite because its pretty much the same as the old T2 with the addition of the stretch trot circle. T3 is required to qualify for our local championship shows and year-end awards.



  4. #4
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by oldernewbie View Post
    I think it has more to do with the new Intro C test. Doesn't seem to me that there is a whole lot of difference between them. So, if I had a horse that did well at Intro C, I'd skip T1 and go on to T2 and T3. And, if your schooling shows are like ours, skipping T1 means you show later and you don't have to get up at the crack of dawn!
    I don't really agree... There is a LOT more canter in T1, while Intro C (which I've also shown) has less than one circle in each direction. In T1 you start the canter in the second half of a 20 meter circle, go down the long side to either B or E, and then make a half circle from B to E or E to B, only coming out of canter when you're back on the straight.

    This is more specific to my particular horse (who used to be a canter all day sort until her injuries), but the switches from curve to straight to curve to straight caused problems.

    BUT OTOH... I am seeing 2 to 3 times as many people entered in T2 as T1 at most shows.
    You have to have experiences to gain experience.

    Proudly owned by 1998 Morgan mare Mythic Feronia; G-dspeed Trump & Minnie; welcome 2014 Morgan filly MtnTop FlyWithMeJosephine



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul. 29, 2005
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    Out in The Country
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    Default

    Intro C just judges and tests the transition into and out of the canter not the canter itself. T1 actually tests the canter and the geometry of the canter. There is a lot more canter and you canter 2 half circles. BUT I think the FEEL is similar between C and T1 (and to some, awkward) because you enter the canter on a circle started in the trot. I think that feels weird to people.

    That is my guess.

    Frankly, in my area, training level riders that just pick 2 tests tend to skirt T3 which when I ride Training level, that is my favorite test. I love the loops - I love the canter trot transition at X.

    I was looking through the intro tests and intro C really is a step towards training. T3 is a step towards first. I like this.



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb. 7, 2007
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    Default

    Not having many people in the class could also have to do with point chasing. T1 usually doesn't count for year ends, while T2 and T3 help to qualify for things like GMO Championships.



  7. #7
    Join Date
    May. 16, 2011
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    107

    Default

    I liked T1 but I never bothered with Intro. For me, I did T1 and T3 last year. If I started with intro, I may have went straight to T2. Perhaps that's the reason most skip it.



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep. 16, 2010
    Location
    Michigan
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    676

    Default

    Last year I rode T1, T2, and T3 at my GMO's schooling shows.

    I would have skipped T1 altogether, but I rode it because in T2 and T3, canter is a coefficient of 2. Last summer my horse was still having balance issues at the canter, so we were able to get higher scores by riding T1. The canter departs in T1 also have more leeway than T2 and T3 -- "Developing x lead canter 2nd half of circle" is more forgiving than "between A and K".

    So it does have a purpose. I didn't think I would like it at first but the more I rode it throughout the season, the more i was able to appreciate why it was written the way it is.



  9. #9
    Join Date
    May. 26, 2006
    Location
    North Carolina
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    Default

    Having a youngster that did Intro A-C, T1, and T2 last year, I found T1 to be very pleasant, and did not like IntroC at all. But our issue was the canter transition, not the canter itself, so the extra time that you get in T1 for the transition to the canter was very nice.



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Feb. 11, 2002
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    Default

    I am doing T-1 and T-2 at a schooling show on the 18th. I guess ignorance is bliss, because I picked them thinking they would be the easiest of the tests. I assumed they are progressively harder going from 1 to 3. I've practiced T-1 in a very small arena, and didn't find it difficult at all. In fact, with my horse being green and unbalanced at the canter, it's easier for me to pick up the canter in a circle, using the bend to encourage him coming from behind into the transition. I'm nervous about doing it in a large arena at the show, I'm afraid he's going to feel the "freedom" and canter like a maniac--LOL!



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Feb. 2, 2008
    Location
    new england
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    108

    Default

    good timing for this question for me! I have been bringing along a Fjord mare (11, started under saddle at 7)... she has spent three yrs as a therapy horse doing mostly walk and trot work with the occasional canter w/ an instructor.
    Balance in canter pretty non-existent initially - although she would try hard. I rode the Intro C and T1 for an on farm schooling show after working with her for 4 months. I knew T1 would be a challenge! Intro C fine, T1 - the picking up canter in the 2nd 1/2 of circle is fine, but, ack - the canter down the long side then 1/2 circle was a struggle.

    I then started practicing T2 which was easier for her. We have since Nov taken a break from schooling tests totally, done some pole work and a little jumping. Last night, I had the ring to myself and thought "let's run through T1" and see if her strength and balance have improved enough to make it easier.

    answer - YES! was very pleasant to ride! and now that I can tell how it *should* feel, I give her even more cred for trying for me last fall.

    I still am not sure whether we'll try T2 or T1 though at our initial foray later this spring.... a few months yet to decide!



  12. #12
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    Jul. 29, 2005
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    Out in The Country
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    EMBRACE THE CHALLENGES! =)

    Someone said somewhere - I read this - that T1 was designed to have most movements at A on purpose. That makes the rider and horse supposedly more relaxed to be away from the judge.

    I like that each test has its own unique challenges. I do think that the starting of the canter in the middle of the circle is a challenge for a green rider. But you are on a bend on a circle so technically, it should be easier if you really think about your geometry. You just dont have a corner to help you out. But I think that in some ways, this makes the new T1 more true to the level than the old T1.

    For the half circle, straight on rail and then half circle, if you keep a little more bend than normal down the rail and really sit up, it rides well.

    GOOD thing - when a test has challenges - as you master those challenges, you will out perform your competitors. To me, the better I ride each test, the better I see our training is going. So I actually have been real positive about the new tests.

    T1 in the past felt like a warmup not a test.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  13. #13
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    Feb. 11, 2002
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    Quote Originally Posted by LaraNSpeedy View Post
    Someone said somewhere - I read this - that T1 was designed to have most movements at A on purpose. That makes the rider and horse supposedly more relaxed to be away from the judge.
    Yeah, I was just thinking how advantageous this is going to be for US! My horse didn't want to go NEAR the judge's box at the last show we went to--LOL!



  14. #14
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    Oct. 6, 2002
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    Philadelphia PA
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by xQHDQ View Post
    Not having many people in the class could also have to do with point chasing. T1 usually doesn't count for year ends, while T2 and T3 help to qualify for things like GMO Championships.
    That's what's happening at the shows I attend. Intro C and T1 are grouped as a "division" for year-end awards. T2 and T3 are a different division. Hardly anyone is really at "intro" level so everyone seems to just start off in T2/T3.
    ~Veronica
    "The Son Dee Times" "Sustained" "Somerset" "Franklin Square"
    http://photobucket.com/albums/y192/vxf111/



  15. #15
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    Jul. 1, 2009
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    Northern Virginia
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by WBLover View Post
    Yeah, I was just thinking how advantageous this is going to be for US! My horse didn't want to go NEAR the judge's box at the last show we went to--LOL!
    ... and my horse wants to LEAVE at A which is why I hate T-1. LOL!



  16. #16
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    Jul. 1, 2009
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    Northern Virginia
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by vxf111 View Post
    That's what's happening at the shows I attend. Intro C and T1 are grouped as a "division" for year-end awards. T2 and T3 are a different division. Hardly anyone is really at "intro" level so everyone seems to just start off in T2/T3.
    Interesting. Our local chapter still breaks out the divisions for Intro. and Training Level.

    For Intro. Level, Test C is not required for year-end awards - only Tests A and B. As a result, many people don't seem to bother with Intro. C.

    For Training Level, you can do T-1, T-2 or T-3. T-3 is the only required test for year-end awards. So, folks tend to do a combination of tests - although T-1 still isn't very popular.



  17. #17
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    Feb. 11, 2002
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    In our GMO, Intro is Intro and Training is Training for the divisions, doesn't matter which tests of the levels you use for your averages either.



  18. #18
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    Oct. 11, 2007
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    Andover, MA
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    Our GMO groups things the same way.

    At the second show we did last fall, I did Intro C and T2. Wanted to try the canter in a "brief" version because cantering was still an issue for the mare. She did fine, so we went on to T2, where she also did fine.

    And yes, having a lot of work at A, away from the judge's box, gives an opening -- literally -- for those horses who might try to sneak out of the ring! Mine isn't one of them, but still. OTOH, sneaking out of the ring would be less alarming than a big spook at or near C...
    You have to have experiences to gain experience.

    Proudly owned by 1998 Morgan mare Mythic Feronia; G-dspeed Trump & Minnie; welcome 2014 Morgan filly MtnTop FlyWithMeJosephine



  19. #19
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    Oct. 6, 2002
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    Philadelphia PA
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    There may be some pony club influence too, although IIRC it's T1 and T3 they do.
    ~Veronica
    "The Son Dee Times" "Sustained" "Somerset" "Franklin Square"
    http://photobucket.com/albums/y192/vxf111/



  20. #20
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    Feb. 11, 2002
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    OK, so I'm entered in a schooling show on Saturday and we just got our ride times, if you thought T1 was a "dud" test that nobody wants to ride:

    20 entries for T1
    19 entries for T2
    12 entries for T3

    So, I guess it's gaining popularity--LOL! I'm in T1 and T2--wish me luck!

    This show is going from 7:30am to 11:00PM!!! WOW!! It's going to be a LONG day for the poor judge. I can't believe how big it is for being in the dead of winter.



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