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  1. #1

    Default riding after a knee replacement

    Had a knee replacement 3 years ago and don't think I'll ever feel the same in the saddle......



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar. 6, 2009
    Posts
    8,871

    Default JINGLES & AO ~ Hoping YOU find your 'ride' again ```


    Jingles that you find your 'ride' again ``` AO

    please keep trying ``` well worth the work ```
    Zu Zu Bailey " IT"S A WONDERFUL LIFE !"



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb. 21, 2007
    Location
    MA
    Posts
    106

    Default

    I'm really interested in what feels different? My left knee was replaced six years ago (I am 75) and I truthfully felt no different riding. Dismounting is another story! I am still fearful of reinjuring the new knee.
    Before the TKR I could barely walk, but still skied. People stared at me as I hobbled to the lodge but I had no problem skiing before and returned to cross-country skiing the end of the second month and got in a few days of downhill a few weeks later. Still ski.
    Just wondering if your riding in general problem has the same mental basis as my dismounting?



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep. 6, 2007
    Location
    Loudoun County, VA
    Posts
    46

    Default

    Friday will be the four month marker for my knee replacement and this weekend was the first time I could really trot. I have yet to try to carter, but I almosted tried to jump a little cross rail this weekend. One issue for me has been the weather so the times I have been able to ride have been very limited.

    It still does feel a little funny, but if I have my heel down and under me it feels fine. I just need to build my muscle tone back up. I am very sore today.



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul. 29, 2007
    Posts
    57

    Default

    I am in the same boat as I have nerve damage and my leg feels like its asleep all the time, its pins and needles. My knee surgery was 4 years ago and last year I finally really got to ride and start training again.



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb. 21, 2008
    Location
    Near Lexington, KY
    Posts
    9

    Default

    Hi:

    I had a new knee installed in October 2010, was riding 4 weeks later, jumping 2 week after my first ride. At 4 months I was cleared to resume life and come back in a year for a recheck. I did & was subsequently cleared for 5 years when they will check the wear on the pads.

    Speaking as an exercise physiologist, I can assure you the key to future success in the saddle is to strengthen both legs to the point where your knees especially your new knee are supported by well conditioned, strong muscle, tendons and ligaments. This means for many doing daily exercises like leg lifts, walking 2 to 3 miles a day, riding a bicycle, etc.

    Good luck one and all, Jon
    Jon
    Hundridge Farm in the Kentucky Bluegrass



  7. #7

    Default Knee replacement

    Very interested in hearing more from you about riding after knee replacement surgery. I started riding two years ago at age 53. I had had gastric bypass surgery and lost 160 lbs. I have become fairly fit thru riding 4 times a week. Zumba 3-4 times a week and circuit training 2 times a week. My knees can not be saved and my right kneecap just falls out of place now. I need bilateral knee replacement and have scheduled it. I have a lot of fear about not being able to resume my current level of activity ASAP. I've scheduled surgery again but would like to hear about your preparation for surgery and rehab. Thanks



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb. 21, 2008
    Location
    Near Lexington, KY
    Posts
    9

    Default

    Hi:

    First off let me start by congratulating you on losing a lot of weight and then taking the necessary steps to keep yourself fit. The key to maintaining leg strength while riding post surgery is keeping your leg muscles, tendons and ligaments (which hold your new knees in place) strong and healthy so that they not only keep your knees strong but help them continue to do their job for years to come.

    The stronger you are going into surgery the better your recovery will be. In my case, I’ve always been in pretty good shape as I was a career Marine for 25 years and during that time ran over 40 marathons. My left knee was damaged in a college lacrosse game and some 40 years later it just wore out and needed to be replaced. I went into surgery strong and healthy with the post-op goal to be riding in 4 weeks and jumping in 6. There were a few bumps in the road, but I met my goals.

    I had some very specific requirements of my new knee, so I interviewed 4 orthopedic surgeons before choosing the one I thought was best suited for my lifestyle. Primarily, I wanted a knee that would have no restrictions on use post surgery. I have the Biomet Vanguard knee which was designed for an active lifestyle. I recommend you discuss your post surgery requirements/expectations with your surgeon to be sure the technique he plans to use and the artificial knees are going to meet your expectations.

    Post surgery, you should go (or have them come to you) to a Physical Therapist who knows post surgery rehabilitation techniques and exercise routines for a bilateral knee replacement and if you are lucky enough to find one, a physical therapist who is also a rider. Mine was and she tailored my routine towards having me riding at 4 weeks post surgery. After 6 weeks, she turned me loose.

    After surgery I had more trouble with my back and hips being misaligned than I did my new knee. They tried to adjust to my posture (I was an inch taller & stood straight) which proved to be annoying and sometimes quite painful. I got no relief from either the physical therapist or a chiropractor, so on the advice of a friend, I went to a massage therapist. She had all the answers! Within 3 weeks, my spine and hips were coming back into alignment and within 2 months, I was walking, running and riding straight once again! Both my jumpers trainer and my dressage instructor noticed my posture had changed for the better. I saw the massage therapist weekly for 3 months, then monthly thereafter.

    Good luck! It’s a lot of work but well worth it! After the first week, you’ll feel so much better.
    Jon
    Hundridge Farm in the Kentucky Bluegrass



  9. #9

    Default

    Thank you so much for responding your information is appreciated. I've been on bedrest for a couple of days after a dislocated kneecap. I swam today and plan to tomorrow. Will ride on Saturday. My goal will be to get as fit as possible before surgery.

    Are there replacement knees that you researched that did not measure up to your lifestyle?



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