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  1. #21
    Join Date
    Oct. 11, 2007
    Location
    Andover, MA
    Posts
    7,778

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    I'm having a bit of a dilemma related to this issue. I am firmly in the "boots protect but don't support" camp, and my horse has worked bare-legged for most of her life because she's a surefooted beastie who does not interfere. She did wear boots when she was jumping, and I would sometimes put boots on her for trail riding in rocky terrain.

    Until now. This winter, for the first time, she has winter shoes with studs all around, and having seen the damage a stud can do to a leg, I decided to use boots (your basic inexpensive Woof boots) "just in case." And now that she's working in boots, she's hitting herself behind, especially during lateral work... something she NEVER did before she was wearing boots consistently.

    In a few weeks her winter shoes come off and she goes back to regular shoes. Said horse also has had a suspensory injury/surgery, so I really, really want her out of boots when the weather warms up, but worry that she's become less careful with her legs because now "it doesn't hurt" if she hits herself.

    So... argh.
    You have to have experiences to gain experience.

    1998 Morgan mare Mythic Feronia "More Valley Girl Than Girl Scout!"
    2014 Morgan filly MtnTop FlyWithMeJosephine "What do I do with you, Baby J?"



  2. #22
    Join Date
    Sep. 26, 2010
    Posts
    7,048

    Default

    I can't use polo wraps. At my level I'd look like a poser. lol.
    (j/k)

    In all seriousness though I might start using polos soon. Although my horse is generally pretty careful, I think the polos would be useful so I have some protection against light dings just in case.



  3. #23
    Join Date
    Aug. 15, 2010
    Posts
    2,791

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    I use them for protection - when doing lateral work with the youngsters, sometimes they do clip themselves as they sort out new movements, and with the more advanced horses - if they need to be corrected, they can get a little scrambly. Also when training with a ground person (for more collected work), I just want to know, if the horse steps sideways quickly, there is something protecting his legs.

    I love the DSB2s, and the Pro-Choice Protective Boots (they are basically a DSB type boot). The fluff lining helps keep things cooler then neoprene which does make the horse's leg hot. I use the double lock Woof boots on my bigger boned horses because they make an XW version - wish the DSBs would come out with something for the bigger boned, short cannoned horses!

    While it is true, most of the time we don't need the protection - it is that rare occassion when we DO need it, I want it there. And when hacking on the trail, I ALWAYS have boots (use the Woofs for trail rides since the fleece in the DSBs attracts stickers) - we do ocassionally slip slide on rocks, or hit a slick spot going downhill, and I appreciate the extra protection - just in case...



  4. #24
    Join Date
    Feb. 8, 2008
    Location
    Delaware Valley
    Posts
    2,287

    Default

    I've been using Polos for ages but just ordered the Ecogolds. I've heard good things about them.



  5. #25
    Join Date
    Jun. 12, 2007
    Location
    CT
    Posts
    7,194

    Default

    Boots/Wraps do diddly squat in terms of support. Not physically possible.

    However, I do use boots or wraps for protection.

    I use the Dressage Sport Boot 2s for light work and hacks. They are thick enough to actually give some impact protection, easy to put on, and more breathable than neoprene.

    I use Eskadron Climatex Liners with Saratoga Wraps for hard work. They are thick enough for impact protection without being too bulky, and conform well to the leg for comfort. The liners keep the leg much cooler than the other things I've tried. Additionally, I can get just the right amount of coverage since its a wrap.



  6. #26
    Join Date
    Oct. 4, 2010
    Location
    Middle America
    Posts
    725

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by wildlifer View Post
    This has been shown time and time again to be false. In fact, as you work, polos stretch and get looser. Look up the loading forces on a horse's leg. No piece of neoprene, fleece, velcro or whatever can provide meaningful support. Can we please stop spreading this myth?
    THANK YOU!

    It doesn't even make LOGICAL sense that a strip of fluffy fleece would support a 1300-pound animal's tendons and ligaments.



  7. #27
    Join Date
    Jul. 19, 2003
    Location
    Round Hill, VA
    Posts
    14,564

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by quietann View Post
    I'm having a bit of a dilemma related to this issue. I am firmly in the "boots protect but don't support" camp, and my horse has worked bare-legged for most of her life because she's a surefooted beastie who does not interfere. She did wear boots when she was jumping, and I would sometimes put boots on her for trail riding in rocky terrain.

    Until now. This winter, for the first time, she has winter shoes with studs all around, and having seen the damage a stud can do to a leg, I decided to use boots (your basic inexpensive Woof boots) "just in case." And now that she's working in boots, she's hitting herself behind, especially during lateral work... something she NEVER did before she was wearing boots consistently.

    In a few weeks her winter shoes come off and she goes back to regular shoes. Said horse also has had a suspensory injury/surgery, so I really, really want her out of boots when the weather warms up, but worry that she's become less careful with her legs because now "it doesn't hurt" if she hits herself.

    So... argh.
    FWIW, sometimes boots, especially of the Woof variety, make it sound like they are bashing the crap out of themselves, when they really aren't. You may just be hearing the added material brushing against the other added material, where she wouldn't if she was bare legged. My old horse sounded like he beat himself up badly in his boots, but at shows, he never left the ring with a mark, even with studs on. And he could be quite fractious and naughty. So, I wouldn't worry too much. She's probably not more careless...you can just hear her now!

    All that being said, I boot or wrap my personal horse, all the way around. That's because he has PROVEN that he can and will hurt himself (mild tendon injury) while being an idiot. Even though he is well behaved when working, he can be quite the rodeo when less engaged. And while I have gone back to turning him out naked, the days he's fractious on the way out, my heart is in my throat (I think he learned where his feet are, though, from his recent injury!). I also feel that as he is learning new things, building strength, and learning how to use his limbs and body, it is only fair to give him a little protection.

    I do use polos some, but less so because I just get lazy about rolling them. My horse has a neoprene allergy, so I typically use things similar to the DSBs....fleece lined all the way!



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