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  1. #1
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    Oct. 6, 2008
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    Default Long lining?

    Hi all,
    So I had a question about long lining horses. Right now in school I am taking a fun class called horse training where I get to train a baby for a semester. My baby is a coming 3 year old quarter pony and so far, really good and level headed. Today in class we long lined him, which is something I had never done before. It went pretty well--he was really good, but I was slightly uncoordinated because I'd never long lined before and it sure is a lot of things at once. I know my instructor talked about how long lining is good because it helps the horse get a feel for how the bit and rein pressure will work undersaddle and you can do a bit more than just regular lunging.
    My question is is this a way a lot of people typically start their baby? And is long lining bigger in some disciples than others? I've always ridden hunter/jumper and it seems like you don't see a lot of that there.



  2. #2
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    Default

    long lining is huge in driving or double lunging.

    I have always started all my horses/ponies lone lining, but my background is driving so I will always start this way.

    1) lunging
    2) long lining
    3) double lunging
    backing.....etc.



  3. #3
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    Dec. 21, 2005
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    Default

    What's the difference between long lining and double lunging? I always thought someone meant long lining when they said double lunging.

    And saitou were you also holding a lunge whip with two long lines or did they just start you off with only the lines? And were the lines wrapped up like lunge lines in your hands or were they dragging like driving style? I've had a limited introduction to long lining and I'm just curious how others are being taught.



  4. #4
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    Dec. 12, 2010
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    Default

    I long line my Saddlebreds quite often. I think it is more common in some disciplines than others.

    You will feel pretty uncoordinated to start out with, but it will get better the more you do it. Good luck!
    http://www.youtube.com/user/NBChoice http://nbchoice.blogspot.com/
    The New Banner's Choice- 1994 ASB Mare
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    Dreamacres Sublime- 2008 ASB Gelding



  5. #5
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    Mar. 6, 2006
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    Default

    I have long lined both of the youngsters I've started, it's an amazing tool (I'm an eventer - but I was taught how to break babies by someone who has a background in Western/Morgans?driving though she's a DQ now).

    for my current guy, it was the ONLY way to go, we needed a safe way to get the mad out before anyone got on his back.



  6. #6
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    Oct. 6, 2008
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Marengo View Post
    What's the difference between long lining and double lunging? I always thought someone meant long lining when they said double lunging.

    And saitou were you also holding a lunge whip with two long lines or did they just start you off with only the lines? And were the lines wrapped up like lunge lines in your hands or were they dragging like driving style? I've had a limited introduction to long lining and I'm just curious how others are being taught.
    She had me with one long line in each hand, folded up like you would a lunge line, although she said I could let them drag if I wanted to, but I was afraid that would result in me tripping...
    And then I had the lunge whip in my following/outside hand. We just walk/trotted because we are both learning.

    I am also curious about what double lunging is.



  7. #7
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    Jun. 21, 2004
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    Default

    Is double lunging just lunging with both lines instead of one?


    I have done that. You long line straight... then, circle. Next, straight... Trot straight. Then, trot in circle...

    Love starting my youngsters like this. I think it really helps them understand you when you are on them. Voice commands help also
    *^*^*^
    Himmlische Traumpferde
    "Wenn Du denkst es geht nicht mehr, kommt von irgendwo ein kleines Licht daher"



  8. #8
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    Jan. 19, 2012
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    Default

    I long lined my PSL mare when starting her, to get her used to the bit, the rein aids, the turning aids, the go-and-whoa aids, and the idea of someone other than her directing where she went, before she was backed.

    Long lining is done with two lines and the handler "ground driving" the horse from behind it. Double-longeing is done with two longe lines, one coming to the center of the circle like regular longeing, and the other coming from the outside of the cavesson and around the hindquarters, then into the circle. The handler stands at the center of the circle and holds both lines.



  9. #9
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    Oct. 14, 2010
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    Default

    Long lining is quite common for starting horses. And for bringing them back from injury (you get a workout if you are trotting though!). And some people like to use it instead of lunging.

    Yes, there is a lot going on to keep track of (and not to get tangled!). And you can really get a workout, depending on what you are doing.

    Good luck with your training!



  10. #10
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by threemagicalmares View Post
    I long lined my PSL mare when starting her, to get her used to the bit, the rein aids, the turning aids, the go-and-whoa aids, and the idea of someone other than her directing where she went, before she was backed.

    Long lining is done with two lines and the handler "ground driving" the horse from behind it. Double-longeing is done with two longe lines, one coming to the center of the circle like regular longeing, and the other coming from the outside of the cavesson and around the hindquarters, then into the circle. The handler stands at the center of the circle and holds both lines.
    That is what I ment. It didn't occur to me to explain it. LOL well said..
    *^*^*^
    Himmlische Traumpferde
    "Wenn Du denkst es geht nicht mehr, kommt von irgendwo ein kleines Licht daher"



  11. #11
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    Oct. 6, 2008
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by threemagicalmares View Post
    I long lined my PSL mare when starting her, to get her used to the bit, the rein aids, the turning aids, the go-and-whoa aids, and the idea of someone other than her directing where she went, before she was backed.

    Long lining is done with two lines and the handler "ground driving" the horse from behind it. Double-longeing is done with two longe lines, one coming to the center of the circle like regular longeing, and the other coming from the outside of the cavesson and around the hindquarters, then into the circle. The handler stands at the center of the circle and holds both lines.
    So then technically today I guess I long lined and double-lunging him. Thanks for the info!



  12. #12
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    Default

    You can long line in a circle as well as a straight line. "Double lungeing" is one of the silliest terms I have ever heard. Western people tend to call long lining ground driving.

    Saddleseat people long line a lot, all horses, even well trained mature horses, tend to get long lined once or twice a week.

    Western people tend to only long line as a step in starting a colt.

    I've seen dressage people who long line a lot and know what they are doing, and dressage people who don't know how to long line.

    I'm a saddleseat trainer. I long line with a snaffle bridle and a surcigle with a crupper. When traveling in a circle my outside rein usually comes over the horse's back. I find when you leave the outside rein around the horse's haunches you can not establish proper contact with the outside of the mouth as that rein is always being moved by the horse's hind leg, and much of the time people who long line with the outside of the rein around the haunches have a horse circling with his head and shoulders counterbent to the circle. When circling in lines just as under saddle proper contact with the outside rein is as important in maintaining proper bend on a circle as your inside rein is.


    It's a great tool. When you can long line well you can get a horse to do anything in lines that you can get it to do under saddle. Some times it is easier to teach a horse some things in lines. You can give a horse a very thorough workout without having the bear a rider's weight, and you have the vantage point of the ground to watch for straightness and that the horse is really working from back to front.
    Last edited by Renae; Feb. 1, 2012 at 07:56 AM.



  13. #13
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    Default

    Oh and in my book it is a rule of long lining to always carry a whip. Your whip is your legs. Your horse should not be afraid of it but should respond to a snap of the whip to go forward and a touch of the whip on his side or haunches to move away.



  14. #14
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Renae View Post
    Saddleseat people long line a lot, all horses, even well trained mature horses, tend to get long lined once or twice a week.
    ^^This^^

    It's one of the first things a colt learns and the first thing you do with a new horse when it comes into the barn.

    It is a great way for a trainer to get to know a horse and be able to observe it's movement, fitness level and reactions.

    Most Saddlebred colts (exceptions always exist) will learn to long line, then be hooked before they are backed. It lets them strengthen up and installs the important buttons like go, whoa and turn before they are ridden.
    Marriage: an on going experiment to prove there are at least two ways to do everything.



  15. #15
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    Default

    Another bonus of long lining, and I do a lot in the spring after the winter lay off, is it gets the handler fit as well as benefiting the horse.
    I'm not sure if I grew out of stupid or ran out of brave.

    Practicing Member of the Not too Klassy for Boxed Wine Clique



  16. #16
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    Default

    What Renae and Smart Alex said.

    What you are calling "double lunging" I call long-lining. Like Renae, I almost always have that outside line over the horses back, always use a crupper, and always carry a whip.

    Another thing that long lining can do is build a horse's confidence- very important for a horse whose first show is likely to be a county fair complete with truck pulls and carnival rides. I start mine in lines before I send then to the trainer. When I'm pretty sure they won't get tangled in the lines, every once in a while I'll line them around the farm-through the scary hay barn, around the pond and hay field, through puddles, etc. They learn to go forward without a human at their head leading the way.



  17. #17
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    Default

    I came back this morning and other posters explained what double lunging is.


    When I think of lone lining, I think of young horses, learning their surroundings, walking closely behind them ( not too close of course) and learning how to steer.

    When I think double lunging, I think of an older horse who knows how to steer but is now learning how to work from behind. I have never heard the western world use the term double lunge because I am not in it. I have heard every single European driver use the term. Also when I double lunge an older horse I run the lines through the turrets on the saddle, through the ring on the big and down in between the front legs. You need nice loonnnggg lines for this.
    I would never do this with a green to drive/ground work or young horse.



  18. #18
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    Munchingonhay, in English that would be long lining in draw reins. Saddleseat people will long line in draw reins or straight reins depending on the situation. I suspect the term "double lungeing" comes from a literal translation of whatever the technique is called in German. It has been called long lining or long reining in English for a very long time, whether you are working on a straight line or in a circle.



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