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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr. 30, 2014
    Posts
    2

    Default Which Discipline Best With Pelvic Prolapse?

    Hi everyone, I have a problem that could potentially effect any woman at any age but is more common with older women and I happen to be one. I'm 61. I had surgery a year ago to remove my ovaries and recently have been diagnosed with a rectocele that I think is related to the surgery but not the entire reason for my problem. It's easiest to just say my pelvic organs are falling a bit and my pelvic structure is not as strong as it use to be. I've been taking dressage lessons recently but I've considered changing to Western. Now that I've found out about the pelvic prolapse, I'm afraid Western would be too bouncy and I'd do better to keep posting the trot as I do now. Some say you never post riding Western because it's just not considered good form. Others say they post riding Western all the time. Anyway, given my situation, I'm wondering what would be healthiest discipline for me. I never dreamed I would ever have this problem. Hope someone out there can relate or has some experience with this. I've only been riding for several years or I might know exactly what would work best. Thank you.



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan. 4, 2007
    Location
    TX
    Posts
    42,374

    Default

    I had surgery for total pelvic floor reconstruction for a similar condition.

    Did your doctor tell you you should be careful about any other than lifting and straining?
    That is my only restriction, no more hefting hay bales around.
    I drag them with a hay hook and use a dolly to move them here and there.

    My dr said that riding was fine.
    Sure you post in a western saddle, just in some show classes you may not.
    A soft trotting horse would be better than a rough moving one, if you have some such restriction.
    Many western horses are smooth trotters.



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr. 30, 2014
    Posts
    2

    Default

    Bluey,

    I never said thank you for replying. I do appreciate it. I've just had a lot on my mind lately and forgot to respond. Do you mind my asking what specialist did your reconstruction and how they did it? I'm in the stage of talking to doctors and making decisions. Thank you.



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan. 4, 2007
    Location
    TX
    Posts
    42,374

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by zialove View Post
    Bluey,

    I never said thank you for replying. I do appreciate it. I've just had a lot on my mind lately and forgot to respond. Do you mind my asking what specialist did your reconstruction and how they did it? I'm in the stage of talking to doctors and making decisions. Thank you.
    You are welcome.

    My regular doctor sent me to an obstetrician, that just got back from Houston practicing with the robot, but didn't think that was appropriate for my operation.

    Tests show a mass high up and that was pushing the organs out of place, prolapsing them.
    In case that was a cancerous mass, maybe ovarian or colon cancer, he wanted the option to open wide and proceed that way.
    He warned he may have to take part of the intestines, etc. and I may end up with a bag and if it was cancerous, he may already give first treatments right away.

    He said if all went well and didn't need to open up, maybe he could get it all done in 45 minutes.
    He started vaginally with an endoscope, the mass was some herniated intestines in the wrong place and no cancer.
    He did a partial hysterectomy while he was in there and took 2:15 hours to sew it all back up where it needs to be.
    Was supposed to stay in the hospital five days, but they let me go home after 3, I was doing so well.
    Have not had any problems whatsoever from that operation.

    He did tell me he would not operate if I didn't promise to never, ever, lift more than 10-20 lbs.
    After the operation, he said in a pinch I could lift a bit more, like with a heavier saddle, but never more than 50 lbs and that rarely and with care.
    He said if I didn't watch not lifting, pushing or pulling heavy weights, or just straining in any way, his repair may not hold, so to avoid that or I would be needing surgery again.
    You bet I watch not to overdo it.
    Makes exercising harder and I have to watch working around the barn and with horses to go extremely light in any I do.
    I asked about riding, he said go ahead, that was fine.

    You really need to talk this over with your primary physician and, depending on what is going on, he may guide you to the right specialist for your situation.



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct. 21, 2008
    Location
    Little Rock and Boxley, Arkansas
    Posts
    338

    Default

    Have you considered driving? Most fun you can have and, as a sport, your aging is pretty much irrelevant.



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep. 12, 2013
    Location
    Wisconsin
    Posts
    749

    Default

    Maybe a nice smooth gaited horse. Walkers are great for show and trails.



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr. 28, 2013
    Location
    Vancouver Island
    Posts
    934

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Zwarte View Post
    Have you considered driving? Most fun you can have and, as a sport, your aging is pretty much irrelevant.
    A well-sprung carriage (or cart) and a nice squishy seat and it's not much different than driving a car! Driving is a ton of fun, you can do it regardless of age and physical ability - if you can get in the vehicle you can drive the horse

    I LOVE the newfound connection I have with my pony since training to drive. He's that much more aware of me and responsive to my aids, and having to trust that I'm still with him even when he can't see or feel me has been a huge help with his confidence. I absolutely love it and can't wait to see where we go as we progress!
    Curious about Trans* issues? Feel free to ask!
    Saving Pennies To Get My Own Canoe


    2 members found this post helpful.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb. 23, 2005
    Location
    Spotsylvania, VA
    Posts
    13,573

    Default

    My mother had a similar issue which her gyn fixed with a very low tech/old fashioned pessary.
    I wasn't always a Smurf
    Penmerryl's Sophie RIDSH
    "I ain't as good as I once was but I'm as good once as I ever was"
    The ignore list is my friend. It takes 2 to argue.



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Sep. 3, 2003
    Location
    somewhere north of nowhere
    Posts
    190

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by carolprudm View Post
    My mother had a similar issue which her gyn fixed with a very low tech/old fashioned pessary.
    Not sure if this is applicable... but when I was first pregnant (with my first child rather), my OB shared some of his experience with riders. HIS opinion was that childbearing has gotten harder over the years for women who ride due to 1 thing that was not only common, but almost invariable 100 years ago. Women rode side saddle. Which, according to his premise, developed "the correct" musculature for childbearing and birth. After having the last of my pregnancies, I asked him if I'd be better or worse off learning to ride aside? He did mention that now that my "duties" were over, it wasn't so much a factor, but if I wanted to avoid ever having to have a "bladder lift" (?), then definitely try to spend some time going aside (which led to me later wanting to soooo badly!!)
    Yes, there ARE different muscles used. My fear - so please check with a doctor who'd know (sports therapist? equestrian ob/gyn?) about whether it would be WORSE for you. I can't imagine how YOU'D feel, but *I'd* feel awful for having mentioned it and caused a worse issue!
    If A equals success, then the formula is: A = X + Y + Z, X is work. Y is play. Z is keep your mouth shut. - Albert Einstein



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jan. 4, 2007
    Location
    TX
    Posts
    42,374

    Default

    My problem was directly the result of trying to lose weigh.
    I had a heart attack due to a heart defect I was born with.
    The medication to help with the heart arrhythmia the heart attack caused made me gain 35 lbs in 5 1/2 monts.
    I tried to lose that weight, but could not, so decided to work out at the gym.
    I was there 6 days a week working 1 1/2 hour each.
    The trainer was surprised that at 4'11" I was lifting most weights that big men could not.
    We were working at that limit, because less was not going to increase my metabolism enough and it took that resistance to get the exercise I needed, along with all the other cardio work.

    After six months, the pelvic floor collapse started, so I quit the gym and a year later had to have surgery to repair that.

    Lesson learned, carrying extra weight is not that bad, not as much as too much exercise trying to lose that weigh.

    Another cause of that was that, several years after menopause, all those tissues were getting weaker and more lax naturally, contributing to those kinds of problems.

    According to the gynecologist, riding is not the cause and not contraindicated.



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