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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb. 5, 2012
    Location
    North Carolina
    Posts
    53

    Default Run In Shed Plans

    Hello all. DH and I purchased our first farm and moved the horses home a couple weeks ago. The farm is 9ac and basically a clean slate so we are taking our time with laying out fence lines, building sheds, etc. Luckily the weather has been very mild temp-wise but we have had a ton of rain. Horses have been comfy in their TO sheets/blankets but its time to build a run in shed. I have scoured the internet looking for plans for a simple shed to accommodate the three of them. I'd love to find some plans (preferably free ones) that I can use to show the county permit office. Can you guys point me in the direction of some online plans?



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov. 6, 2002
    Location
    Henrico, NC 36 30'50.49" N 77 50'17.47" W
    Posts
    5,930

    Default

    Check to see if you even need a permit. "Individual Agricultural Use" bypasses most such things in N.C. If it's a commercial enterprise, it's a different story.

    Minumum 8' high on the low end, and lumber comes in multiples of 2 feet. If you aren't going to build it yourself, any carpenter can build a run-in shed.



  3. #3

    Default Run In Shed Plans

    A run in shed is a great way to let your horses let themselves out of the elements. I have designed a simple to build Run In shed plans at http://www.icreatables.com/sheds/shed-plans-run-in.html There are two common sizes that are small enough to be moved between pastures. I hope this helps!



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec. 13, 1999
    Location
    Greensboro, NC
    Posts
    36,313

    Default

    If you're going to build a wooden one, yes, any good carpenter can get the job done. It may be cheaper to find someone who does this sort of freelance work in his spare time - after work, weekends - but that doesn't mean the quality will stink Just get references, as usual. It's just a simple 3-sided structure, with support poles placed at all corners (obviously) and then as appropriate along the longer back side. If you make it deeper than 12', you may well need support in the middle of the sides as well.

    Tom gave the numbers - no less than 8' at the back, and you want at least 10' in front, even 12, depending on what you like. Horses tend to get into more scuffles at the front, so you don't want them hitting their heads.

    The next issue is how wide and deep to make it. That depends on the number of horses who would potentially use it at the same time, and how well they get along. 12x24 is really not that large, even if it seems huge in a stall situation, and while it would likely work for 2 horses who get along very well, it's not a guarantee.

    Since you're in NC, you may not need to make fully enclosed on 3 sides, since our issue tends to be heat more than cold.
    ______________________________
    The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances. - ET



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep. 26, 2011
    Location
    WNC
    Posts
    903

    Default

    This may not fit your situation but it's worked well for us on 2 farms so I thought I'd share it. We've always had a run-in shed as our only horse facility - no enclosed barn - for 2-3 horses, always in warm states.
    We've built our (permanent/not portable) run-in 20' deepx12' per horse across; you could get away with just 12' deep but we like the extra cover. When we've infrequently had to keep a horse stalled up for injury rehab, we use corral panels attached to run-in corner walls and it works fine and keeps good ventilation.
    The best thing we've done is build a small enclosed tack/feed room to one end of the run-in, as deep as the barn (i.e., 20') but only 6' across. We use about 1/2 for feed, with an old non-working chest freezer (ours is about 5' across) storing grains/supplements/meds. We also have room for 2-3 bales of hay at a time in (rest stored under cover elsewhere). Then we have 4 saddle bars that hook to the wall (simply made out of 2x4) and lots of hooks for bridles, halters, etc. With only a 6' width, you can buy closet rods from Lowes to put up for blanket/pad rods above the saddles.
    We didn't have electricity run to the shed right away so when we built it we bought 2 sidelight windows from salvage store and installed them horizontally above the TR door and in the end wall up by roof so they're not reachable by horses but let in natural light.
    We built the run-in by the main entry gate to the pasture (on the fence line) so the TR door can be NOT in the pasture with the horses. In any case use an all-metal/no window door that opens OUT for security - no horses breaking in.
    Have the 6' tack/feed room extension doesn't add much to the run-in cost because you're sharing a wall and probably only need one extra roof truss. And if it's your only horse facility for awhile, it's a lot nicer to have your tack right near your horses rather than taking up room in the garage. Good luck!
    It's just grass and water till it hits the ground.



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb. 9, 2006
    Posts
    1,783

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by GotMyPony View Post
    This may not fit your situation but it's worked well for us on 2 farms so I thought I'd share it. We've always had a run-in shed as our only horse facility - no enclosed barn - for 2-3 horses, always in warm states.
    We've built our (permanent/not portable) run-in 20' deepx12' per horse across; you could get away with just 12' deep but we like the extra cover. When we've infrequently had to keep a horse stalled up for injury rehab, we use corral panels attached to run-in corner walls and it works fine and keeps good ventilation.
    The best thing we've done is build a small enclosed tack/feed room to one end of the run-in, as deep as the barn (i.e., 20') but only 6' across. We use about 1/2 for feed, with an old non-working chest freezer (ours is about 5' across) storing grains/supplements/meds. We also have room for 2-3 bales of hay at a time in (rest stored under cover elsewhere). Then we have 4 saddle bars that hook to the wall (simply made out of 2x4) and lots of hooks for bridles, halters, etc. With only a 6' width, you can buy closet rods from Lowes to put up for blanket/pad rods above the saddles.
    We didn't have electricity run to the shed right away so when we built it we bought 2 sidelight windows from salvage store and installed them horizontally above the TR door and in the end wall up by roof so they're not reachable by horses but let in natural light.
    We built the run-in by the main entry gate to the pasture (on the fence line) so the TR door can be NOT in the pasture with the horses. In any case use an all-metal/no window door that opens OUT for security - no horses breaking in.
    Have the 6' tack/feed room extension doesn't add much to the run-in cost because you're sharing a wall and probably only need one extra roof truss. And if it's your only horse facility for awhile, it's a lot nicer to have your tack right near your horses rather than taking up room in the garage. Good luck!
    That sounds like a really workable set-up; any chance of some photos, GotMyPony?



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan. 9, 2009
    Location
    a little north of Columbus GA
    Posts
    1,911

    Default

    Another option (especially if you're not sure where fences, etc., are going yet) is a portable metal framed run in: http://www.klenepipe.com/store.asp?pid=17995

    You can (carefully, with a big enough tractor,) drag it to a new location if you need to.

    I'm very happy with mine, especially the saltbox roof overhang that provides extra shade and keeps the rain out. They have stall fronts if you want to turn it into a little shedrow barn, or you can just attach corral panels across the front if you need to use it as a temporary stall.

    And since it's portable, there's a good chance you wouldn't need a building permit. (Here you don't need one for agricultural buildings until you get to 1500 square feet.)
    --
    Wendy
    ... and Patrick



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov. 23, 2009
    Location
    Lyman, ME
    Posts
    404

    Default

    Hillview Mini barns here in Maine has a great selection to look at for ideas. If you are thinking of having someone build one for you, there are their prices listed as well for a rough guideline. A good carpenter should be able to come real close to these simple designs.
    More to the point is the many pictures and designs that will help you in the process of narrowing down what you want to build. They feature four feet of oak lined interior walls for protection from kicking animals.
    I do not know if they provide/ sell plans for their barns.
    I like the concept of at least a 12 foot wide/deep barn so that you will have at least 2 more feet of run in protection if you create 10 foot deep stalls later.

    http://www.hillviewminibarns.com/horse-barn-run-in.php
    Last edited by Rabtfarm; Feb. 6, 2012 at 07:29 PM. Reason: add



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb. 5, 2012
    Location
    North Carolina
    Posts
    53

    Default Thank you!

    Thanks for all of your great suggestions. We have been looking at the various photos and gleaning ideas from all sorts of places. My father-in-law is an excellent builder, just not familiar with horse structures, so the more info I can provide him the better. It looks like we are definitely on the right track now. If the weather stays nice we will be building this coming weekend.

    I'm sure we will have plenty of other questions as we continue planning and building our little dream farm.



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Dec. 13, 1999
    Location
    Greensboro, NC
    Posts
    36,313

    Default

    A few things to think about:

    - keep them from knocking their heads while playing/fighting at the entrance, hence the 10' minimum height there, absolutely no less than 8' in back.
    - if you choose to use aluminum or something like that for the exterior, you MUST line the inside to 4' with wood, thick plywood works well and is relatively cheap.
    - think about rain runoff at the back of the structure - even 12x24 accumulates a lot of water
    - horses congregate at entrances, so either put this on a hill that does not hold water (though it's still going to get churned up), or build a swale around it so water doesn't run into it
    - use something for footing right outside so you don't end up with a mud pit
    - which direction you face the opening will largely depend on the primary use. If you face it due South, you make the most of Winter sun and if the other 3 sides are fully enclosed, all but eliminate cold Winter wind. If you face it SE or even further East, you'll get a bit more relief from Summer sun, though at that point you want slats in the sides for ventilation
    ______________________________
    The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances. - ET



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jan. 4, 2007
    Location
    TX
    Posts
    44,451

    Default

    Try not to make them too deep.
    If you want to move them, make them a bit smaller than the gates.
    Most sheds are 12' and if you want some overhang, that adds a bit more.

    If you make the sheds very deep, the back part may have a problem with dank, moist, moldy spots, where little air and no sun ever get to.
    Sun is good to disinfect ground.

    We make our own in the shop and drag them to the pastures.
    Most we have made were for cattle, so not lined.
    For horses, you need to line them at least 4' up, 3/4" exterior plywood works well for that.
    Easy measurements to be portable are 12' by 27' to 30', the sheet metal here comes in dimensions that fit those lengths well.
    If you make portable sheds, dig a hole, drop a big chain and weld/bolt it to the frame, add 3 sacks of concrete mix, on each end and that has kept ours in place in 100 m/h winds.



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Aug. 6, 2004
    Posts
    104

    Default

    Depending on your fencing, layout, intended use, etc. have you thought about being able to change their access side? In other words, close off the windy side and allow entrance from the other? Big gates or doors on both sides, so you can allow access to and from different fields, etc.? Just thought I'd throw that out there since you are starting with a clean slate. I try to do my fencing and shelter such that it is very versatile and accessible from several directions. For pasture rotation, weather conditions, etc. It's great that you get to start from scratch and set things up the way YOU want them! Good luck and have fun!

    Also, good point about anchoring them down! We recently saw some run-ins blown apart, picked up and dropped, or set back down in someone else's fields during big storms!



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Apr. 23, 2006
    Location
    Missouri
    Posts
    94

    Default

    There was a very good how-to article in "Stable Management" magazine a couple years ago about building a run-in shed.

    http://stablemanagement.com/articles/Run-in-shelter

    In the magazine there were photos and a detailed materials list. If you msg me, I can copy and email to you.



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Oct. 8, 2012
    Posts
    1

    Default

    We have built multiple sheds on our farm and our favorite source for shed plans that has over 12, 000 plans to chose from is: http://howtobuildashedi.org/



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Oct. 28, 2012
    Posts
    1

    Default

    Here is a good source for you to check out.

    http://www.shedplans4u.com/



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Nov. 15, 2006
    Location
    Lexington, Kentucky
    Posts
    3,309

    Default

    Does anyone have any portable run in shed plans? Bluey, what do you do?
    We're spending our money on horses and bourbon. The rest we're just wasting.
    www.dleestudio.com



  17. #17
    Join Date
    Jan. 4, 2007
    Location
    TX
    Posts
    44,451

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by DLee View Post
    Does anyone have any portable run in shed plans? Bluey, what do you do?
    We don't need plans for sheds, just build them, like these two we were putting together in our hay barn one year, for our roping steers pens.
    The red pipe is a brace, that we cut off after getting the sheds moved into place:

    http://i13.photobucket.com/albums/a2...2-20-07481.jpg

    We made those 27' x 12', height I think 8' behind to 9' in front, drug them into place together and each one serves one pen:

    http://i13.photobucket.com/albums/a2...o/Puppy012.jpg



  18. #18
    Join Date
    Jun. 30, 2006
    Location
    Middle Tennessee
    Posts
    5,383

    Default

    My DH is in the process of building a modified, 12x24 version of this:

    http://www.lsuagcenter.com//NR/rdonl...ableStable.pdf

    We're putting a half wall to divide the two stalls since plan on using it as a run-in shed down the road after we build our "real" barn.
    Don't fall for a girl who fell for a horse just to be number two in her world... ~EFO



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